Can I Use That? Creative Commons in the World of Web 2.0
Who says I can’t use that? <ul><li>“License” means to give permission to use </li></ul><ul><li>“Copyright” gives exclusive...
It was on Google <ul><li>Search engines give users access to innumerable resources </li></ul><ul><li>All of the informatio...
What are they going to do?  Throw me in Internet/Copyright Jail? <ul><li>From the US Copyright Office: “(e) Civil Remedies...
Creative Commons makes ethics easy <ul><li>Copyright infringement is best avoided by strictly adhering to professional and...
Two ways to solve the rights dilemma: <ul><li>Method 1: </li></ul><ul><li>Research the rights and/or licensing agreements ...
Two ways to solve the rights dilemma: <ul><li>Method 2: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and use information licensed under Crea...
All Rights Reserved <ul><li>The Creative Commons infrastructure is built by the authors of information </li></ul><ul><li>B...
Where can I find Creative Commons materials? <ul><li>The following are examples of entities that use Creative Commons lice...
References <ul><li>http://www.copyright.gov/title17/ , U.S. Code Title 17 and 18 </li></ul><ul><li>Creativecommons.org </l...
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Creative Commons and Copyright Presentation

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Creative Commons and Copyright Presentation

  1. 1. Can I Use That? Creative Commons in the World of Web 2.0
  2. 2. Who says I can’t use that? <ul><li>“License” means to give permission to use </li></ul><ul><li>“Copyright” gives exclusive permission to use to the creator of original work </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, copyright is a strict or narrow license </li></ul><ul><li>The use granted by copyright is specific and limited. </li></ul>
  3. 3. It was on Google <ul><li>Search engines give users access to innumerable resources </li></ul><ul><li>All of the information that appears in a “search result” was created by someone </li></ul><ul><li>At the moment of information’s creation, rights to the information were also created </li></ul><ul><li>Simply because a user has access to information, does not automatically grant that user rights to the information </li></ul>
  4. 4. What are they going to do? Throw me in Internet/Copyright Jail? <ul><li>From the US Copyright Office: “(e) Civil Remedies. (1) In general, a n y copyright owner who is injured, or is threatened with injury, by a violation of subsection (a) may bring a civil action in an appropriate United States district court.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ b) Any person who commits an offense under section 506(a)(1)(A) of title 17 (1) shall be imprisoned not more than 5 years, or fined in the amount set forth in this title, or both, if the offense consists of the reproduction or distribution, including by electronic means, during any 180-day period, of at least 10 copies or phonorecords, of 1 or more copyrighted works, which have a total retail value of more than $2,500;(2) shall be imprisoned not more than 10 years, or fined in the amount set forth in this title, or both, if the offense is a felony and is a second or subsequent offense under subsection (a); and(3) shall be imprisoned not more than 1 year, or fined in the amount set forth in this title, or both, in any other case.” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Creative Commons makes ethics easy <ul><li>Copyright infringement is best avoided by strictly adhering to professional and academic ethical standards </li></ul><ul><li>However, with the rate at which information is disseminated through the Internet, it may be difficult to discern who owns the rights to certain information </li></ul><ul><li>There are two ways to solve that dilemma </li></ul>
  6. 6. Two ways to solve the rights dilemma: <ul><li>Method 1: </li></ul><ul><li>Research the rights and/or licensing agreements </li></ul><ul><li>Reputable resources state their copyright claims in a manner easy for the user to see </li></ul><ul><li>Often, it is simply a statement of “copyright” with the author and year. </li></ul><ul><li>More complex licensing agreements may be found in “Terms of Use”, which are typically presented in the form of a link to several pages of legalese </li></ul>
  7. 7. Two ways to solve the rights dilemma: <ul><li>Method 2: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and use information licensed under Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>In summary, Creative Commons seeks to provide “universal access” of information in a “free, public, and standardized infrastructure that creates a balance between the reality of the Internet and the reality of copyright laws. </li></ul>
  8. 8. All Rights Reserved <ul><li>The Creative Commons infrastructure is built by the authors of information </li></ul><ul><li>By licensing their work under a Creative Commons license, authors maintain (reserve) some rights to their material, while allowing access on a scale as limitless and cost effective as the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Simply put, Creative Commons epitomizes the collaborative nature of the Internet by allowing users access to information without fear of copyright infringement, while simultaneously sustaining an author’s interest in their product </li></ul>
  9. 9. Where can I find Creative Commons materials? <ul><li>The following are examples of entities that use Creative Commons licenses: </li></ul><ul><li>Flickr </li></ul><ul><li>Google </li></ul><ul><li>MIT OpenCourseWare </li></ul><ul><li>Public Library of Science </li></ul><ul><li>Wikipedia </li></ul><ul><li>Whitehouse.gov </li></ul>
  10. 10. References <ul><li>http://www.copyright.gov/title17/ , U.S. Code Title 17 and 18 </li></ul><ul><li>Creativecommons.org </li></ul>

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