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Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
Atlas of the human body preview
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Atlas of the human body preview

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Download Club members can download @ http://www.christianhomeschoolhub.com/pt/Anatomy-The-Human-Body---Teaching-Resources-and-Downloads/wiki.htm

Download Club members can download @ http://www.christianhomeschoolhub.com/pt/Anatomy-The-Human-Body---Teaching-Resources-and-Downloads/wiki.htm

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  1. Atlas of the Human Body Your torso consists of two parts — the chest and the abdomen. The chest contains your heart and lungs; your abdomen contains the diges- tive and urinary systems. Your chest and abdomen are separated by a dome-shaped sheet of muscle called the diaphragm.
  2. Atlas of the Human Body Your circulatory system consists of your heart and blood vessels. To- gether, these provide a continuous flow of blood to your body, supply- ing the tissues with oxygen and nutrients. Arteries carry blood away from the heart; veins return blood to the heart.
  3. Atlas of the Human Body Your arteries carry blood away from the heart. Oxygenated blood is pumped out of the heart through the body's main artery — the aorta. Ar- teries that branch off the aorta transport blood throughout the body, sup- plying tissues with oxygen and nutrients.
  4. Atlas of the Human Body Your digestive system consists of organs that break down food into components that your body uses for energy and for building and repairing cells and tissues. Food passes down the throat, down through a muscular tube called the esophagus, and into the stomach, where food continues to be broken down. The partially di- gested food passes into a short tube called the duodenum (first part of the small intestine). The jejunum and ileum are also part of the small intestine. The liver, the gallbladder, and the pancreas produce enzymes and substances that help with digestion in the small intestine. The last section of the digestive tract is the large intestine, which includes the cecum, colon, and rectum. The appendix is a branch off the large intestine; it has no known function. Indigestible remains of food are expelled through the anus.
  5. Atlas of the Human Body The small cavity between the eardrum and inner ear conducts sound to the inner ear by three tiny bones called the malleus (the hammer), the incus (the anvil), and the stapes (the stirrup). The inner ear contains the cochlea (a coiled structure responsible for hearing), the semicircular ca- nals (concerned with balance), and the vestible. The vestibule is an oval cavity that contains the saccule and utricle, which communicate with the cochlea and semicircular canals. The vestibular nerve passes im- pulses from the inner ear to the brain and is associated with balance; the cochlear nerve - part of the vestibular nerve - is associated with hearing.
  6. Atlas of the Human Body The brain and spinal cord comprise your central nervous system. The network of nerves that connect at different levels of the spinal cord con- trol both conscious and unconscious activities. It is through the spinal cord that information flows from these nerves to the brain and back again.
  7. Atlas of the Human Body Your nervous system is composed of the central nervous system, the cranial nerves, and the peripheral nerves. The brain and spinal cord to- gether form the central nervous system. The cranial nerves connect the brain to the head. The four groups of nerves that branch from the cervi- cal, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions of the spinal cord are called the peripheral nerves.
  8. Atlas of the Human Body Your respiratory system provides the energy needed by cells of the body. Air is breathed in through the nasal cavity and/or mouth and down through the throat (the pharynx). The throat has three parts - the nasopharynx, the oropharynx, and the laryngopharynx. The air passes down the trachea (the windpipe), through the left and right bronchi, and into the lungs. Oxygen in the blood is delivered to body cells, where the oxygen and glucose in the cells undergo a series of reactions to provide energy to cells, and the waste product of this process is carried out of the lungs. The larynx is your voice box; the epiglottis, a flap of cartilage that pre- vents food from entering the trachea; and the esophagus, the tube through which food passes to the stomach.
  9. Atlas of the Human Body

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