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Building A Classroom Community2(2)
 

Building A Classroom Community2(2)

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    Building A Classroom Community2(2) Building A Classroom Community2(2) Presentation Transcript

    • Building a Classroom Community By Team Lonatriri Lorien Walley,Nanci Riddle, Trish Ward, Rita Brian
    • Our Beginning Process
      • We chose our topic, building a classroom community, and divided it into four areas.
      • Physical Environment
      • Parent Involvement
      • Connecting classroom community to the greater (school and neighborhood) community
      • Children’s relationships
    • Our research questions
      • How can you create a physical environment to support building a classroom community?
      • What is the importance of parent involvement in the classroom community? Or
      • How do we promote parent involvement in our classroom community?
      • How can I better connect my classroom community to the school and neighborhood communities?
      • Why is this important?
      • In which ways to children's relationships support building a classroom community?
      •  
      • Ask children and their parents to make books for the class culturally relevant and print out teachable rhymes in their native languages.
      •  
      • Relate literacy activities done in class to children’s cultures, languages, and experiences.
      •  
      • Use pictures, photos, and scenes in books as a platform for interaction and discussions.
      •  
      • Label items and learning centers in both English and the children’s home languages, including sign language, picture symbols, and Braille, when applicable to your class.
      •  
      • Have both music and musical instruments from multiple cultures.
      •  
      • Have clothes and foods from many different cultures available for the children to access in the dramatic play center.
      •  
      • Ask parents to record their voice on a blank tape reading a story to the children in their home language.
      •  
      • Ask local community members to come and visit the class and speak to the children.
      •  
      • Take photographs of different sections of the local community, public buildings, parks, businesses, etc.
      How can you create a physical environment to support building a classroom community?
    • How can I better connect my classroom community to the school and neighborhood communities? Teaching about community should be more than including a token unit about “community helpers.” “… As other adults in children’s lives have less time to spend with them and as neighborhoods operate less as communities where people know and help each other, we as teachers have begun to more deliberately provide children with the experience of membership in a community- their school and classroom community- and more focused in helping them acquiring the skills for maintaining community.” (Dalton, Joan and Watson, Marilyn. Among Friends . Oakland: Developmental Studies Center, 1997.)
    • Parent Involvement
      • My philosophy on parent involvement and education is simple. I believe that parent involve is the key element in the successes of every child’s education. Parents are the ones who plant the seed for every child to succeed. They can either make or break a child’s sprit. When parents get involved in the school activities not only do they set a good example to their children but they begin to blossom themselves. They became more self assertive and begin to speak out for the rights of their children and their own. I have seen this first hand. I know a parent that had her little girls in Head Start. She was involved in an abusive relationship but by becoming involved in the school activities and education of her children she was able to break the cycle of abuse and she began to blossom to the point where now she is a single mother that raise 4 girls and just last year she obtain her Master in Human Development. Education is a powerful tool that we all need to take advantage of. We might not all go to college and get a Master but if we have the perseverance and the will to learn we can get as far as we want. If our children see that we as teachers and parent set expectation and goals for ourselves and see that we are trying to accomplish them, then that might be the key they need to see that they too can be whatever they choose.
    • How can I better connect my classroom community to the school and neighborhood communities?
      • Teaching about community should be more than including a token unit about “community helpers.”
      • “… As other adults in children’s lives have less time to spend with them and as neighborhoods operate less as communities where people know and help each other, we as teachers have begun to more deliberately provide children with the experience of membership in a community- their school and classroom community- and more focused in helping them acquiring the skills for maintaining community.” (Dalton, Joan and Watson, Marilyn. Among Friends . Oakland: Developmental Studies Center, 1997.)
      •  
    • To welcome the community into your school/center/class, you can:
      • Make the building available for community groups to use during off-hours
      •  
      • Introduce the mail carrier as s/he delivers mail.
      •  
      • Say “hi” to the UPS deliver person! Children can recognize the uniform from a mile away!
      •  
      • Make sure the children know the names of maintenance workers in the building. If someone is servicing the air conditioning, children are curious!
      •  
      • Make sure than children know the names of all the adults who work in the building. This may take a while in a big school, but children feel safe and important when there are trusted adults to talk to.
      •  
      • Seek out material resources that can be used by the children. Paper, menus, wood scraps, etc. can all be recycled or re-used within a school.
    • To bring your school/center/class into the community, you can:
      • Involve your students in service projects. Young children can help raise money for local charities, they can write letters to businesses and other centers of community, and they can help keep the school clean and healthy.
      •  
      • Take field trips that introduce children to the neighborhood market, veterinarian, shoe store….the possibilities are endless. If your center is not within walking distance of other places of business, find out what the children are interested in and create centers for children to act out their experiences from their home communities- For example, if the children are interested in baking, create a “bakery” in your room.
      •  
      • Take mini-trips to other classrooms within your school. Arrange with another teacher to trade rooms for a little while, or to host a few children at a time. If five year-olds are interested in babies, it might be worth arranging a trip to a toddler room, so the older children can help “care” for the younger ones.
    • Learning about community is central to learning about diversity. Children should gain exposure to different kinds of people doing different kinds of jobs in different ways.
      • “ Though I would not describe three-year-olds as prejudiced, the stereotypes to which they have been exposed become the foundation for the adult prejudices so many of us have.” (Tatum, Beverly Daniel. “ Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria ?” New York: Basic Books, 1997.)
      • Community can instill as sense of belonging, and a feeling that each person matters!
    • Home visits are a strategy used to develop relationships between children and their teachers. On the left is a video that Alexander wanted his teachers to see during his home visit. “Baby” he kept saying. It was at this home visit that Alexander’s teachers found out that he had been born in Russia and this was a video of Alexander when he met his parents for the first time. On the right is Ava, who put her special baby in Katrina’s lap. She got a bottle for the baby and together, Ava and Katrina fed the baby. Ava’s drop off time at school had sometimes been difficult, but after the home visit, Ava’s transition to preschool seemed seamless.
    • The first week of school we gave each family a piece of 8 ½ x 11 black posterboard to create a family collage. Family collages are another strategy we use to promote a sense of belonging. This year we left up the collages from last year for a few reasons. We wanted the children to see the collages to promote conversation. Children would often visit them and we would hear “Mama”, “Dada”, and “Dog”. Children often looked at the collages in groups, fostering relationships. We also wanted the parents to see examples of what we were asking them for, to see there is no ‘right’ way to create the collage. Together, we began putting the images on the wall. Ava and Billy helped tape them to the white board. Ava is pointing to Billy’s mom, saying “Mama”.
    • Resources
      • In progress