Follow The Money The CUSD Budget Data Sources: OMB, EdSource, EdData, Alliance for Excellent Education, CUSD
Topics to be Covered <ul><li>Why is education valuable to our community? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the federal, state, an...
The Value of Education <ul><li>“ Upon the education of this country,  </li></ul><ul><li>the fate of this country depends” ...
The Big Picture – Budgeted for Education Federal and State Education Budgets In Billions of Dollars
The Big Picture – Budgeted for Education CUSD Budget In Millions of Dollars
Sources of Funding for a  California School District
Restricted vs. Unrestricted Revenue <ul><li>Restricted (categorical) funds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can only be spent on desi...
Federal Funding Sources
Background on State School Funding <ul><li>1971 - Serrano vs. Priest </li></ul><ul><li>1978 - Proposition 13 </li></ul><ul...
State Funding Comparison <ul><li>Property taxes to Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1978 =  66% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
State Budget
The Scope of CUSD <ul><li>Cities:   7 </li></ul><ul><li>Schools:    58 </li></ul><ul><li>Students:    51,000 </li></ul><ul...
Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>Community </li></ul>1980 2009 Population 237,288 398,439 # Homes 41,103 137,189 Average Price o...
Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>Schools </li></ul>1980 2009 # of Schools 28 58 # of Students 24,153 51,512 # of Teachers 570 2,...
Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>School District </li></ul>1980 1980 CUSD Budget $42 million $360 million Programs  Buses Librar...
Revenue Sources to CUSD <ul><li>Budget: $360 Million </li></ul><ul><li>State Funds  88%   ($315.9 million)  </li></ul><ul>...
CUSD Budget – 2009/10
Education – $ Per Student  <ul><li>2006–07 Expenditures per K–12 Pupil      </li></ul><ul><li>U.S Avg.  California Rank   ...
CUSD - $ Per Student 2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  Year
Local Funding Sources <ul><li>2009:  $3,708,951 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Educational Foundations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B...
Expenses of CUSD Item % $ Teacher Salaries 51% $197,502,270 Teacher Benefits 13% $50,511,841 Classified Salaries 15% $57,1...
Unrestricted Funds for Expenses
Budget Cut History <ul><li>  Year Amount </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2006-7 $ 0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007-08  $10.5M </li>...
Causes of Budget Problems <ul><li>Reduced federal education subsidies </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced state education revenue </...
Cuts Taken - So Far <ul><li>2008-09 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cut Administrative Staff (40+ positions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Actions Being Considered <ul><li>Reduce teachers salaries by 10% </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce number of teachers </li></ul><ul...
Potential Impact of Budget Crisis <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Educational programs </li>...
Possible Solutions Federal & State Eliminate unfunded government mandated programs  State Provide equitable per student fu...
What You Can Do <ul><li>Learn about the issues </li></ul><ul><li>Get involved  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Write letters </li>...
Remember the Value of Education <ul><li>“ Next in importance to freedom and </li></ul><ul><li>justice is popular education...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lwv Presentation 03 26 10 Final

522 views
459 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
522
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • PRESENTER: PETTI We conducted this study because the League of Women Voters has always been a strong supporter of public education. In addition, many members are current or former educators. This interest and support heightens our concern about the many problems public schools are having today. Funding for education has suffered the worst in California. Here locally, the Capistrano Unified School District is faced with reduced income from the State and has been forced to make budget cuts. The purpose of this program is to show you where the school district gets its money, the restrictions on how it’s spent, and where it’s spent. We expect you’ll be surprised to find out how little flexibility the administrators have in how the money is spent. Ask audience : How many of you grew up in California? How many had children or grandchildren through CA schools? How many currently have children or grandchildren in CUSD? How many of you are educators or former educators? Pop Quiz : What percentage of of CA budget is spent on K-12 education? (Answer 31% plus an additional 10.6% on higher education) Transition: Let’s look at what we’ll cover today .
  • PRESENTER: PETTI (read points) Transition: So let’s begin with a very brief look at the value of education to our community.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI Our country and our community benefits when we have informed and responsible citizens who actively participate in society. Educated citizens become our leaders and create the innovative products and services that enable our economy to grow and prosper. Our community benefits from having skilled and knowledgeable workers to provide the necessary products and services we need to survive and thrive. O ur country also benefits when we don’t have the social and prison costs that often are the result of limited education. 75% of state prison inmates are high school dropouts; illiteracy costs $224 billion per year (more than the cost of education) But certainly individuals reap financial benefits the more education they receive. In 2007 adults with a bachelor’s degree earned 55% than those with just a high school degree more (that’s an extra $23,000) and 29% more than those with 2 years of college. But individuals also reap psychological and social benefits from the confidence, social acceptance, and better employment opportunities that education provides. Transition: So if education is so valuable, let’s see what we’re spending on it.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI Federal Government has increased its budget by 3 billion; most of it for a program called “Race to the Top” – funds which CA did not get. The State Education budget was 39.5% in 2006 ; today is is 31% - short of the 40% mandated by the Gann Initiative. Remember that illiteracy costs $224 billion per year. The PROBLEM is that despite a growing population of students, and increased costs (including healthcare) both the federal government and state government have cut back on funding for education. The reason for this we all know: The economic crisis at the federal level The budget shortfall here in California The continued limited per student funding here in CUSD And mandated programs that receive limited or no funding Transition : Let’s take at the CUSD Budget
  • Notice the decrease from the 2006/07 school year ($382.9 million) to this school year (359.9 million). I’ll talk more about this later in this presentation. Transition : Let’s take a brief look where a CA school district gets its money.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI This is NOT the breakdown for CUSD, but for school districts in general in California. Notice that state funds and property taxes make up about 83% of the revenue to a school district. These numbers are for 2007-08. In the 2008-09 school budget, the states share went down to 58.7%. State Funds come mostly from Sales tax and Income tax. Property taxes are allocated to the schools as determined by the State. The Lottery Funds are about $137 per student. Of that 86% is unrestricted, and 14% must be spent on instructional materials. TRANSITION: You need to understand that there are restrictions on the funds that a school district receives .
  • PRESENTER: PETTI Before we go into a discussion of funding, you must understand the difference between Restricted funds (sometimes called “categorical funds”) and Unrestricted funds. Restricted (or categorical) means that the money can only go to the program or specified item. All of the money from the Federal Government is restricted. About 1/3 of all K-12 funding comes from more than 85 state and federal categorical fund. The largest amount is for Special Education ($3+ billion). Federal restricted funding makes up about 10% of California’s K-12 budget – the largest for a group of programs called “ No Child Left Behind” which supports educationally disadvantaged pupils, and students who live in poverty . Unrestricted General Funds can be spent as the local school district decides. The largest chunk of this is spent on teacher’s salaries and benefits. Transition: Now Sharon Holdt will give you more details about the Federal and State sources of education funding .
  • PRESENTER: SHARON All of the Federal funds for education are restricted funds - that means they’re only for specific programs. Listed here are the 6 programs that make up 95% of the spending. $16.9 billion - Student Aid-Pell Grants (30%) $15.2 billion – Education for Disadvantaged (27%) $11.7 billion – Special Education $5.1 billion – School Improvement Programs $4.3 billion – Race to the Top program $2.9 billion – Rehabilitation Services In 2009: Restricted Funding from the Federal Government Included *Race to the Top funding: $4.35 billion - California did not qualify for the initial round of funding TRANSITION: Now let’s look at what our State has done and is doing to fund education
  • PRESENTER: SHARON To understand the problems in school funding in California, you must understand the history of some of our propositions: Serrano vs Priest -- Its purpose was to equalize the funding between schools in wealthy districts and those in poorer districts. Proposition 13 - Limited property taxes and tax increase. State had to fill in for lack of revenue, and therefore, took more control. Until 1978 it provided 2/3rds of the revenue for education.; today it’s about 23% Proposition 4 – Gann Initiative - State would reimburse school districts for the cost of implementing any new state-required program or service (There is currently over $1 billion in unpaid mandate claims). Proposition 98 - provides K-14 schools with a guaranteed funding of 40% that grows each year with the economy and the number of students Proposition 111 – Revised Prop 98 Proposition 20 – half of excess lottery money must be spent for textbooks TRANSITION: Now let’s see how these proposition affect funding for schools.
  • PRESENTER: SHARON In 1978 before Proposition 13 went into effect, property taxes supplied 66% Over 25 years later, in the 2006-07 school year, property taxes provided a little over 23% Also in 2006-07 the State provided over $67 billion dollars, which was just below the 40% guaranteed by Proposition 98 Notice that this coming school year is projected to be at only $37 billion ( 31% ) - well below the guaranteed funding percentage -even though school expenses have not gone down. The reasons for this reduction in funding are a result of the impact of the propositions and the impact of the current economic situation . Transition: Now let’s take a quick look at how the state spends it’s money .
  • PRESENTER: SHARON Notice that education gets the lion’s share of the budget: 31% for K-12 and an additional (though it is supposed to be 40%) 10.6% for higher education [total is 40.6%). The next higher category is Health and Human Services with about 25%. Despite all the media reports, prisons represent only 6% of the budget. Transition: Now Marilyn O’Brien will tell you about our local school district.
  • PRESENTER: MARILYN Founded in 1965 Largest employer in south Orange County 2nd largest school district in Orange County 9th largest school district in California – based on enrollment 195 square miles. It includes San Clemente, Dana Point, San Juan Capistrano, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, and Rancho Santa Margarita; also the communities of Las Flores, Coto de Caza, Dove Canyon, Ladera Ranch, and Wagon Wheel. Governed by a 7 member school board; 3 are up for re-election in November and 2 others are subject to a recall action. CUSD has an acting superintendent; efforts are being made to find a permanent superintendent. Transition: Let’s take a look at how our school district has changed over the years .
  • PRESENTER: MARILYN
  • PRESENTER: MARILYN
  • PRESENTER: MARILYN Transition: Now Petti will go over the budget specifics of CUSD.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI As you can see, there are 3 sources of revenue to CUSD: the state government, the federal government, and local sources (which include group and individual donations). Notice the whopping percentage that the state contributes. And remember how much less it is getting from property taxes – and must rely on income and sales taxes. Thus when the state is in trouble, our school district is in trouble. TRANSITION: The state’s contribution to CUSD is based on a per student fee. Let’s look at what it is.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI As you can see, the bulk of the budget is unrestricted funds. $283.4 million The largest portion, $248 million, is spent on teachers salaries and benefits . That leaves the district with only $35 million to spend on all the unrestricted and other expenses. *Besides the $70 million of restricted funds in the General Fund, there’s an additional $65.8 million in restricted funds that are for specific things like the insurance, construction, and food services. These funds CANNOT be used for another purpose. GAP: Notice that currently the estimated expenses exceed the budget by $25.5 million . Thus the current discussions on reducing teacher salaries. Transition: Okay, let’s look at what States give per student for education
  • PRESENTER: PETTI You can see that CUSD is getting less per student than the California state average or the national average. Washington DC spends $16, 540 (highest) and Arizona spends $5,255 (lowest) And California is ranked 49 th in the number of teachers it has per pupil. Not a pretty picture! Transition: CUSD’s rate has fluctuated the past few years.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI This is the amount per student that the State allots to CUSD per student. This year it is $4,982 per student; in 2007 it was $5,783. This is the general unrestricted annual amount that is provided for each student by the state. This amount is determined by a complicated formula that begins with the school’s attendance figures. This rate was set in the early1970s when our school district was mostly rural and much less populated Transition: What has changed over the past few years, is the reliance on local sources of income to offset what we’re not getting from the state
  • PRESENTER: PETTI CUSD gets additional income from several local sources. Most of these funds are Restricted - that is they’re for special programs like music and sports. Transition: Now that we’d looked at where the money comes from, let’s look at how it is spent .
  • PRESENTER: PETTI You can see that teacher salaries and benefits are 64% of the budget. Up to now teachers have not had any salary cuts. Classified salaries and benefits are 21%. Over 40 positions have already been eliminated in order to reduce this expenses. Books and supplies: Textbooks are only $2.2 million, equipment is $1.1 million, and materials and supplies make up a whopping $15.2 million Services &amp; Operating Expenses: $9.5 million is for operations and housekeeping; 14.1 million is for professional and consulting services Other services includes: fund transfers, debt service, and payments to County Education Office for student services Just a reminder that $385 million in expenses is $25 million more than money currently in the budget. Thus some additional cuts will need to be made. Cutting teacher’s salaries by 10% will save about $20 million - still not enough. Transition: Let’s take a closer look at how a couple of these unrestricted expenses impact the budget.
  • Here you can see that of the $283 million in unrestricted funds, $248 million (88%) is for teacher’s salaries and benefits. That leaves on $ 35 million (12%) for all other expenses that need to be covered by unrestricted funds. So you can see that CUSD has very little budget flexibility; added to this problem that mandated programs that are usually covered by restricted funds, sufficient money has not come from the Federal government or State government, so other unrestricted programs have been cut in order to fill this revenue gap in the mandated programs; for example Special Education. Transition: Let’s take a look at what budget cuts CUSD has had to make.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI Notice the gradual increase in cuts over the past 4 years - a direct reflection on our state’s poor fiscal health. It is estimated that expenses will need to be cut an additional $25.1 million - next school year. We have no idea where this will come from - though the school district is working on this now. Transition: Let’s review again, what has caused these budget cuts.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI As a review: CUSD’s budget problems are mainly the result of these 6 factors Federal funds are only for 1-2 years, so they can’t be counted on as a regular source of income; in additional California did not qualify for Race to the Top funds. State education revenue is affected by the economy and the fact that the state has to carry the lion’s share of the cost of education. The State is not even providing the mandated 40% funding to the schools. Not only Proposition 13, but the current mortgage and foreclosure crisis has impacted revenue from property taxes Unfunded mandates is a big problem. For example, Special Education is mandated by the federal government and state government, but is not adequately funded. But if CUSD does not meet special education requirements it can be fined by the state or federal government and sued by parents. Get numbers from Chris . We may spend $36 million on special education but receive only xxx from Federal and State sources Financial flexibility has been restricted by the various propositions Per student funding in CUSD is partially based on demographics in the 1970s when the area was more rural. Transition: Let’s take a look at how these budget cuts have effected CUSD.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI As you can see the cuts in the last school year were mainly taken at the district level. However for this school year, more cuts had to be taken at the school level. Programs that were reduced or eliminated include: library, GATE, music, art, summer school, athletics, counselors, textbooks, and teacher development. This is not all – just some of them. Transition: And more cuts are being proposed.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI In addition to cutting programs and services, these are other actions being considered.. The school board has approved that this month 322 teachers will receive “pink slips”. Eliminating these teachers would increase class sizes in first grade by 5 students, and 4 th through 12 th by 1 student each. In middle and high school, some courses might be eliminated or consolidated including foreign languages and electives. Transition: All these cuts are having, and will have, an impact on our school district.
  • PRESENTER: PETTI Teacher and student morale can drop which often affects their performance If less educational programs are offered that could impact college admissions Schools can get run down and classroom supplies limited –or parents may have to provide some supplies The school year can we shorter (although we have the fewest school days in the developed countries) Class sizes can increase which may have an impact on learning We risk having fewer students graduating and other students unprepared for college or today’s more knowledge-centric jobs. Transition: Let’s look at some possible solutions .
  • PRESENTER: PETTI As you can see there are actions that could be taken on several levels. But these are difficult changes , especially in today’s political climate. ( Read the possibilities on the EdSource Winter 2010 flyer) There is very little more that CUSD can do. They can borrow from an outside source, but that involves interest and state restrictions. They can ask the voters to pass a general obligation bond They can ask the voters to pass a parcel tax; it requires a 2/3 votes. They usually pass only in the wealthier school districts. But now even Los Angeles Unified is trying this. However the general belief is that the current CUSD school board would not even consider it. Another possible CUSD source would to get even stronger support from local businesses. Maybe read the suggestions from Robert Reich Transition: So what can you do?
  • PRESENTER: PETTI ( Are there graphics to make this more interesting? ) You can learn more about our state education. There are some wonderful, easy to understand resources on our state education and funding that are accessible online. A website called EdSource is terrific. You can become involved by attending meetings of the school board (2 nd Tuesday of each month, the PTA, or other education groups such as Children First You can give money to support a school program or volunteer your time at one of your local schools. And you can vote in November to support local representation of your school board. Extend yourself, learn the truth then act to tell others.  Be a leader in reform . Does anyone have other suggestions? Transition: We’re about at the end of our program
  • PRESENTER: PETTI I’d like to end our program with another reminder of value of education. I want you to know that this was a group research effort of our panel members Sharon Holdt and Marilyn O’Brien and to league members Judy Jones and Sandy McCanne) I like to thank my fellow panelist – and especially all of you for your interest in our program. We want to know if we met your expectations and how we can improve this program. So please take a couple minutes to complete the evaluation form. Before I ask our guest from the education advocacy group “Children First” to talk .... “ What questions do you have?”
  • Lwv Presentation 03 26 10 Final

    1. 1. Follow The Money The CUSD Budget Data Sources: OMB, EdSource, EdData, Alliance for Excellent Education, CUSD
    2. 2. Topics to be Covered <ul><li>Why is education valuable to our community? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the federal, state, and local sources of revenue to CUSD? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the expenses of CUSD? </li></ul><ul><li>What is being done to resolve the CUSD budget cuts? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do? </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Value of Education <ul><li>“ Upon the education of this country, </li></ul><ul><li>the fate of this country depends” </li></ul><ul><li>Education provides value to </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>our Country </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>our Community </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>each Individual </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. The Big Picture – Budgeted for Education Federal and State Education Budgets In Billions of Dollars
    5. 5. The Big Picture – Budgeted for Education CUSD Budget In Millions of Dollars
    6. 6. Sources of Funding for a California School District
    7. 7. Restricted vs. Unrestricted Revenue <ul><li>Restricted (categorical) funds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can only be spent on designated programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: special education </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Unrestricted funds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be spent on general expenses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: teacher salaries </li></ul></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Federal Funding Sources
    9. 9. Background on State School Funding <ul><li>1971 - Serrano vs. Priest </li></ul><ul><li>1978 - Proposition 13 </li></ul><ul><li>1980 - Proposition 4 </li></ul><ul><li>1988 - Proposition 98 </li></ul><ul><li>1990 - Proposition 111 </li></ul><ul><li>2000 - Proposition 20 </li></ul>
    10. 10. State Funding Comparison <ul><li>Property taxes to Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1978 = 66% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007 = 23.1% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Budgeted for Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2006-07 39.5% $67.1 billion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2010-11 31% $37 billion </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. State Budget
    12. 12. The Scope of CUSD <ul><li>Cities: 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Schools: 58 </li></ul><ul><li>Students: 51,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers: 2,454 </li></ul><ul><li>Support employees: 1,949 </li></ul><ul><li>Total Budget: $360 million </li></ul>
    13. 13. Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>Community </li></ul>1980 2009 Population 237,288 398,439 # Homes 41,103 137,189 Average Price of Homes $168,000 $500,000+ Average Household Income ??? $85,867 Diversity of students White 64.9% Hispanic 18.7% Asian 5.3% Other 11.1% White 67.4% Hispanic 18.0% Asian 5.2% Other 9.8%
    14. 14. Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>Schools </li></ul>1980 2009 # of Schools 28 58 # of Students 24,153 51,512 # of Teachers 570 2,231 Class Size ??? Kindergarten 31 First Grade 26 2nd-5 th Grade 32 Middle School 32.5 High School 34.5
    15. 15. Comparisons - CUSD <ul><li>School District </li></ul>1980 1980 CUSD Budget $42 million $360 million Programs Buses Libraries Speech Nurses Science Labs Music Special Education Computer Labs Libraries Speech Music Recess Monitors Intl Baccalaureate Special Education
    16. 16. Revenue Sources to CUSD <ul><li>Budget: $360 Million </li></ul><ul><li>State Funds 88% ($315.9 million) </li></ul><ul><li>Federal funds 8.5% ($30.6 million) </li></ul><ul><li>Local Sources 3.5% ($13.5 million) </li></ul>
    17. 17. CUSD Budget – 2009/10
    18. 18. Education – $ Per Student <ul><li>2006–07 Expenditures per K–12 Pupil </li></ul><ul><li>U.S Avg. California Rank CUSD </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>$9,565 $9,124 24 $5,531 </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher to student ratio: ranked 49 </li></ul>
    19. 19. CUSD - $ Per Student 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 Year
    20. 20. Local Funding Sources <ul><li>2009: $3,708,951 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Educational Foundations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Booster Clubs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PTA groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Donations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Donations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Other: Leases and other sources </li></ul>
    21. 21. Expenses of CUSD Item % $ Teacher Salaries 51% $197,502,270 Teacher Benefits 13% $50,511,841 Classified Salaries 15% $57,107,223 Classified Benefits 6% $22,527,136 Books & Supplies 5% $18,502,401 Services & Operating Expenses 8% $29,595,944 Capital Expenses .0002% $58,000 Other Expenses 3% $9,764,174 TOTAL 100% $385,569,089
    22. 22. Unrestricted Funds for Expenses
    23. 23. Budget Cut History <ul><li> Year Amount </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2006-7 $ 0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007-08 $10.5M </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2008-09 $20.5M </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009-10 $35.2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2010-11 $25.1 (estimated) </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Causes of Budget Problems <ul><li>Reduced federal education subsidies </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced state education revenue </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced revenue from property taxes </li></ul><ul><li>Unfunded education mandates </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of financial flexibility - restricted revenue </li></ul><ul><li>Inequitable local funding per student </li></ul>
    25. 25. Cuts Taken - So Far <ul><li>2008-09 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cut Administrative Staff (40+ positions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cut Transportation/Maintenance (84 positions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced Reserves + Shifted Spending </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2009-10 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eliminate 2nd & 3rd grade class size reduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cut 10% Administrative Salary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce or Eliminate Programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cut More Staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Obtain Categorical Funding Flexibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reorganize Savings </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Actions Being Considered <ul><li>Reduce teachers salaries by 10% </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce number of teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Increase class size </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce or eliminate more programs </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce school year </li></ul>
    27. 27. Potential Impact of Budget Crisis <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Educational programs </li></ul><ul><li>School maintenance and supplies </li></ul><ul><li>School year </li></ul><ul><li>Class Size </li></ul><ul><li>High school graduates </li></ul><ul><li>College admissions </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled employees for businesses </li></ul>
    28. 28. Possible Solutions Federal & State Eliminate unfunded government mandated programs State Provide equitable per student funding County Increase sales tax CUSD Identify other income sources for education Voters Modify current propositions; add new ones Approve bond or parcel tax
    29. 29. What You Can Do <ul><li>Learn about the issues </li></ul><ul><li>Get involved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Write letters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Sign Petitions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Join advocacy groups/PTA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Explore or support other local education solutions/changes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contribute time and/or money to a local school </li></ul><ul><li>Vote on the school board issue in November </li></ul>
    30. 30. Remember the Value of Education <ul><li>“ Next in importance to freedom and </li></ul><ul><li>justice is popular education, </li></ul><ul><li>without which neither freedom nor </li></ul><ul><li>justice can be maintained ” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>James A. Garfield (20th president of U.S.) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>

    ×