Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Km Forum Align Km With Land D Goals R101
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Km Forum Align Km With Land D Goals R101

199

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
199
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  Damien Lumby Training, Knowledge, Process Analyst UBS, User Service Centre Primary Email: damien.lumby@ubs.com Alt Email: damien_lumby@yahoo.com.au Tel. +61-449-141 151 http://ubs.com Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 Summary This document supports the KM related presentation provided by Damien Lumby at the NSW KM Forum, 23rd February 2010 Topics covered are:  Reviewing the interaction between the company’s Learning and Development (L&D) and Knowledge Management (KM) processes  Adding value to the L&D function by performing an audit of knowledge across the organization and developing capability based on this analysis  Creating a dynamic environment to support learning  Developing communities and networks to transfer knowledge within the organization Classification Generally accessible Date February 2010 Author(s) Damien Lumby Version 100 Status Released
  • 2.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 Table of Contents 1. Speaker Biography ............................................................................................................. 3 1.1 Who is Damien Lumby? ........................................................................................................ 3 2. Reviewing Process Interaction .......................................................................................... 4 2.1 Write process documents people can read & use................................................................. 4 2.2 Link processes to clarify operations ...................................................................................... 4 2.3 Define and document your roles ........................................................................................... 4 2.4 Avoid combining processes .................................................................................................. 5 2.5 Highlight L&D and KM process interactivity .......................................................................... 5 3. Adding Value via KM Audits .............................................................................................. 6 3.1.1 Encourage a user led KM Audit culture ............................................................................ 6 3.2 Involve L&D in KM Audit Management ................................................................................. 6 3.3 Unlock the established vaults of knowledge.......................................................................... 7 3.4 Ask the right questions, Get the right answers...................................................................... 7 4. Creating Dynamic Environments....................................................................................... 8 4.1 Identify L&D / KM Culture Developers .................................................................................. 8 4.2 Target desirable learning initiatives....................................................................................... 8 4.3 Reward enthusiasm and commitment................................................................................... 8 4.4 Review implemented learning initiatives ............................................................................... 8 4.5 Champion sustainable learning initiatives ............................................................................. 9 5. Developing Knowledge Networks ................................................................................... 10 5.1 Maintain dynamic L&D environments.................................................................................. 10 5.2 Foster sustainable KM pods................................................................................................ 10 5.3 Establish local ownership.................................................................................................... 10 5.4 Monitor daily business activities.......................................................................................... 11 6. Links / References / Recommended Reading................................................................. 12 Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 2 of 12
  • 3.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 1. Speaker Biography 1.1 Who is Damien Lumby? Damien Lumby is an enthusiastic & passionate Knowledge Management, Process & Training professional. Currently working for UBS User Service Centers (IT), Damien has developed his skills over the last 15 years in the Retail, Telecommunications, Education and Information Technology sectors. Damien combines his daily Knowledge Management role with:  Process Analysis,  Technical Documentation,  Non-Technical Documentation  Training & Facilitation When not working, Damien enjoys watching Rugby, playing his beloved guitars and spending as much time as possible with his family & friends. Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 3 of 12
  • 4.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 2. Reviewing Process Interaction 2.1 Write process documents people can read & use Before you are able to successfully understand the interaction between L&D and KM you have to understand the impact of all tasks undertaken during daily business. Too often people document processes in minute detail (Flow charts over 10 – 20 pages etc). These documents are hard to draw, hard to read & hard to manage (one small change in operations will lead to a massive amount of re-work for all process documentation). The documentation of processes should occur in businesses of all sizes & should accurately reflect the high level operations of the main tasks undertaken in the business. NB: An effectively documented process should give you the key elements of knowledge you need to capture (i.e. each task should then give you a header to use for your Knowledge Articles). 2.2 Link processes to clarify operations Clarity in operations will lead to a greater understanding of responsibilities & This clarity will enable you to begin/fix the documentation of role/process based knowledge. Defining the strategic position of the L&D or KM processes (in your process map) can be a daunting challenge for any organization. In the case of L&D and KM processes, understanding the purpose of each process is key to accurately defining the links/co- dominance between them. 2.3 Define and document your roles Appropriately defining roles within your organization will assist you in best mapping out & understanding the impact that your processes (Including L&D / KM Processes) will have on general operations. Your defined roles should have key duties (one of which should be that of ‘KM SME’ for their area of expertise). Roles and processes should be kept separate, mainly because processes may/should cut over multiple roles (Think of the process related to building a car & the number of roles that would be involved in such an activity). Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 4 of 12
  • 5.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 2.4 Avoid combining processes Larger companies generally have a defined L&D role & as a result you may often find that L&D processes will contain elements of the KM process (i.e. as a ‘task’ within a specified role). This may be due to historical organization, an assignment of tasks of the lack of a better alternative and generally works for organizations that do not have dedicated/clear focus on accurate KM. This type of combination undervalues the importance of a living KM process for your organization as such ‘task within a role’ definitions may lead to a knowledge gap once a staff member leaves an organization / role. 2.5 Highlight L&D and KM process interactivity Accurately documenting your KM processes, and ensuring the links between that process and the L&D process will assist you in understanding the importance of KM in your organization.  KM might actually have a higher level of dominance than the L&D function within your organization  L&D function is engaged by the various functions of your business on an ‘as needed’ basis (large operational changes, new joiners, refresher training etc)  KM function is engaged for the ‘living’ management of daily operational information  KM function will work with the L&D function to provide/maintain some of the resources needed during  the L&D activities  L&D function (and all other functions) will supply updated information to the KM function to ensure daily operational instructions are accurately recorded and available on demand Everything is interconnected: the physical world, social systems, your innermost thoughts, the unrelenting logic of the computer— everything forms one immense, interconnected system of reality. Nothing exists in isolation; everything is part of the system; part of a larger context. (Pragmatic Thinking & Learning, Andy Hunt 2008) Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 5 of 12
  • 6.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 3. Adding Value via KM Audits 3.1.1 Encourage a user led KM Audit culture In an organization with a healthy KM culture, minor KM Audits (user led) will be a naturally occurring activity that will ensure operational documents are up to date. (Look for KM System that allows User led KM Audits) Formal KM Audits should be established to ensure that an overall ‘Knowledge Health Check’ is completed on a regular basis (timeframe can be set upon the needs of the knowledge type). The parties involved in such checks can be mixed, however the L&D function should always be involved in such activities due to the impact a significant change in knowledge may have to their deliverables. Your accurately documented operational processes should have left you with a list of key SME’s that would be able to evaluate, update and approve the re-release of KM Articles associated with their operations. 3.2 Involve L&D in KM Audit Management How often have you heard the question ‘What to L&D do when they are not training?’, can you effectively answer this question without providing a simple and unconvincing answer such as ‘we update our documents, we review our training materials’? The L&D function may be most effectively placed in the same organizational group as your KM function & their resources should be allocated to any KM Audits taking place. The learning guru’s in your L&D function are often respected for their overall knowledge of your organizational operations & therefore they may have a certain level of influence on those staff that are impacted by their operations. Utilizing the L&D function in KM Audits will promote a higher level of trust in the accuracy and effectiveness of KM activities and therefore can promote the relevance of a healthy KM culture to the rest of the organization. Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 6 of 12
  • 7.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 3.3 Unlock the established vaults of knowledge Prior to a formalized KM culture being implemented in an organization, individual teams / functions will maintain silo’d KM systems that duplicate information or procedures & processes. Being able to cross over functions via an effectively implemented KM strategy should unlock such libraries and assist in organizations to fully understand the impact that each of their functions has to the overall business model. Knowledge is often hidden for good reasons. Whenever you wish to unlock such hidden knowledge you are bound to encounter fierce resistance from the owners of the repository (‘Key holders’). ‘Ideas without context are like people without responsibility – you just can’t trust them. Ideas have a history, implications, and consequences, all of which should be borne in mind when you encounter them or use them’ (William Sheridan, 2008) Convincing such Key holders to open their repository to the general population can be difficult & should be handled with care, especially when such actions may threaten their sense security. The more freely you distribute ‘globally available’ information via the engagement of your L&D and KM processes (update training & open access information portals) the easier it will be to develop the capabilities of your organization. 3.4 Ask the right questions, Get the right answers L&D teams generally have an ability to gain access to hidden portals of information, mainly because they have assisted the targeted teams with the building of such information from the outset. Part of their skill set involves asking questions to gain the required information (for the building of training) and this can be of great benefit during a KM Audit. ‘Facilitating learning requires a different mentality and range of skills to that of being a fountain of knowledge. It means shifting from a focus on knowing the right answers to asking the right questions’ (Michael McQueen, 2008) This ability & their higher level of access to the required teams may gain much needed information to help streamline knowledge, training and organizational alignment. In the case of international organizations this may lead to particularly significant cost savings (particularly in the IT world) as effectively streamlined operations are realized. Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 7 of 12
  • 8.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 4. Creating Dynamic Environments 4.1 Identify L&D / KM Culture Developers Your process documentation efforts should have delivered a list of roles / personnel that would be able to effectively act as L&D / KM SME’s. These SME’s are generally selected / nominated / employed due to their high level of operational understanding for the related process / task. Often these personnel become SME’s because of their ability to gather / convey information and this should make them perfect for the development of organic / dynamic KM environments. 4.2 Target desirable learning initiatives Dynamic L&D environments should have a focus on developing an organic culture of Knowledge Transfer. This environment should encourage all Knowledge sharing participants to offer their ideas / understanding without ridicule, Ensuring the facilitation of open communications between recognized SME’s and those personnel that may have other valuable information will help breed the kind of openness that can make KM efforts sustainable. 4.3 Reward enthusiasm and commitment All knowledge sharing participants (Including SME’s) that show an interest and an enthusiasm for the transfer of Knowledge (and thus supporting the efforts of the L&D process) should be encouraged in their handling of the role & should be involved in the more formalized L&D activities (if possible). 4.4 Review implemented learning initiatives All Initiatives should be periodically reviewed to confirm relevance, impact and engagement. (Well structured L&D and KM processes should incorporate periodic review steps) Regular reviews will aim ensure that the intended targeted behaviors (knowledge use, gathering and auditing) of a dynamic learning environment are met and will enable you to tweak attitudes / activities that are not meeting these expectations. Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 8 of 12
  • 9.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 4.5 Champion sustainable learning initiatives Dynamic environments thrive when sustainable initiatives are incorporated into the daily L&D / KM business. Not all initiatives are going to work as intended and engaged Knowledge Managers should be willing to retire initiatives that do not achieve the desired results. Employees will generally have a good understanding of their basic L&D / KM needs & organizations could maximize their potential for manageable dynamic environments by gently mining the group wide ideas (Fun, friendly, anonymous online surveys are a good way to do this) Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 9 of 12
  • 10.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 5. Developing Knowledge Networks 5.1 Maintain dynamic L&D environments With L&D and KM so closely interlinked, it’s only sensible to let your Knowledge users help guide the direction of KM in their organization. If you have spent a lot of time and effort drawing processes, gathering knowledge, opening communication channels, sponsoring initiatives & empowering SME’s you will need to encourage and maintain the living nature of the KM culture by being actively involved in some form of its lifecycle. Maintaining a dynamic L&D (and KM) environment will be a lot easier if you utilize your SME’s to continue driving KM change. 5.2 Foster sustainable KM pods Knowledge can usually be grouped into ‘pods’ (entries of a similar nature) Breaking your knowledge into pods will give you a more sustainable level of manageability. All pods should be interconnected (as all knowledge is connected in some way) These Pods should have an allocated SME as a primary contact Look to document other experts that the SME can draw upon when needed (these experts may be the SME’s of other pods). NB: Look to set standard review dates for these pods so that all related articles are reviewed in the same period (helps SME’s understand the full suite of information under their control). 5.3 Establish local ownership Make your SME’s owners of the pods of knowledge, encourage them to take pride in the detail & quality of this knowledge and work towards making such upkeep an element of their yearly reviews. SME’s don’t necessarily need to be from a management level, often the most knowledgeable personnel are those ‘coalface’ employees. Management level personnel should be higher level owners of the overall process. This will assist in gaining their enthusiastic buy in & should ensure the KM process gains enough resource allocation to keep the daily business activities growing. Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 10 of 12
  • 11.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 5.4 Monitor daily business activities As with all initiatives, you should be able to pull some form of statistical data at regular intervals to monitor the successes. Reporting on the success of the knowledge communities & networks may be difficult (from a purely statistical nature) so you should look to other means of gaining the needed data. Consider setting up monthly stakeholder meetings, SME meetings, and User meetings to garner the needed feedback. (Potentially more frequent if you are beginning an initiative). Also utilize the statistics that a Knowledge Management System might be able to provide (authoring, editing and revision statistics are handy to understand which communities are knowledge champions). Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 11 of 12
  • 12.  Generally accessible Aligning KM with L& D Goals NSW KM Forum, February 2010 6. Links / References / Recommended Reading ISO 9001 Help Welcome to ISO 9001 Help. This site was created in 2002 as a project to freely share our knowledge and experience with the world-wide ISO 9000 community and to provide people with the very latest ISO 9000 information and 21st Century quality thinking. (http://www.iso9001help.co.uk/index.htm) The Nextgen Group Nextgen are an international training consultancy based in Sydney, Australia. Nextgen’s mission is to equip generations for greater connection, understanding and engagement. Established in 2004 by leading Australian speaker and bestselling author Michael McQueen, Nextgen specialize in the development and delivery of training resources for the corporate, education and government sectors. (www.TheNexgenGroup.com) Business Balls Free career help, business training, organizational development - inspirational, innovative ideas, materials, exercises, tools, templates - free and fun. (http://www.businessballs.com/index.htm) Creating Knowledge Transparency The guide to studying, learning, thinking & working in the knowledge society, William Sheridan (2008) (http://www3.sympatico.ca/cypher2/WebMindMapBook.pdf) The Official ITIL® Website IT Service Management (ITSM) derives enormous benefits from a best practice approach. Because ITSM is driven both by technology and the huge range of organizational environments in which it operates, it is in a state of constant evolution. Best practice, based on expert advice and input from ITIL users is both current and practical, combining the latest thinking with sound, common sense guidance. (APM Group Ltd, 2009) (http://www.itil-officialsite.com/home/home.asp) Pragmatic Thinking and Learning Refactor Your Wetware (Pragmatic Programmers) (Paperback). By Andy Hunt (Author) (http://www.amazon.com/Pragmatic-Thinking-Learning-Refactor-Programmers/dp/1934356050) Survey Monkey Started in 1999, Survey Monkey is an online survey tool that enables people of all experience levels to create their own surveys quickly and easily. Every day, Survey Monkey gives thousands of people the feedback they need to make more informed decisions, including more than 80% of the Fortune 100. Survey Monkey’s offices are located in Portland, Oregon USA. (http://www.surveymonkey.com/) Getting to Yes Negotiating an agreement without giving in. By Roger Fisher & William Ury (http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Yes-Negotiating-Agreement-Without/dp/0140157352) Damien Lumby, Version 100, Released, February 2010 Page 12 of 12

×