Module 1 - Design Thinking Education for Healthcare

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Design Thinking Education for Healthcare
Translating Information into Ideas, Concepts, and Solutions

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Module 1 - Design Thinking Education for Healthcare

  1. 1. 1 /30 ® MODULE 1 Design Thinking Education for Healthcare Translating Information into Ideas, Concept, and Solutions
  2. 2. 2 /30 TABLE OF CONTENTS S E C T I O N 0 1 - INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING S E C T I O N 0 2 - UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS S E C T I O N 0 3 - CASE STUDIES S E C T I O N 0 4 - NEXT STEPS
  3. 3. 3 /30 INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING Design is the process of translating existing situations into preferred ones. S E C T I O N 0 1 • Definition of Design • Levels of Design Thinking • Our Studio Process Model
  4. 4. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 4 /30 definition of design thinking We ask what can we do to change things? That question leads us to design which is the act of changing existing situations into preferred ones. The appropriate blend of qualitative and quantitative thinking with the goal to produce positive change that responds to the needs of consumers. 1 Helps institutions and culture evolve thoughtfully blending continuity and change. 4 Produces comprehensive visualizations of future alternatives allowing for interaction and feedback from stakeholders early in the process. 2 Produces profit for organizations that invest in its use by by developing more efficient processes and improved communication between stakeholders. 5 Reduces the potential for unintended consequences. 3 It is inherently interdisciplinary.6
  5. 5. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 5 /30 Translating an existing situation.... Going Beyond Shallow Decorations GE Healthcare Learning from different experiments that had been done for enhancement of kids imaging and taking it one step further. Looking at the World Through Kids’ Eyes GE Healthcare Understanding Kids’ Anxiety Points During MRI
  6. 6. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 6 /30 GE Healthcare © General Electric Company 2014 Creating Mentors to Help Kids Accomplish Their Mission These characters accompany kids prior, during and post imaging process and build an emotional connection with them. GE Healthcare recognized there had to be a better way to approach children’s imaging. Their global design team began to imagine a scan procedure with less anxiety and fear. Through collaboration with Child Life Specialists from leading children’s hospitals, the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum and award-winning design firms, they worked to develop a pediatric imaging solution that helps improve the patient’s, family’s, and hospital staff’s scan experience. Transforming the Experience into an Exciting Adventure Acknowledging patients’ needs beyond medicine and addressing their needs as individuals. Creating an Entire Story Around the Process Creating 8 different room themes appealing to kids and involving all their senses. ...into a preferred solution.
  7. 7. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 7 /30 Products Broad goals with social/cultural corporate implications Healthcare Systems Directing designers and interdisciplinary teams Converting strategy & insights into objects, images, and action Information Facilities Design Strategy Design Management Design Planning Design Execution and Implementation Levels of Design Management
  8. 8. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 8 /30 Live Well Collaborative Design Studio Process Model Identify Lead-In 0 Research Understand 1 Phase 0 Before the project During the planning stage of a project, the principle investigator identifies the problem space and collaborates with the LWC on the project brief. Phase 4 After the Project Possible future opportunities regarding the project results for the member and LWC. This should also be discussed in Phase 0. Phases 123 During the 15 week Semester The research team focuses on obtaining knowledge about the topic, translates insights into concept ideas and tests and refines concepts to meet the needs of the healthcare sponsor. Consumer and Client Feedback Primary Consumer Research Inspirational & Experiential Research Team and Problem Orientation Secondary Consumer & Product Research Synthesis and Activation Refine Test & Detail 3 Next Steps Continue 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2
  9. 9. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 9 /30 Identify Lead-In Research Understand 0 1 Refine Test & Detail Next Steps Continue 3 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2 • Agree on project scope, objectives, and deliverables. • Establish a multi–disciplinary working team, from both the healthcare sponsor and faculty/student resources from the University of Cincinnati • Identify who the target consumer is, how they will be selected and involved in the process. • Decide on project schedule and identify key interaction dates. Identify Lead-In 0 Project brief from iTransition Sickle Cell Studio - Summer 2012.
  10. 10. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 10 /30 Identify Lead-In Research Understand 0 1 Refine Test & Detail Next Steps Continue 3 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2 • Review the history of the issue. • Identify any existing obstacles. • Collect examples of other attempts to solve the same issue (benchmark). • Talk to your end-users, gather end user insights. • Take into account thought leaders’ opinions (sponsors, experts). Research Understand 1 Student taking notes during an in-clinic interview at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.
  11. 11. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 11 /30 User Interactions & Interviews Week 1 Research Phase Meet & Greet Users In-home, in-clinic or shop along to explore current situation. Week 6 Ideation Co-creation Session Users and students collaborate to create possible solutions. Week 12 Refinement Validation Users give feedback on refined solutions. Week 15 Final Presentation Feedback / Next Steps Students present final solutions to healthcare sponsors and discuss next steps.
  12. 12. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 12 /30 Secondary Secondary research involves the summary, collation and/or synthesis of existing research. It is required in the preliminary stages of research to determine what is known already and what new data is required, or to inform research design. Primary Primary research consists of a collection of original primary data collected by the researcher. At the Live Well our primary research typically includes: • meeting with healthcare professionals • patient interviews • clinical visits • initial & final concept feedback sessions Main Types of Research
  13. 13. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 13 /30 Observational Primary Research Observational research (or field research) is a social research technique that involves the direct observation of phenomena in their natural setting. Personas & Journey Maps Secondary Research Personas are designed as representations of your key audience and are based on interviews and observations with patients. Personas help stakeholders understand the needs, values, behaviors, and expectations of their patients. Journey maps also help stakeholders visualize patients experiences and recognize problems areas during their in-clinic and out-of-clinic experiences. Research Methods
  14. 14. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 14 /30 Identify Lead-In Research Understand 0 1 Refine Test & Detail Next Steps Continue 3 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2 • Identify the needs of your end-users. • Generate ideas to serve these identified needs. • Record all ideas from your ideation sessions. • Do not judge or debate ideas. • Talk one at a time during brainstorming. • Translate insights from research into visualizations. • Incorporate feedback from thought leaders’ opinions. Ideate Conceptualize 2 Information from patients interviews are recorded and mapped into visualizations for CCHMC staff. iTransition Sickle Cell Studio - Summer 2012
  15. 15. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 15 /30 Identify Lead-In Research Understand 0 1 Refine Test & Detail Next Steps Continue 3 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2 • Combine, expand, and refine ideas. • Create multiple drafts. • Seek feedback from a diverse group of people. • Gather feedback from end users. • Create and present actual working prototype(s). • Present a selection of ideas to the healthcare sponsor. Refine Test & Detail 3 Final outcomes from iTransition Sickle Cell Studio - Summer 2012. See pg. 27 case study for more information on this project.
  16. 16. INTRO TO DESIGN THINKING © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 16 /30 Identify Lead-In Research Understand 0 1 Refine Test & Detail Next Steps Continue 3 4 Ideate Conceptualize 2 • Assess if results have met deliverables. • Discuss what could be improved. • Measure success; collect data. • Document and archive the process. • Determine next steps. Next Steps Continue 4 LWC design team presents and receives feedback from the CCHMC project team during the final presentation from iTransition Sickle Cell Studio - Summer 2013.
  17. 17. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 17 /30 UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS Now that you have an overview of design thinking and our process model, it is important to understand how designers think and work. Multi-disciplinary LWC studio projects are led by the college of DAAP (Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning) and are complemented with expertise from the colleges of Business, Engineering, Nursing and Medicine, among many others. In this section, we will discuss design disciplines and their value to our work. S E C T I O N 0 2 • Understanding Designers • Interdisciplinary Team Resources • DAAP Disciplines • Design: Big D’s and Little d’s at DAAP • 3 Types of Design
  18. 18. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 18 /30 uncertainty / patterns / insights clarity / focus design solution research ideation refinement Understand the Design Process Apapted from Central office of Design via Noise Between Stations http://www.designcouncil.info/mt/red/archives/2006/05/a_better_diagra.html
  19. 19. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 19 /30 Multi-disciplinary Team Resources Architecture & Interior Design Art Planning DAAP Master of Design Graphic Communication Design Fashion Design Transportation Design Industrial Design Design Fine Arts Art History Master of Fine Arts Master of Art History Master of Arts in Visual Arts Education Architecture Interior Design Master of Architecture Master of Science Architecture PhD in Architecture Urban Planning Science in Urban Studies Master of Community Planning Horticulture Business Music Nursing Medicine Engineering DAAP Social Sciences
  20. 20. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 20 /30 Design: Big D’s and Little d’s at DAAP The Big D’s are the big picture components of design. Strategy System Service The little d’s are the the resources you use to make up the Big D’s. Industrial Design Communication Design Fashion Design Interior Design Architecture Planning D UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 20 /30 d
  21. 21. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 21 /30 Industrial Design PRODUCT AND TRANSPORTATION Industrial design is concerned with the appearance and usefulness of manufactured goods. When creating products, industrial designers think about technical performance, environmental concerns, human comfort, and aesthetics. They gather deep insights into consumer preferences and values and have the ability to translate insights into comprehensive visualizations of future alternative solutions. DAAP Disciplines d Fashion Design RUNWAY & PRODUCT Fashion designers communicate ideas by fashion sketching, fashion illustration, and through the creation of three–dimensional finished garments that mayappear on the runways or in retail stores. Fashion students are also able to apply their expertise in forecasting trends to other industries as well. Graphic Communication Design PRINT, MOTION, AND INTERACTIVE Graphic communication design is intended to inform, entertain, or persuade a specific audience. Frequently, the designer is called upon to create an entire system of information that may include printed items (advertisements, logos, pamphlets) and/or electronic media to be viewed via a computer, mobile device, film. Graphic communication designers give concrete vision to information, ideas, and feelings by utilizing typography, color, images, layout, animation, editing, and digital interfaces.  
  22. 22. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 22 /30 Planning Planning, also called urban planning or city and regional planning, is a dynamic profession that works to improve the welfare of people and their communities by creating more convenient, equitable, healthful, efficient, and attractive places for present and future generations. The tradition of the school is to train professionals for distinguished practice and spatially–based systems approaches with a focus on “livable places,” that is, on “communities that enrich people’s lives.” DAAP Disciplines d Interior Design Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment. These solutions are functional, enhance the quality of life and culture of the occupants and are aesthetically attractive. Interior Design focuses on the interior spaces of buildings, emphasizing the physical, psychological, and social needs of people at work and leisure. Architecture Architecture is the culturally responsible design and production of buildings that are useful, durable, meaningful, and responsive to their physical and social contexts.  Architecture can refer to the actual product, the architecture of a building or it can refer to the method or style, the knowledge and styles used to design the building.
  23. 23. UNDERSTANDING DESIGNERS © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 23 /30 Service Service design as a practice generally results in the design of systems and processes aimed at providing a holistic service to the user. The purpose of service design methodologies is to design according to the needs of users so that the service is user-friendly, competitive and relevant. Communication Communication design is the effective and efficient transferral of information through the appropriate visual media. Solutions to communication problems may take the form of: a printed document, an audio-visual presentation, interactive smart phone or information systems such as brand identity program, signage system, exhibit design, product identification and wayfinding environmental graphics. Product Product design focuses on the appearance and usefulness of manufactured goods. When creating products, industrial designers think about technical performance, environmental concerns, human comfort, and aesthetics. Results of Work of d’s: Three Types of Design
  24. 24. 24 /30 CASE STUDIES This section provides a series of case studies from Live Well studios that demonstrate how a multi–disciplinary approach to solving problems can be used to generate service, communication, and product solutions, or even a combination of all three. S E C T I O N 0 3 • Product & Service — UC Health Bone Marrow Transplant Center 2013 & 2014 • Product — Ultimate Traveler’s Experience 2011 • Communication — iTransition 2012
  25. 25. CASE STUDIES © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 25 /30 Bone Marrow Transplant Center 2013 Studio Sponsor: UC Health Spatial Design Product Interior Design Watch Design Product Industrial Design Website & App Design Communication Digital Design The goal of this project was to identify patient centered solutions that re-imagine and reinvent the infusion experience to make it a model of care across UCMC. The LWC team developed solutions that are patient centered and improve work processes for clinicians. A key focus of the project was to envision and identify a 5-year ideal state for the clinic. Research Through extensive research via benchmarking other hospital spaces, interviews with staff, patients, and caregivers, and in- hospital observations, the team identified 4 core opportunities for design development. Refinement The final solutions included spatial redesigns of various rooms in the Bone Marrow Transplant Center, and a My Care App that allows patients to manage their health, nutrition, treatment, and schedules all in one place. Ideation The team ideated around these four core opportunities areas which included: the physical space within the hospital, process flow between patients and staff, communication tools between staff, as well as amenities for patients. 1 4 1 2 3 3
  26. 26. CASE STUDIES © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 26 /30 Bone Marrow Transplant Center 2014 Studio Sponsor: UC Health Spatial Design Product Interior Design & Industrial Design Inpatient Journey Map Communication Graphic Design Our goal is to envision patient centered solutions that re-imagine and re-invent the infusion experience to make it a model of care across UCMC. The team also intended to develop solutions to improve work processes and environments for clinicians. Project objectives as continuation of environment redesign from BMTC 2013: • Focusing on the infusion and waiting areas • Refinement of admission and discharge processes • Focusing on better transitions and communication2 1 1 2 Research During the research phase, the LWC team interviewed patients and caregivers during in-clinic visit to understand how they felt about the admissions and discharge process. They also observed doctors and staff members during patient rounds on several occasions in order to better understand how they work. Ideation Based off of the insights they gathered from research, the team ideated around four areas of focus which included: 1) Integration of scheduling and care delivery systems; 2) Medication and prescription management systems; 3) Healing spaces and systems to support patient independence and caregiver needs; 4) Continuity of care processes and management systems. Refinement The team developed an interactive video of what the ultimate experience could be in this space. The team also documented challenges within the admission and discharge process and made recommendations for solutions.
  27. 27. CASE STUDIES © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 27 /30 Ultimate Traveler’s Experience Studio Sponsor: Boeing Vision Video Communication Digital Design Take Me There Chair Product Industrial Design For this project, students were challenged to travel with the “future” traveler to understand opportunities for future travel improvement with the goal of making the “door to door” process easy and seamless for everyone. Take Me Ther Chair: LWC’s first patented application The Take-Me-There Chair is a personalized airport transport vehicle electronically powered with rechargeable batteries. The TMT is connected to the airport information and transportation systems, is fully automated, crash proof, and links to a passenger’s Flight Watch using Blue-Tooth technology. The TMT automatically reads a passenger’s gate destination but can be redirected or paused en route via voice commands or touch screen. The system is ideal for visually impaired passengers; wheelchair bound individuals; and others with special needs. 2 1 1 3 Research Primary research for this project involved interviewing 50+ passengers and those with physical disabilities to better understand their experiences and current issues during their travel journeys. Secondary data was also collected on the air travel process and the roles of airlines in air travel. Ideation The team began ideation with initial brainstorming of the “Perfect Door-to-Door Journey”. Students were encouraged to think outside the box even if their ideas did not seem feasible. Then they organized and prioritized selected ideas and discussed those with the most potential. Refinement During the validation and refinement process, students were required to write a 250 word essay explaining the problem their concept solves or is designed to overcome, how it works, and what technology it uses. Once the concepts were refined, the team created a video narrative which illustrated their vision for the ultimate travel experience by incorporating all of their concepts for products, services, and communication during the travel journey.
  28. 28. CASE STUDIES © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 28 /30 iTransition 2012 Studio Sponsor: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Lori E. Crosby, PsyD Hospital Staff Interface Communication Graphic Design Sickle Cell Visualizations Communication Graphic Design Patient Interface Product & Communication Industrial Design & Graphic Design Research Students used qualitative methods to understand the patient experience of care and the experience of providers administering care. Seven themes were defined based upon secondary research and interviews with patients and providers. Refinement Students designed patient booklets that map out each patients’ daily life, attitudes towards transition, SCD effects on the body, pain management, and their support system. Students also designed transition cards for providers. Care providers arrange the deck of cards to design and visualize a personalized transition process for each patient. Ideation Students conducted an ideation session with providers where they had to divide, subtract, and combine steps of the transition process and identify potential benefits. LWC worked with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to explore innovative ways to improve the transition process for Sickle Cell Disease patients. Translational research in healthcare coupled with the theme of empathic care fueled an opportunity for design to play a role in exploring a qualitative, innovative, use centered approach for developing solutions. The first outcome was developed thorough a co-designed process. Designers working with CCHMC staff and patients to develop a solution that will empower youth to manage their own healthcare. The second outcome is how the staff of CCHMC has learned how to integrate design methods into their everyday operations to improve their healthcare approach. Both of these outcomes have provided the framework of continued and strategic solutions. 1 2 3 1 2 3
  29. 29. CASE STUDIES © Live Well CollaborativeMODULE 1 Design Thinking Education 29 /30 Cincinnati Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center DOCTORS Dr. Punam Malik Dr. Karen Kalinyak Dr. Charles Quinn Dr. Tehodosia Kalfa PSYCHOLOGISTS Dr. Monica Mitchell Dr. Lori Crosby, PI Dr. Naomo Joffe iTransition Resource Map UC Health Hematology ADULT SERVICES AT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL Dr. George Atweh, Medical Director Dr. Olugbenga Olowokure Dr. Donald Rucknagel SOCIAL WORKERS Pam Jenkins NURSE PRACTITIONERS Lana Hackworth NURSE COORDINATORS Connette Birl CCHMC Project Team RESEARCH ASSISTANTS Alexandra Bruck Steven Lenzly Ellen Manegold Aubrey Culp Caravella McCuistian Teresa Smith, CCTST Project Coordinator Megan Dailey Heather Strong Live Well Collaborative Linda Dunseath Craig Vogel PROJECT TEAM Ashley Walton, Design Research Associate/Project Manager Ricardo Elizondo, Graduate Assistant Alixandria Wolfe, Graphic Design Co-op Rachel Lee, Graphic Design Co-op NURSE COORDINATORS Tracy Mahaney Patricia Boyd NURSE PRACTITIONERS Darice Morgan Viia Anderson Peggy Kaiser SOCIAL WORKERS Cheryl Blair Lisa Leace GRADUATE STUDENTS Brigitte Beale Alana Goldstein Sylvia Li Wanting Lou
  30. 30. 30 /30 NEXT STEPS Learn how to integrate design thinking tools and methodologies in your center’s capabilities to achieve desired outcomes. S E C T I O N 0 4 • Module 2 - Gaming Tools and Ideation Frame your challenge using gaming tools and ideation methods. • Module 3 - Intro to an LWC Studio Work with the LWC to frame your project scope, objective, and deliverables. Learn about matching grant funds through the CCTST.
  31. 31. 31 /30 Lori E. Crosby, PsyD Clinical Psychologist, Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology Co-Director, Innovations Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics Live Well Collaborative, Project Principle Investigator Phone: 513-636-4336 Fax: 513-636-7756 Email: lori.crosby@cchmc.org James E. Heubi, MD Director, Clinical Translational Research Center Co-Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training Associate Dean, Clinical and Translational Research Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics Live Well Collaborative, Board of Directors Phone: 513-636-4415 Fax: 513-636-4695 Email: james.heubi@cchmc.org CCHMC Key Advisors Contact To find out more about how you can get involved with Live Well Collaborative, please contact: Linda Dunseath LWC Executive Director ldunseath@livewellcollaborative.org www.livewellcollaborative.org 513.558.7348

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