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  • 1- if asked to picture a scientist, most people probably would imagine a professional peering into a microscope or poring over statistics on a computer screen. Science does not belong only to such professionals, however. Ordinary citizens from all walks of life have a huge stake in science and technology as well, which can both enrich their lives with new discoveries and help researchers at the same time. 2-A citizen scientist is a volunteer who collects and/or analyzes data as part of a scientific project.
  • 1- Citizen Science involves the participation of non-scientists in scientific projects.2- Citizen Science is how ordinary citizens(non-scientists) help scientific research by gathering data and in doing so help the society.3- as we know that Humans are often better at pattern recognition than computers, so human eyes are often better than computers at tasks like this.4- Citizen scientists now participate in projects on climate change, invasive species, water quality monitoring, and monitoring of all kinds and a lot more.
  • 1- Increasing realization among professional scientists that citizens represent a free source of skills, & computational power.2- the existence of easily available technical tools for disseminating information about projects and gathering data from the public. Of course the internet is the most significant development, but mobile computing is playing a part too and will probably grow with the spread of smart phones. + Many citizen-science projects are now taking advantage of mobile phones and other consumer electronic devices with recording capabilities for easy data collection
  • 1- Simple example for citizen science project is wikipedia, it allows volunteers to participate in writing articles, almost 27,000,000 articles written by volunteers in 283 languages.
  • There is a huge number of cs projects, in our presentation we chose three projects….1,2,3,
  • 1- you can help make discoveries about the neural structure of the retina.2- Retina: is the part that is absolutely critical for transforming light into neural signals, t is located at the very back of the eye, and its output travels through the optic nerve to the brain.3- Inside the retina, tucked away at the back of the eye, lies an incredibly dense tangle of interconnected neurons. If we can map the many connections between these cells, we will be closer than ever to understanding how vision works.
  • All you have to do is play a relaxing and absorbing game of coloring brain images,online!Anyone can participate – you don’t need any specialized knowledge of neuroscience.It is from this interface that you will explore and color neurons. By tracing neurons we can map their connections thereby creating connectomes. Think of it as a 3-D coloring book. You want to stay within the lines and not cross them.Explain game + end of video
  • his is the time of year when night falls reasonably early, the skies are haze free, outdoor temperatures are pleasant, and summer's bugs have gone away. All in all, it's a great stargazing season.What would make it even more enjoyable for me, and likely for you too, is to somehow get rid of all the light pollution that pervades the modern nighttime sky. The ugly orangy pall of thousands of streelights and security lights has made the truly pristine night sky a rare sight.
  • In This project volunteers from around the world help the scientists to map the light pollution globally while educating participants about the stars.The observers will also learn more about the economic and geographic factors that control light pollution in their communities and around the world.This is the time of year when night falls reasonably early, the skies are haze free, outdoor temperatures are pleasant, and summer's bugs have gone away. All in all, it's a great stargazing season.What would make it even more enjoyable for me, and likely for you too, is to somehow get rid of all the light pollution that pervades the modern nighttime sky. The ugly orangy pall of thousands of streelights and security lights has made the truly pristine night sky a rare sight.(Just last week, the International Dark-Sky Association announced that Exmoor National Park in southwest England has been designated anInternational Dark-Sky Preserve — one of very few to earn that honor to date.)So how starry is your starry night sky? You can find out easily, thanks to a sky-awareness campaign called Great World Wide Star Count. It'll take just 20 minutes or so, and you'll be joined by thousands of equally-curious skygazers around the globe. Do it on your own, with your family, or as part of a larger group.All you'll need are a clear evening sky sometime between October 14th and 28th, your own two eyes, and a set of simple star charts. First, download the handy five-page activity guide (available in 15 languages!) and print the star charts. If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, you'll be looking high up for the constellation Cygnus, and its Northern Cross asterism. If you're south of the equator, the target area surrounds the Teapot in Sagittarius. Each of the seven maps shows stars down to a different magnitude limit, plus one for a cloudy sky.Then, after stepping out under the early-evening sky and letting your eyes adjust to the darkness, match one of the charts to what you see overhead. Step back inside and report what you've found online. You're done! Unlike many contests, you can enter this one more than once! You might be surprised by how much the sky's darkness can vary from night to night, or between locations only 1 or 2 miles apart.Want to find out how quickly your eyes adapt to darkness? You can take a measurement as soon as you step outside, followed by another 15 or 30 minutes later.GWWSC is a managed by UCAR's Windows to the Universe project. The first four years' efforts netted some 16,000 observations from scores of countries. This is a great example of "citizen science" that's helping to raise dark-sky awareness in every corner of the globe.So, again I ask: How dark is your night sky? Join the Great World Wide Star Count and find out!
  • Helps scientists to collect data( reduce cost and time).Helps community members to learn more about their environment. Changes public perceptions of the natural world.Involvement in scientific processes may improve science and technology among citizen science program participants.Improve collaboration and exchange of information.

CitizenScience_Eman_Khawla_Lulwah Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CITIZEN SCIENCETHE POWER OF COLLABORATION Presented by: Eman AlQaissi, Khawla Almzyad, Lulwah AlBarrak
  • 2. No lab coats or degreerequired!
  • 3. What is Citizen science? Projects in which volunteers partner with scientists to answer real- world questions. (Citizen Science Central, Cornell Lab of Ornithology)
  • 4. Factors affecting the growth ofCs Realization among professional scientists that citizens represent a free source of skills, & computational power. Existence of easily available technical tools (Internet and mobile devices).
  • 5. Wikipedia as citizen scienceproject Wikipedia contains 27,000,000 articles written by volunteers in 283 languages.
  • 6. Citizen science projects
  • 7. EyeWire
  • 8. EyeWire You can help make discoveries about the neural structure of the retina. All you have to do is play a relaxing and absorbing game of coloring brain images, online! Anyone can participate, you don’t need any specialized knowledge of neuroscience.
  • 9. EyeWire- Video
  • 10. Great World Wide StarCount
  • 11. What is The Great World Wide StarCount?•Windows to the Universe which is(National Earth Science TeachersAssociation) launched a newcitizen science project in October2007, The Great World Wide StarCount.• It is an international citizen-science event that encourageseveryone, to measure their locallight pollution and report theirobservations online.
  • 12. How Does it Help Scientists?• It is a great example of "citizen science" thats helpingto raise dark-sky awareness in every corner of the globe.• Its goal is to raise the level of public knowledge aboutadverse impacts of excess artificial lighting on localenvironments and help more people appreciate theongoing loss of a dark night sky for much of the world’spopulation.• Investigate the economic and environmental impacts oflight on a local and global scale.
  • 13. Using The Great World Wide StarCount.
  • 14. Nest Watch: NestWatch is a nest-monitoring project used to monitor population trends, nesting phenology, and the behavior of birds across North America. NestWatch invite people of all ages. It engages them in collecting and submitting nest records to the project online database. All observations are compiled to better understand and manage the impacts of environmental change on bird populations. Its management chose citizen-science method for data collection. NestWatch data are publicly available online.
  • 15. NestWatch participationsteps:
  • 16. Citizen Science Benefits Helps scientists to collect data( reduce cost and time). Helps community members to learn more about their environment. Improves collaboration and exchange of information.
  • 17. why Distributed Systems areimportant for Citizen scienceprojects? Distributed system Citizen Science distributesDistributes tasks between the scientists’ work to workers to be done in volunteers to be done in parallel parallel Distributed system Citizen Science involves collaboration involves collaboration In Distributed systems, data is In citizen science, data is gathered by large gathered by large number of number of workers volunteers online. (computers) So the concept of Distributed System is used by Citizen Science to collect, analyze and reach specific results
  • 18. References [1] http://www.unisa.edu.au/barbarahardy/research/citizen- science.asp [2] Alycia W. DEVELOPING AND EVALUATING A NATIONAL CITIZEN SCIENCE PROGRAM FOR INVASIVE SPECIES,2010. University of Wisconsin-Madison. [3] Jonathan Silvertown, A new dawn for citizen science. [4] http://www.unisa.edu.au/barbarahardy/research/citizen- science.asp [5] http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Citizen_scientists.aspx [6] http://citizen-science.blogspot.com/2010/03/human-computing- distributed-thinking.html [7] http://www.openscientist.org/2011/09/finalizing-definition-of- citizen.html [8] http://www.wsg.washington.edu/citizenscience/index.html
  • 19. What are you waiting for!Go and explore the WORLD Thank you!