SPOUSAL ABUSE
Changing Attitudes• Defined as a problem inthe 1970s• Matters of the home wereprivate•“Not my business”• Until then, consi...
Definitions Victim – has experienced mistreatment by  their partners in the last 5 years.  (physical, emotional, sexual)...
Women’s Rights Pre 1970s Men were allowed to punish their    children/wives using physical violence   If you left your ...
1970s Spousal abuse was recognized as assault. Public opinions drastically changed. Prompted research to determine the ...
Intergenerational Cycle ofViolence
Those who ... Experienced violence Observed violence Child abuse/partner abuse More likely, statistically, to become v...
Violence as Learned If patterns of violence are learned by both  victim and perpetrator, they can be  unlearned. Learn m...
Early Research Focus: Why do women stay in abusive relationships?   Both believe the violence will not happen again. Th...
The Cycle Tension Building   Try to maintain calm, and fulfill partner’s needs.   Builds wit stress or conflict. “tip t...
Factors Contributing Unemployment Financial hardship/bankruptcy Job stress, multiple jobs Demotions, career set backs...
When Men are Victims http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/CTVNewsAt11/2 0030713/stastcan_violenceagainstmen_20030 713/
Question Until the 1970s a “culture of silence”  surrounded matters of partner abuse.  Today, partner abuse is equally  u...
HHS 4M1 - Spousal Abuse
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HHS 4M1 - Spousal Abuse

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HHS 4M1 - Spousal Abuse

  1. 1. SPOUSAL ABUSE
  2. 2. Changing Attitudes• Defined as a problem inthe 1970s• Matters of the home wereprivate•“Not my business”• Until then, considerednecessary discipline.• Social and family valuespressured women to staywith abusive partners
  3. 3. Definitions Victim – has experienced mistreatment by their partners in the last 5 years. (physical, emotional, sexual) Violence – is an actionthat is intended tophysically hurt someone. Intention changesaccording to context.
  4. 4. Women’s Rights Pre 1970s Men were allowed to punish their children/wives using physical violence If you left your husband you were guilty of desertion Lost custody of kids No support offered Social rejection
  5. 5. 1970s Spousal abuse was recognized as assault. Public opinions drastically changed. Prompted research to determine the causes and possible prevention measures Until this time, women had no choice but to stay.
  6. 6. Intergenerational Cycle ofViolence
  7. 7. Those who ... Experienced violence Observed violence Child abuse/partner abuse More likely, statistically, to become victims of violence or inflict it on others.
  8. 8. Violence as Learned If patterns of violence are learned by both victim and perpetrator, they can be unlearned. Learn more effective methods of conflict resolution. Proactive approaches for prevention.
  9. 9. Early Research Focus: Why do women stay in abusive relationships?  Both believe the violence will not happen again. The Cycle of Violence  Repeating pattern of spousal violence experienced by both victim and perpetrator.
  10. 10. The Cycle Tension Building  Try to maintain calm, and fulfill partner’s needs.  Builds wit stress or conflict. “tip toeing” Abusive Incident  Assaults occur, one or more (disbelief builds)  Unpredictable  May require medical help, but usually hidden Calm and Penance  Feels remorse, apologizes, affectionate acts
  11. 11. Factors Contributing Unemployment Financial hardship/bankruptcy Job stress, multiple jobs Demotions, career set backs Downgrading accommodations Child support payments
  12. 12. When Men are Victims http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/CTVNewsAt11/2 0030713/stastcan_violenceagainstmen_20030 713/
  13. 13. Question Until the 1970s a “culture of silence” surrounded matters of partner abuse. Today, partner abuse is equally unacceptable, yet still goes under reported. What other cultural factors might contribute to this under-reporting?

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