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Internship Workshop D I S 001

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Introduction about finding an internship in Denmark. Cultural Differences, Customs, Resources and Tips

Introduction about finding an internship in Denmark. Cultural Differences, Customs, Resources and Tips

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  • In 2010, DIS exchange students accounted for the largest share of the increase of international students in Denmark. CHECK figures ANDERS
  • The Honeymoon Phase During this period the differences between the old and new culture are seen in a romantic light, wonderful and new. For example, in moving to a new country, an individual might love the new foods, the pace of the life, the people's habits, the buildings and so on. The "Everything is awful" phase After a few days, a few weeks, or a few months, minor differences between the old and new culture begin to add up to become tiresome and annoying. One may long for food the way it is prepared "back home," may find the pace of life too fast or slow, may find the people's habits annoying, etc. The "Everything is OK" phase Again, after a few days, weeks or months, one grows accustomed to the new culture's differences and develops routines. At this point, an individual no longer reacts to the new culture positively or negatively, because it no longer feels like a new culture. An individual becomes concerned with basic living again, as they were in their original culture. Reverse Culture Shock Returning to one's home culture after growing accustomed to a new one can produce the same effects as described above.
  • Four skill areas which research has shown to be critical in adapting to other cultures... Emotional resilience Coping with stress and ambiguity, rebounding from imperfections and mistakes; trying new things and experiences and interacting with people in new or similar situations. People who are emotionally resilient tend to have a positive attitude, resourcefulness and have the ability to modulate negative emotions. Flexibility/openness The extent to which a person enjoys the different ways of thinking and behaving that are usually encountered in a cross-cultural experience. The items deal with openness toward those who are different from oneself; tolerance of others and flexibility with regard to new experiences. It involves a non-judgmental approach and flexibility or role behavior. Perceptual acuity Attention to communication cues and the accurate perception of cues across cultures. It assesses behaviors as well as perceptions. It is synonymous with cultural empathy. It is the ability to distinguish the logic and coherence of other cultures and involves the ability to interpret non-verbal and social cues. Personal autonomy Deals with personal identity, confidence in one’s values and beliefs and a sense of empowerment in the context of an unfamiliar environment with different values. It measures a person’s sense of identity and adherence to a strong set of cultural values, as well as respecting the values and traditions of the other culture.
  • http://www.cultureactive.com/help/demo.html Scandinavian countries: Finland cooperation! Non-talkative, language Southern EU: Multi: talkative, emotional, impulsive Northern EU: Linear: factual, organizers, punctual Reactive: introvert, silent listeners
  • http://www.cultureactive.com/help/demo.html Scandinavian countries: Finland cooperation! Non-talkative, language Southern EU: Multi: talkative, emotional, impulsive Northern EU: Linear: factual, organizers, punctual Reactive: introvert, silent listeners
  • http://www.cultureactive.com/help/demo.html Scandinavian countries: Finland cooperation! Non-talkative, language Southern EU: Multi: talkative, emotional, impulsive Northern EU: Linear: factual, organizers, punctual Reactive: introvert, silent listeners
  • Four skill areas which research has shown to be critical in adapting to other cultures... Emotional resilience Coping with stress and ambiguity, rebounding from imperfections and mistakes; trying new things and experiences and interacting with people in new or similar situations. People who are emotionally resilient tend to have a positive attitude, resourcefulness and have the ability to modulate negative emotions. Flexibility/openness The extent to which a person enjoys the different ways of thinking and behaving that are usually encountered in a cross-cultural experience. The items deal with openness toward those who are different from oneself; tolerance of others and flexibility with regard to new experiences. It involves a non-judgmental approach and flexibility or role behavior. Perceptual acuity Attention to communication cues and the accurate perception of cues across cultures. It assesses behaviors as well as perceptions. It is synonymous with cultural empathy. It is the ability to distinguish the logic and coherence of other cultures and involves the ability to interpret non-verbal and social cues. Personal autonomy Deals with personal identity, confidence in one’s values and beliefs and a sense of empowerment in the context of an unfamiliar environment with different values. It measures a person’s sense of identity and adherence to a strong set of cultural values, as well as respecting the values and traditions of the other culture.
  • Four skill areas which research has shown to be critical in adapting to other cultures... Emotional resilience Coping with stress and ambiguity, rebounding from imperfections and mistakes; trying new things and experiences and interacting with people in new or similar situations. People who are emotionally resilient tend to have a positive attitude, resourcefulness and have the ability to modulate negative emotions. Flexibility/openness The extent to which a person enjoys the different ways of thinking and behaving that are usually encountered in a cross-cultural experience. The items deal with openness toward those who are different from oneself; tolerance of others and flexibility with regard to new experiences. It involves a non-judgmental approach and flexibility or role behavior. Perceptual acuity Attention to communication cues and the accurate perception of cues across cultures. It assesses behaviors as well as perceptions. It is synonymous with cultural empathy. It is the ability to distinguish the logic and coherence of other cultures and involves the ability to interpret non-verbal and social cues. Personal autonomy Deals with personal identity, confidence in one’s values and beliefs and a sense of empowerment in the context of an unfamiliar environment with different values. It measures a person’s sense of identity and adherence to a strong set of cultural values, as well as respecting the values and traditions of the other culture.
  • Gender roles: maternity for men, dual careers
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2.
      • Create a Pool of the Best Potential Trainees for our Business Partners
      • Support you to be ready for an International Work Experience
      • Introduction about Cultural Different Management Styles DK-US
      • Practical Information & Tips
      • Share some Existing Internship Opportunities
      Goal of this Workshop?
    • 3. Biography
      • French nationality. Studied, lived or worked in 7 countries
      • Graduated from Copenhagen Business School with
      • a MSc. in International Business Adm. & Languages
      • In France, HRM for a Danish subsidiary from the Pharmaceutical Group Novo Nordisk Engineering
      • Expatriated in Denmark since 2006
      • In my last position with Novo Nordisk Engineering, as Global Marketing Manager, worked on a daily basis with colleagues from all over the world (based in 25 different countries)
      • With DIS for a year as Project Manager
    • 4. Introduction of the Participants
      • Reasons for being here today
      • Professional Goals
      • Expectations/Needs
    • 5. Cultural Shock “ The anxiety and feelings (of surprise, disorientation, confusion, etc.) felt when people have to operate within an entirely different culture or social environment, such as a different country”
    • 6. Stages of Adjustment Source: Gregory Trivonovitch
    • 7. The Importance of Culture is Important in International Position
      • Impacts the way Strategic Moves are Presented
      • Influences Management,
      • Decision-Making and Negotiations
      • Culture makes International Business Difficult or Easy
    • 8. Different Levels of Culture
    • 9. Challenges when working abroad
      • Differing attitudes towards hierarchy and authority
      • Conflicting norms for decision making
      • Differences in what motivates people
      • Different degrees of rule obedience
      • Conflicting approaches towards time
      • Direct versus indirect communication
      • Trouble with accents and fluency
      • Different ways of organizing project work
      • Different presentational styles
    • 10. Important Important Skills for Cross-cultural Adaptability
      • Emotional resilience
        • Coping with stress and ambiguity, rebounding from imperfections and mistakes
      • Flexibility/openness
        • Enjoys different ways of thinking and behaving
      • Perceptual acuity
        • Attention to communication cues and the accurate perception of cues across cultures, including non-verbal and social cues.
      • Personal autonomy
        • Sense of identity and adherence to a strong set of cultural values, as well as respecting the values and traditions of the other culture.
        • A sense of empowerment in the context of an unfamiliar environment with different values.
    • 11. Different Cultural Types - Lewis Model
    • 12. Different Cultural Types -
    • 13. Different Cultural Types -
    • 14. Some Characteristics of Danes & Americans
      • DANES
      • Big emphasis on equality
      • Consensus decision-making  flat management style
      • Process -oriented
      • Undersell, modesty
      • Gender roles are “fluid”
    • 15. Some Characteristics of Danes & Americans
      • AMERICANS:
      • Individualism  competition
      • The Boss is the one responsible
      • Result -oriented, risk-takers
      • Like bragging
      • High masculinity level
    • 16. Characteristics of the Danish culture
      • Democratic and consensus -seeking decision-making
      • The Jantelov supporting ideologies of equality over individual freedom
      • Little emphasis on position
      • Informal way of adressing others
      • Employees modestly motivated by financial incentives, rather unambitious, more family -oriented, work shorter hours, come and leave at a set time
      • Separation of working life and social life
      • Women and men are very equal
      • A relaxed business atmosphere where emotions ar not shown
      • A low need for predictability and a high rule obedience
      • Tasks tend to prevail over relationships
    • 17. Americans and Danes compared
      • Americans
      • More emphasis on position
      • Boss makes decisions
      • Materialism, b ottom-line focus
      • Action oriented
      • Oversell, aggressive
      • Differentiation of gender roles
      • Danes
      • More emphasis on equality
      • Consensus decision-making
      • People orientation, sharing
      • Process oriented
      • Undersell, modesty
      • Gender roles are “fluid”
    • 18. Human Mental Programming - Denmark
    • 19. Human Mental Programming - USA
    • 20. Leadership styles
      • DENMARK
      USA
    • 21. National Communication Patterns - USA
    • 22. National Communication Patterns - Denmark
    • 23. Listening Habits: USA
    • 24. Listening Habits: DENMARK
    • 25. . Appointments are necessary, and plan well ahead . Confirm appointments in writing . Do not try to schedule meetings from June through mid August . You should arrive at meetings on time!The Danes are very punctual . Shake hands with everyone upon arriving and leavin (firm & rather short) . Danes move to first names very quickly . Send an agenda before a meeting and work from it without deviation . Decisions are made after consulting with everyone involved (consensus) . Presentations should be well-organized and factual. Use facts, figures and charts to back up statements and conclusions. . There will be a minimal amount of small talk. Danes prefer to get down to business quickly . Communication is rather direct Business Etiquette and Protocol in Denmark
    • 26. Do ´s & Don´ts in Denmark
      • Do’s
      • Interested in profit but pretend it is secondary
      • Insist on tolerance of views and flexibility
      • Wait for decisions by consensus
      • Modesty
      • Low-key
      • Stick to facts and analyse
      • Seem reasonable
      • Be on time!
      • Humor (irony)
      • Don’ts
      • Avoid showing too much interest in materialism/bottom-line
      • Avoid interrupting people; always be consultative and understanding
      • Avoid being overly assertive or appearing overly confident
      • Avoid boasting
    • 27. A resume? No, a CV!
      • A resume is called a Curriculum Vitae, a CV
      • Name, Adress and Contact Details in....Denmark!
      • Dates must be stated in the left hand column
      • Clear separation between job titles, work places and the the job content
      • Use the first person “I was responsible” instead of just “Responsible”
      • Write an introduction paragraph/personal profile
      • Importance of personal life, leisure
      • Picture
    • 28. Tips & Resources
      • CV in data bases (job data base, embassies, linkedin...)
      • Specialised websites:
        • Graduateland
        • JobsinCopenhagen
        • Jobindex
        • CBS job bank
    • 29. Tips & Resources
      • The power of networking , here & there!
        • Alumni (home Uni, DIS...)
        • International Organizations (Rotary Club...)
        • Previous Company Experience
        • Importance of “club-belonging” in DK
        • - Social & Professional Expat Groups (Soso, Meetup, Expats in Denmark..)
    • 30.  
    • 31.  
    • 32.  
    • 33. Tips & Resources
      • Contact with Key Institutions eg. American Embassy, The American-Scandinavian Foundation, The Danish-American Business Forum, the American Chamber of Commerce...
      • Use of Social Media (expats groups, express your research, define your profile...)
      • Check http://www. nyidanmark . dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/work/trainees .htm for general information about internship process in Denmark (visa, etc.)
    • 34.  
    • 35. Use DIS network!
      • Your Teachers!
      • Guest lecturers
      • Field visits
      • Study Tours
      • Company Case Assignments
      • Business Case Competition (Danfoss)
      • International Career Night -
      • 19th of October 2011
    • 36. Examples of Companies which collaborate with DIS
    • 37. Tips & Resources
      • Learning Danish language ,
      • a crazy idea?!
    • 38. Current Offers through DIS
      • Peripatetic
      • C02 e-race project with The Danish Institute for Culture
      • Danish-American Business Forum
      • Uponor
      • Mærsk Trade Oil
    • 39.
      • Questions?
      • Your future needs?
      Conclusion
    • 40. Good luck!!!

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