Ecosystems, biotic and abiotic factors

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Ecosystems, biotic and abiotic factors

  1. 1. Introducing<br />
  2. 2. Eco<br />logy<br />Ecology<br />the study of the relationships between biotic and abiotic factors in environments<br />eco (G) root home, abode<br />log, -o, y (G) suffix study of<br />ecoclimate<br />ecosystem<br />ecotourism<br />zoology<br />epidemiology<br />climatology<br />
  3. 3. Ecosystem<br />includes all abiotic and biotic factors in one particular environment<br />Biotic Factors<br />Abiotic Factors<br />the living parts of an ecosystem<br />the nonliving parts of an ecosystem<br />
  4. 4. Bio<br />Biotic Factors<br />include plants, animals, fungi, microorganisms<br />bio(s), bio(t) (G) root life<br />biology<br />biostatistics<br />biography<br />biotechnology<br />biosphere<br />biomechanics<br />biotic<br />biofeedback<br />
  5. 5. Examples of Biotic Factors<br />
  6. 6. A<br />Abiotic Factors<br />include air, water, soil, temperature, wind, source of energy (usually sun)<br />a, an (G) prefix not, without <br />atoxic<br />amoral<br />abiotic<br />amusia<br />
  7. 7. Examples of Abiotic Factors<br />
  8. 8. Examples of Ecosystems<br />Arizona Desert<br />Mountains in Colorado<br />Coral Reef in Belize<br />
  9. 9. Ecosystems<br />do not necessarily have clear boundaries due to biotic and abiotic changes<br />can change daily as things move from one ecosystem to another<br />Biotic<br />Abiotic<br />migration, seed dispersal <br />flood, erosion, drought<br />
  10. 10. Biotic Factors<br />interact with each other in complex ways<br />parasitism mutualism competition<br />such as<br />also interact with abiotic factors in the ecosystem<br />dependent upon water, minerals, temperature, light<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Biome<br />a major regional or global biotic community, a super ecosystem, defined chiefly by the dominant forms of plant life and the prevailing climate<br />
  13. 13. Major Biomes of the World<br />desert<br />grassland<br />tropical rain forest<br />deciduous forest<br />coniferous forest<br />tundra<br />ocean<br />
  14. 14. biome<br />ecosystem<br />community<br />population<br />organism<br />organ system<br />organ<br />tissue<br />Levels of Organization<br />smallest unit of living things<br />group of similar cells organized to work together<br />group of different kinds of tissues working together<br />group of organs working together<br />one individual living thing<br />all organisms of the same kind living in one area<br />all interacting populations in an ecosystem <br />all living and nonliving things interacting within a certain area <br />large region with typical plants and animals that includes several ecosystems <br />cell<br />
  15. 15. Bibliography<br />Arms. (1996). Environmental Science. Orlando,Florida: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.<br />McLaren, James E, and Rotundo, Lisa (1985). Heath Biology. D. C. Heath and Company.<br />The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition. (1992). Houghton Mifflin Company.<br />

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