¿que tal?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

¿que tal?

on

  • 412 views

Dibuja con paciencia y no dudes que si trabajas ,obtendrás resultados.

Dibuja con paciencia y no dudes que si trabajas ,obtendrás resultados.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
412
Views on SlideShare
412
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

¿que tal? ¿que tal? Document Transcript

  • Brenda Hoddinott O-01 INTERMEDIATE: CARICATURESPlan on having some productive fun giving Gentle an endearing facial expression. Thiscaricature uses three different graduated shading techniques, squirkling, hatching, andcrosshatching, to define the three- dimensional forms and the texture of a face, facialfeatures, and short curly hair.This project is divided into the following two parts:  OUTLINING THE HEAD AND FACE: You render a contour drawing of all aspects of an endearing human cartoon face by setting up your drawing format with a super simple grid of four squares.  SHADING THE FACE AND HAIR: You add the texture of his hair with squirkle graduations, and then use hatching lines to lay down a base of values on his face to identify the various facial forms. You enhance the features and add final touches with crosshatching graduations.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, kneaded and vinylerasers, various graphite pencils such as 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B, and a ruler. Recommended for artists from age 12 to adult with basic drawing skills, as well as students of home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators 10 PAGES – 15 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised - August, 2009)
  • 2OUTLINING THE HEAD ART SPEAKIn this part, you set up your drawing space andAND FACErender a contour drawing of all aspects of an Contour drawing (also called a lineendearing realistic human cartoon face. drawing) is comprised of lines which follow the contours of various sections of a drawing subject and define the outlines of its forms.1. Draw a large square as your drawing Drawing space (also called a drawing space. surface or a drawing format) is the area in which you render a drawing within a specific perimeter. It can be the shape of2. Measure the halfway point on each of the paper or outlined by any shape you the four sides of the square and mark draw, such as a square, rectangle, or them with dots. circle. Shape refers to the outward outline of a3. Divide your drawing space into four form. Basic shapes include circles, squares equal sections to create a very simple and triangles. Draw these lines VERY lightly because grid, by connecting the opposite dots. Proportion refers to the relationship in size you have to erase them later! of one part of a drawing to another or others. Symmetry is a balanced arrangement (sometimes referred to as a mirror image)4. Use an HB pencil to very lightly sketch of lines and shapes on opposite sides of an a large oval shape as close as possible often-imaginary centerline. This will be the outline of Gentle’s head. to the one in my drawing. Use the grid lines inside the drawing space to visually measure spaces so both sides of the oval are Figure 101 the same shape and size (so his head isn’t lop-sided). TIP Drawing circular shapes that are symmetrical isn’t easy! So, before you begin, practice drawing curved lines on some scrap paper. Use the grid lines to measure the spaces, either visually or with a ruler. 5. Use your kneaded eraser to lighten your sketch lines until you can barely see them.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 3TIP Rotate your paper, and look at your drawing from different perspectives. This little trick oftenallows you insight into any problem areas with symmetry. I used a very sharp 4B pencil so my outlines would be dark. Use slightly wiggly lines6. Re-draw the outline of Gentle’s head with nice crisp lines (Figure 102). for the upper part of his head that will later be turned into curly hair. Check that the size and shape of his head is the same size on both sides of the vertical center line. You can even measure with a ruler if you want to be really precise. Don’t draw directly over your sketch lines. Rather, use them as a guide for making a more accurate drawing. Don’t press too hard with your pencil. You have to erase two sections for his ears in the next step. Figure 1027. Use your vinyl eraser to erase sections on either side of his head so you can add his ears.8. Draw the outlines of his Look closely at their shapes. ears (Figure 103). The tops stick out a little farther from the sides of his head than the bottoms. Figure 103 9. Extend the line, which is outlining the tops of the ears, a little inward on his face (Figure 104). 10. Redraw the section of his face (beside his ears) a little closer to the center of his face than it was earlier.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 411. Add an oval shape for his Figure 104 Take note of its size and nose. position in relation to the vertical and horizontal lines.12. Draw the outlines of his Take note that they are eyes (Figure 105). slightly above the center horizontal line. Figure 105 TIP Looking at the reflection of the head and face in a mirror, can help you see areas in need of fixing. Figure 10613. Outline the hairline that separates his hair from his This line is a little wiggly face (Figure 106). rather than smoothly curved.14. Add the irises of his eyes The upper and lower section inside the outlines. of each eye is hidden under his upper and lower eyelids.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 5 The ends of this line are directly below the outside edges of the irises.15. Outline the top of his lower lip (Figure 107). They extend farther outward (toward the sides of his face) than the ends of his eyes.16. With gently curving lines, draw the creases of his upper eyelids above the eyes.17. Add the outlines of his Figure 107 Closer to the center they are eyebrows. thicker and curve upward. His eyebrows are an important component of his facial expression.18. Add another curved line below the line indicating the top of his upper lip (Figure 108). Figure 108 This line marks the lower edge of his lower lip and is shorter and more curved than the other. 19. Draw the two curved smile They begin on either side of lines (Figure 109). his nose and curve outward and downward until they extend slightly past the corners of his mouth. Take note that a space is left between his lips so his mouth appears slightly open with20. Add two curved lines above his lower lip, which represent his upper lip. teeth showing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 6 Figure 109 21. With wiggly lines, add two long oval shapes above his upper lip to represent his mustache (Figure 110). 22. Add his goatee (beard) and the little tuff of hair under his lower lip. 23. Draw a few laugh lines (or smile lines) around his eyes to enhance his facial expression. Figure 110SHADING THE FACEIn this section, you shade theAND HAIRtexture of his hair with squirklegraduations. You then use hatchingand crosshatching graduationslines to add shading to his face toidentify the various facial forms. ART SPEAK Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Squirkling © is a method of shading incorporating randomly drawn curved lines to create textured values and graduated value scales. I chose this name based on the method of morphing squiggles with circles to create shading. Graduated shading (also called graduations) is a continuous progression of values from dark to light or from light to dark. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 7 ART SPEAK Crosshatching is a technique for rendering an infinite range of values within shading, in which one set of lines crosses over (overlaps) another set. Form as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows. Contrast measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading, and creates the illusion of three-dimensions. Reflected light is a faint rim of light reflected or bounced back on an object (especially noticeable on a sphere) from the surfaces close to and around the object, such as the surface on which the object is sitting. Figure 111 TIP Remember, a full range of different values is created by varying the density of the lines, varying the pressure used in holding your pencils, and using various grades of pencils. For refresher courses on various shading techniques, refer to sections D Beginner: Squirkling, F Beginner: Hatching, and L Intermediate: Crosshatching. 24. Shade his hair with graduated The light source is from the right squirkles (Figure 111). in this drawing, so the shading will be a little darker on the left. Use a 4B pencil for the darker hair and a HB for the lighter hair on the right. 25. With a HB pencil, lightly shade the entire face with hatching This first layer of shading is light in value. Hatching lines need to be several different lines (Figure 112). lengths and values. The edges are not abrupt stops, but rather feathered (or ragged) to give a more realistic appearance.26. Press a little harder with you HB pencil to add medium values to the sections of Add these darker hatching lines in between the lighter lines. This shading helps to his face that are in shadow. create three-dimensional forms on his face.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 8 Figure 112 27. Add darker shading to the face with crosshatching and a 2B pencil Don’t forget his lips! (Figures 113 and 114). 28. Add middle and dark values to the Leave the highlight white. The lighter nose. values are closer to the highlight. The tiny glow on the lower left edge of his nose is reflected light. You need to leave this section lighter than the rest. Figure 11329. Use your 4B pencil to add the darker crescent shaped shading on his nose. Figure 114 30. Use a 6B pencil to shade in the Don’t forget to leave the irises of his eyes (Figure 114). highlights white.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 931. Use a 4B pencil to add shading to his eyebrows, mustache, goatee, and the tiny tuff of hair under his lower lip (Figure 115). You can make areas of the face and nose darker by adding more crosshatching lines32. Add final touches to the shading on the hair and face with a 4B. with a 4B pencil. You make sections of the hair darker by simply drawing more squirkling lines with a 4B pencil. You can make areas of the face and nose lighter by patting the shading with your kneaded eraser. Sign your name, write today’s date on the back of your drawing, and put a smile on your face! Figure 115Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  • 10 As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic BRENDA HODDINOTT artist (retired), and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including her favorites: graphite and paint. Brenda is the author of Drawing for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY) and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN). She is currently writing two books on classical drawing. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott<Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. Shedeveloped strong drawing and painting skills through self-directed learning.During her twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, variouscriminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including the RoyalCanadian Mounted Police. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from theRoyal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membershipfrom “Forensic Artists International”.In 2003, Brenda retired from her careers as a forensic artist and teacher to work full timewriting books and developing her website (Drawspace.com). This site is respected as aresource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilitiesthroughout the world.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com