Copyright and  Open Content
How much do you know?
<ul><li>If you have drawn a picture, written a song, or taken a photo, you own the copyright (even if you don’t put a © sy...
<ul><li>If you have drawn a picture, written a song, or taken a photo, you own the copyright (even if you don’t put a © sy...
<ul><li>What do you have to do legally to use a copyrighted work in something you’re going to post to the Internet? </li><...
<ul><li>What do you have to do legally to use a copyrighted work in something you’re going to post to the Internet? </li><...
<ul><li>You can use any picture on the Internet legally in something you’re going to publish. </li></ul><ul><li>True or fa...
<ul><li>You can use any picture on the Internet legally in something you’re going to publish. </li></ul><ul><li>False </li...
<ul><li>How long does copyright last? </li></ul><ul><li>a. 10 years </li></ul><ul><li>b. 50 years </li></ul><ul><li>c. the...
<ul><li>How long does copyright last? </li></ul><ul><li>d. the life of the creator + 70 years </li></ul>
<ul><li>You can’t legally use anything copyrighted without contacting the creator and getting permission. </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>You can’t legally use anything copyrighted without contacting the creator and getting permission. </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>There is a way for creators to give you permission to  share  without you having to ask. </li></ul><ul><li>Someone...
Some examples  <ul><li>The Beastie Boys, Nine Inch Nails, and others have licensed music under Creative Commons. </li></ul...
CC BY  – You can use however you want; just cite the source. CC BY SA  – You can use however you want, but you must cite t...
Other Licenses <ul><li>Public domain  – You can do whatever you want with it (mostly government stuff) </li></ul><ul><li>G...
Your Project <ul><li>Draw your own art </li></ul><ul><ul><li>or </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Look for art that is open licensed ...
<ul><li>Think about finding art that matches the theme and tone of your writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure to cite your ...
Credits <ul><li>This presentation was created by Karen Fasimpaur. It is licensed under CC-BY.  </li></ul><ul><li>Backgroun...
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Copyrightandopencontent

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  • Discussion points: Ask kids what they already know about copyright. Correct misperceptions (many will talk about plagiarism or copyright infringement) , but don’t give to much of a “lecture” pending the rest of the questions.
  • Discussion points: If I draw a sketch on a piece of paper, I own copyright, even if I don’t right “© Copyright 2008, Karen Fasimpaur.” Question to students: How many of you own copyright to something? Answer: All of you!
  • Discussion points: What can be the challenges with contacting the creator?
  • Discussion point: The key word is LEGALLY. Point out that one exception to this is fair use. If a work is not going to be published or shared and is only being used in the classroom, fair use applies, but you still need to cite the source.
  • Discussion points: Discuss how long this might be (average lifespan + 70 years). This is a very long time! (And the trend of legislation has been to make this longer.) Some people are concerned that this is too long. What are the challenges with this? Talk about things that have gone out of copyright – public domain. What are examples? (Shakespeare)
  • Discussion points: What are the exceptions to this? Kids should know by now that fair use is an exception. Ask students if they know of any other exceptions. (Some may know that sometimes a creator will give you permission to share in advance…see next slide).
  • Discussion points: Ask kids why successful musicians might make music available for free and for sale on CDs? (Answers: promotion, easy of use, etc.) Ask kids what they know about Wikipedia. What makes it different from other encyclopedias? (Answers may include: it’s free; it’s online; it has more information; anyone can edit it.) Discuss the point that anyone can edit Wikipedia. How is this good? (More information; more accurate; involves everyone) How is it bad? (Could be inaccurate information; vandalism). Go to a Wikipedia article (for example, one about your school district.) Edit it together. Encourage students to feel empowered. This is what open resources are all about.
  • Discuss different licenses. (These are included on student handout as well.)
  • These are all “student friendly” resources. (There are many others, like Flickr, but they may have content unsuitable for classrooms. These can be discussed if you like or if students bring them up.)
  • Discussion points: Do an example together. Read a portion of a poem. Have students talk about the tone of the poem. Have them describe the types of images they might look for BEFORE going to a photo web site. Ask them to describe not only the content, but the tone and other qualities of the image (dark vs. light, happy vs. sad, etc.) Then go to www.openphoto.net and search for photos. Talk about search strategies. Look at images to see which might be most appropriate. Select an image and have student identify the source (person) and license. Copy and paste the image into a Word doc and show how to write a credit line, e.g. “Credit: George Mann from www.openphoto.net.” Segue into an activity where students go to computers and start finding images for their own project. Make sure they think about photos that are appropriate to their work and that they include credits.
  • Copyrightandopencontent

    1. 1. Copyright and Open Content
    2. 2. How much do you know?
    3. 3. <ul><li>If you have drawn a picture, written a song, or taken a photo, you own the copyright (even if you don’t put a © symbol on it). </li></ul><ul><li>True or false? </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>If you have drawn a picture, written a song, or taken a photo, you own the copyright (even if you don’t put a © symbol on it). </li></ul><ul><li>True </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>What do you have to do legally to use a copyrighted work in something you’re going to post to the Internet? </li></ul><ul><li>a. Copy and paste it. </li></ul><ul><li>b. Cite the source. </li></ul><ul><li>c. Get the creator’s permission. </li></ul><ul><li>d. Nothing </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>What do you have to do legally to use a copyrighted work in something you’re going to post to the Internet? </li></ul><ul><li>c. Get the creator’s permission. </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>You can use any picture on the Internet legally in something you’re going to publish. </li></ul><ul><li>True or false? </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>You can use any picture on the Internet legally in something you’re going to publish. </li></ul><ul><li>False </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>How long does copyright last? </li></ul><ul><li>a. 10 years </li></ul><ul><li>b. 50 years </li></ul><ul><li>c. the life of the creator </li></ul><ul><li>d. the life of the creator + 70 years </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>How long does copyright last? </li></ul><ul><li>d. the life of the creator + 70 years </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>You can’t legally use anything copyrighted without contacting the creator and getting permission. </li></ul><ul><li>True or false? </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>You can’t legally use anything copyrighted without contacting the creator and getting permission. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually true, but not always… </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>There is a way for creators to give you permission to share without you having to ask. </li></ul><ul><li>Someone who owns a copyrighted work can choose to share by licensing their work under Creative Commons . </li></ul>
    14. 14. Some examples <ul><li>The Beastie Boys, Nine Inch Nails, and others have licensed music under Creative Commons. </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone who adds things to Wikipedia agrees to share it under a “some rights reserved” license. </li></ul><ul><li>Some people are writing open licensed textbooks. These could save college students thousands of dollars. </li></ul>
    15. 15. CC BY – You can use however you want; just cite the source. CC BY SA – You can use however you want, but you must cite the source AND license your work under a sharing license. CC BY ND – You can use the work but you can’t change it or put it into a bigger work; also cite the source. CC BY NC – You can use only if it is noncommercial (you can’t charge $); cite the source.
    16. 16. Other Licenses <ul><li>Public domain – You can do whatever you want with it (mostly government stuff) </li></ul><ul><li>GFDL (Wikipedia uses this) – Share alike license </li></ul>
    17. 17. Your Project <ul><li>Draw your own art </li></ul><ul><ul><li>or </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Look for art that is open licensed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.openphoto.net </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.morguefile.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.sxc.hu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.wpclipart.com </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Think about finding art that matches the theme and tone of your writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure to cite your sources! Tell where you got your art (even if it’s your own.) </li></ul><ul><li>For things that you create, think about how you want to license it (for example, CC-BY). </li></ul>
    19. 19. Credits <ul><li>This presentation was created by Karen Fasimpaur. It is licensed under CC-BY. </li></ul><ul><li>Background image courtesy of MorgueFile; photo by Carlos Paes. </li></ul>
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