LWu ConceptualDesignFogg
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • First of all, I saw your posting about sunscreen a few days back, thanks to Google Alerts. Good for you! I was bragging about you to some industry people this week, saying how some Stanford students really dive into projects and do things that aren't required.

    Now, on to the design . . . The idea came across fairly well except for the part about sunscreen bombing. I didn't understand that.

    You can test this idea fairly well. The key factors, as you point out, is if the RAs will cooperate. If you can figure out how to do this, you've really got something powerful to leverage. Keep going. Try it . . . we'll see.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
584
On Slideshare
584
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
1
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Weather or Not A conceptual design by [Leslie Wu] Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge to encourage moderate sunscreen & Vitamin D usage
  • 2. Weather or Not
    • Persuasive Purpose
      • To encourage a moderate increase sunscreen usage on especially sunny days and Vitamin D tablets on particularly rainy/gloomy days
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Industrial Design
    cc-by  http://www.flickr.com/photos/93033713@N00/2845037002/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/fdecomite/320686077/ text msg
  • 3. User Description
      • Stanford dorm RAs and PHEs (peer health educators) are motivated to help encourage health habits in their communities
      • They are likely a few years older than their student peers, 
      • Use cell phone text messaging but not necessarily Twitter,
      • Concerned about health but very busy with other concerns
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 4. Weather or Not Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu The text message will tell her about the weather in local terms (it's super sunny on Wilbur field!) and have a bit.ly link to let her e-mail her residents On an especially dreary/rainy day, the system may (or may not) remind her to provide Vitamin D to her residents, and to make things really random... Grace wants to be a helpful RA and PHE but she's inside studying all the time Fortunately, she has signed up for the "Weather or Not" service on her cell phone, that works a little like a slot machine When it is an especially sunny day, the system will text message Grace in the afternoon at some unpredictable time reminding her to suggest sunscreen to her "kids" At most once a quarter, the system will pick one RA, and have the other RAs "bomb" them with excessive sunscreen after fountain hopping
  • 5. Prototype of "Weather or Not" Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu it's really sunny out there, 74 and bright on Wilbur! Put on sun- screen? bit.ly/sx
  • 6. Features/Functionality
      • The system keeps track of weather over the weeks, and detects positive (especially sunny) and negative (especially rainy / cold) anomalies in the nearby weather
      • The system will then with some probability issue a text message at some period during the afternoon
      • The text will contain a bit.ly link facilitating sharing information and the service with friends / residents
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 7. Theoretical Justifications
      • In both gambling and game design, as well as learning theory, things are well learned if they occur at random intervals (when message is sent) and have unexpected rewards (sunny vs. rainy)
      • To make this part of the Stanford culture, the text messages are localized, and there is a random element of the sunscreen bombing after fountain hopping to make it a memorable/peak experience
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 8. Other Research
      • Background investigation into the ethics of encouraging sunscreen use:
      • http://bit.ly/on-sunscreen
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 9. Shortcomings of Design
      • Not clear what period/intervals work well, Twitter would be useful here but otherwise would require txt messaging infrastructure
      • Will RAs/users eventually discontinue service?
      • Not tied into a particular life trigger, piggybacking off of txt messaging trigger
      • Not everyone has smartphone to consume bit.ly link on mobile device
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 10. Expansion - What else is possible?
      • Other form factors or ID possibilities
        • Sunscreen applicator implement subscribes to Twitter or text messaging feed
        • Use of e-mail vs texting vs IM
        • Sunscreen bottle attaches to backpack / Vitamin D to umbrella?
      • Other features and interactions
        • If enough people subscribe to the service, then there are more gaming possibilities beyond randomly getting texted / sunscreen bombed, for example assigning sunscreen "targets" to users like the Assassins game
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 11. Next Steps in Design Process
      • Contextual interview at RA's room, discover existing health practices / attitudes towards automatic texting
      • Set up automatic randomized texting on a small group with weather data to understand annoying factor
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 12. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation of Design Project How well does the idea reflect concepts from class? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • 13. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation continued… How well could this solution scale to reach many? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does this document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points How insightful is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • 14. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Additional Comments: Overall remarks or additional comments here