Mc grawhill.ipodrepair

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  • 1. Front panel Back panelHard drive Battery LCD Click wheel Logic board
  • 2. iPOD REPAIR QuickSteps
  • 3. About the Authors Brandon Jones is the founder of iKaput.com, one of the fastest growing iPod repair companies in the United States. His newest business venture is Sync (synctogo.com), which promises to make life with the iPod easier. Sync’s Web presence and physical locations offer many different services for iPod users, including repair, exchange, and accessories. Marc Campbell is a technology author, graphic designer, and instructor. His popular books on computer topics have appeared around the world in eight languages.About the Technical Editor Guy Hart-Davis is the author of How to Do Everything with Your iPod and iTunes, Fourth Edition and CNET Do-It-Yourself iPod Projects (both published by McGraw-Hill).
  • 4. iPOD REPAIR QuickSteps BRANDON JONES MARC CAMPBELLNew York Chicago San FranciscoLisbon London Madrid Mexico CityMilan New Delhi San JuanSeoul Singapore Sydney Toronto
  • 5. Copyright © 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part ofthis publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher.0-07-159617-8The material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: 0-07-149866-4.All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbol after every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and to thebenefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Where such designations appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps.McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and sales promotions, or for use in corporate training programs. For more information, please contact George Hoare,Special Sales, at george_hoare@mcgraw-hill.com or (212) 904-4069.TERMS OF USEThis is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGraw-Hill”) and its licensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms. Except as permittedunder the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copy of the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, create derivative works based upon,transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense the work or any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your own noncommercial and personal use; any otheruse of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right to use the work may be terminated if you fail to comply with these terms.THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKE NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY OR COMPLETENESS OFOR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK, INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THE WORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE,AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR APARTICULAR PURPOSE. McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in the work will meet your requirements or that its operation will be uninterrupted orerror free. Neither McGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting therefrom.McGraw-Hill has no responsibility for the content of any information accessed through the work. Under no circumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable for any indirect, incidental,special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use of or inability to use the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages. This limitation ofliability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or cause arises in contract, tort or otherwise.DOI: 10.1036/0071498664
  • 6. Professional Want to learn more? We hope you enjoy this McGraw-Hill eBook! Ifyou’d like more information about this book,its author, or related books and websites,please click here.
  • 7. Contents at a Glance Chapter 1 What Kind of iPod Do I Have? ........................................1 Identify exactly which generation of iPod you own, and learn about 1 special editions and other iPod-related gadgets Chapter 2 What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod .......................... 17 Access and decipher the diagnostic menu, interpret icons and warning 2 screens, deal with a frozen iPod, and more Chapter 3 Cracking the Case ..................................................... 29 3 Open your iPod, and put it back together again Chapter 4 Power Issues: Replacing the Battery and Other Power Concerns............................................... 43 Identify and replace a bad battery, and rule out and fix other common 4 power issues Chapter 5 Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens ............ 59 5 Identify and replace a bad LCD, and troubleshoot your new LCD Chapter 6 Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive ......................................................... 79 6 Identify and replace a bad hard drive, and restore your iPod in iTunes Chapter 7 Cranking up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack ................................................................ 93 Identify and replace a bad audio jack, and balance audio quality and 7 storage space Chapter 8 Facing the Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell.................................................................... 103 8 Replace your iPod’s outer casing, or choose to polish the case instead Chapter 9 Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board......... 123 9 Identify and replace a bad logic board Chapter 10 More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software ............................................ 141 10 Enhance the software side of your iPod for entertainment, convenience, and information on the go Index ......................................................................................... 157 Windows XP QuickSteps iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Information v v
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  • 9. For more information about this title, click hereContents Acknowledgments........................................................................xi Introduction .............................................................................. xiii Chapter 1 What Kind of iPod Do I Have? ........................................1 1 Identify Your iPod ..................................................................................................2 Determine Your iPod’s Storage Capacity .......................................................3 Identify a First-Generation iPod ......................................................................3 Identify a Second-Generation iPod .................................................................4 Identify a Third-Generation iPod ....................................................................5 Identify a Fourth-Generation (Monochrome) iPod ......................................6 Identify Your iPod Photo (Fourth-Generation) Color iPod .........................7 Looking at the U2 Special Edition iPod ..........................................................8 Identify Your iPod Video (Fifth-Generation iPod) ........................................8 Considering the Newest iPod ..........................................................................9 Identify Your iPod Mini ........................................................................................9 Identify a First-Generation iPod Mini ..........................................................10 Identify a Second-Generation iPod Mini ......................................................11 Identify Your iPod Nano .....................................................................................12 Identify a First-Generation iPod Nano .........................................................13 Identify a Second-Generation iPod Nano ....................................................14 Understand the iPod Shuffle ..........................................................................15 Chapter 2 What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod .......................... 17 2 Use the Diagnostic Menu ....................................................................................18 Access the Diagnostic Menu on an Older iPod ...........................................18 Access the Diagnostic Menu on a Newer iPod............................................19 Decipher the Diagnostic Menu ......................................................................21 Interpret the Sad Face ..........................................................................................21 Interpret the Folder Icon .....................................................................................22 Check the Signs of a Low Battery ......................................................................23 Interpret the Low-Battery Icon ......................................................................23 Interpret the Low-Battery Warning Screen ..................................................24 Interpret the Low-Battery Symbol.................................................................25 Troubleshoot Other Problems ............................................................................25 Determining Your iPod’s Software Version .................................................26 Interpret the Use iTunes To Restore Screen ..................................................26 Handle a Frozen Apple Logo .........................................................................26 Interpret the Power Icon .................................................................................27 Windows XP QuickSteps iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Information vii vii
  • 10. Chapter 3 Cracking the Case ..................................................... 293 Gather the Tools ....................................................................................................29 Get Ready for Repair Work, or Zen and the Art of iPod Maintenance........................................................................................31 Open Your iPod .....................................................................................................31 Open Your First- or Second-Generation iPod ..............................................31 Open Your Third- or Fourth-Generation iPod or Your iPod Photo ..........33 Open Your iPod Video ....................................................................................33 Open Your iPod Mini ...........................................................................................35 Look at a Brief History of Popular Music ....................................................37 Open Your iPod Nano ..........................................................................................37 Open Your First-Generation iPod Nano .......................................................37 Open a Second-Generation iPod Nano.........................................................38 Put Your iPod Back Together..........................................................................40 Chapter 4 Power Issues: Replacing Your Battery4 and Other Power Concerns ........................................ 43 Check the Signs of a Bad Battery .......................................................................44 Replace the Battery in Your iPod .......................................................................44 Getting and Charging a New Battery ...........................................................45 Replace the Battery in a First- or Second-Generation iPod .......................45 Replace the Battery in a Third-Generation iPod .........................................47 Replace the Battery in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo.........50 Replace the Battery in an iPod Video ............................................................51 Replace the Battery in Your iPod Mini..........................................................53 Replace the Battery in Your First-Generation iPod Nano ..........................56 Still No Power? Try These Fixes ........................................................................57 Chapter 5 Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens ............ 595 Check the Signs of a Bad Screen........................................................................59 Replace Your iPod’s Screen .................................................................................60 Replace the Screen in a First-Generation iPod.............................................60 Get and Troubleshoot a New Screen .............................................................61 Replace the Screen in a Second-Generation iPod ........................................63 Replace the Screen in a Third-Generation iPod...........................................66 Replace the Screen in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo ..........69 Replace the Screen in an iPod Video .............................................................71 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Screen .......................................................................74 Replace Your iPod Nano’s Screen ......................................................................75 Replace the Screen in a First-Generation iPod Nano ..................................75 Replace the Screen in a Second-Generation iPod Nano .............................786 Chapter 6 Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive ......................................................... 79 Check the Signs of a Bad Hard Drive ...............................................................80 Scan Your Hard Drive ..........................................................................................80 Check for Drive Compatibility ..........................................................................81 Get a New Hard Drive ....................................................................................83 viii iPod Repair QuickSteps
  • 11. Replace Your iPod’s Hard Drive ........................................................................83 Replace the Hard Drive in a First- or Second-Generation iPod ................84 Replace the Hard Drive in a Third-Generation iPod ..................................85 Replace the Hard Drive in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo...............................................................................................85 Replace the Hard Drive in an iPod Video ....................................................86 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Hard Drive ..............................................................88 Put the iPod Mini into Disk Mode ................................................................91 Restore Your iPod in iTunes ...............................................................................91Chapter 7 Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack ................................................................ 93 7 Check the Signs of a Bad Audio Jack ...............................................................93 Replace Your iPod’s Audio Jack .........................................................................94 Getting a New Audio Jack ..............................................................................95 Replace the Audio Jack in a Third- or Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo...............................................................................................95 Replace the Audio Jack in an iPod Video .....................................................97 Balancing Audio Quality and Storage Space ...............................................99 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Audio Jack ...........................................................99 Solve Your iPod Nano’s Audio Problems...................................................101Chapter 8 Facing the Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell.................................................................... 103 8 Polishing Your iPod .......................................................................................104 Get a New Front Panel or Shell........................................................................104 Replace Your iPod’s Front Panel ......................................................................105 Replace the Front Panel in a First-Generation iPod ..................................105 Replace the Front Panel in a Second-Generation iPod .............................108 Replace the Front Panel in a Third-Generation iPod ................................ 111 Replace the Front Panel in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo.............................................................................................113 Replace the Front Panel in an iPod Video ..................................................116 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Shell .......................................................................117 Replace Your iPod Nano’s Front Panel or Shell ............................................119 Replace the Front Panel in a First-Generation iPod Nano .......................119 Replace the Shell in a Second-Generation iPod Nano ..............................121Chapter 9 Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board......... 123 9 Check the Signs of a Bad Logic Board ............................................................123 Getting a New Logic Board ..........................................................................124 Replace Your iPod’s Logic Board .....................................................................124 Replace the Logic Board in a First-Generation iPod .................................125 Replace the Logic Board in a Second-Generation iPod ............................127 Replace the Logic Board in a Third-Generation iPod ...............................129 Replace the Logic Board in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo.............................................................................................131 Replace the Logic Board in an iPod Video .................................................133 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Logic Board .......................................................136 Replace the Logic Board in a First-Generation iPod Nano ......................138 iPod Repair QuickSteps ix
  • 12. 10 Chapter 10 More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software ............................................ 141 Check Out iPodLinux ........................................................................................142 Install iPodLinux ............................................................................................145 Record Audio with Factory Earbuds ..........................................................147 Check Out Anapod CopyGear .........................................................................147 Get Anapod CopyGear .................................................................................148 Copy Music Files with Anapod CopyGear ................................................149 Check Out iGadget .............................................................................................150 Get iGadget .....................................................................................................151 Copy Music Files with iGadget ...................................................................152 Get Daily Horoscopes with iGadget ..........................................................153 Get Driving Directions with iGadget ..........................................................154 Get Movie Showtimes with iGadget ...........................................................155 Get Weather Forecasts with iGadget ...........................................................155 Index .......................................................................................157 x iPod Repair QuickSteps
  • 13. Acknowledgments Thanks to Roger Stewart, Carly Stapleton, James Kussow, and the rest of the team at McGraw-Hill, whose professional guidance and personal attention helped us to deliver the best book possible. Thanks to Guy Hart-Davis for a great many valuable suggestions during the editing stage. Thanks to Jody McKenzie, Lisa McCoy, Sam RC, George Anderson, and all who helped to produce this book. “We couldn’t have done it without you” doesn’t quite cover it. Thanks to Neil Salkind, Linda Thornton, Heather Brown, and everyone else at Studio B for getting us going and keeping us there. iPod Repair QuickSteps xi
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  • 15. Introduction QuickSteps books are recipe books for computer users. They answer the question “How do I...?” by providing a quick set of steps to accomplish the most common tasks with a particular program. The sets of steps are the central focus of the book. Sidebar QuickSteps provide information on how to do quickly many small functions or tasks that are in support of the primary functions. Sidebar QuickFacts supply information that you need to know about a subject. Notes, Tips, and Cautions augment the steps, but they are presented in a separate column to not interrupt the flow. Brief introductions are present, but there is minimal narrative otherwise. Many illustrations and figures, a number with callouts, are also included where they support the steps. QuickSteps books are organized by function and the tasks needed to perform those functions. Each function is a chapter. Each task, or “How To,” contains the steps needed for its accomplishment along with the relevant Notes, Tips, Cautions, and screenshots. Tasks are easy to find through: • The Table of Contents, which lists the functional areas (chapters) and tasks in the order they are presented • A How To list of tasks on the opening page of each chapter • The index, which provides an alphabetical list of the terms that are used to describe the functions and tasks • Color-coded tabs for each chapter or functional area with an index to the tabs in the Contents at a Glance iPod Repair QuickSteps xiii
  • 16. Conventions Used in this Book iPod Repair QuickSteps uses several conventions designed to make the book easier for you to follow. Conventions used include: • An icon in the Table of Contents and in the How To list in each chapter references a QuickSteps or a QuickFacts sidebar in a chapter. • Bold type is used for words or objects on the screen that you are to do something with, like click Home, click My eBay, and click Favorites. • Italic type is used for a word or phrase that is being defined or otherwise deserves special emphasis. • Underlined type is used for text that you are to type from the keyboard. • SMALL CAPITAL LETTERS are used for keys on the keyboard, such as ENTER and SHIFT. • When you are expected to enter a command, you are told to press the key(s). If you are to enter text or numbers, you are told to type them.xiv iPod Repair QuickSteps
  • 17. 1 1How to… Determine Your iPod’s 2 Storage Capacity• Identify a First-Generation iPod• Identify a Second-Generation 3 iPod•• Identify a Third-Generation iPod Identify a Fourth-Generation Chapter 1 (Monochrome) iPod What Kind of iPod 4• Identify Your iPod Photo (Fourth-Generation Color iPod) Looking at the U2 Special Do I Have? Edition iPod 5• Identify Your iPod Video The red one? The silver one? Does it really matter? (Fifth-Generation iPod) Considering the Newest iPod Actually, yes. Not so much because of the color, but because 6• Identify a First-Generation of what’s inside. The iPod has been around since 2001, and iPod Mini already there have been multiple generations of products• Identify a Second-Generation leveraging the power of all kinds of different (and sometimes iPod Mini competing) technologies. Today’s iPod might work more or 7• Identify a First-Generation iPod Nano less the same as the classic original did, but what makes each individual generation of iPod work is surprisingly• Identify a Second-Generation different when you get down to it. 8 iPod Nano Understand the iPod Shuffle As with anything high-tech, the closer you look, the more complicated it gets. Before you can attempt to fix your iPod, you need to know exactly what you’re fixing. The parts and 9 even the techniques that you use often change depending upon the model. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? 1
  • 18. 11 Hence, the purpose of this introductory chapter. We’ll get2 you up to speed on what vintage iPod you’re packing. You don’t need a serial number, and you don’t need an instruction manual. All you need is your good sense and the words and pictures herein. We discuss storage capacity, production3 dates, component compatibility, and other identifying features. We also touch on some of the little quirks and details that make iPod ownership less like class consciousness and more4 NOTE like enlightenment. “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door,” written and performed by Bob Dylan, came out in 1973 for the soundtrack to Identify Your iPod5 the film Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid. In two short verses, it invokes the image of a cowboy gunslinger who has October 23, 2001, is one for the history books. It was a Tuesday. On that day, lost his stomach for shooting and killing (perhaps quite literally). Countless artists have covered this song in after decades of armed resistance, the Provisional Irish Republican Army of nearly every style imaginable, from Bob Marley’s reggae Northern Ireland—the PIRA—announced that its members would put their6 version to Guns N’ Roses’ hard-rock version to Roger guns to the ground, that they could not shoot them anymore, as Bob Dylan Waters’ paranoid version. might have described it. (Perhaps it was getting too dark to see.) On One Life to Live, Nora further alienated Sam when he overheard her tell Troy that she wanted him; she meant as a doctor, but Sam assumed otherwise. And Apple7 released its very first iPod. NOTE The PIRA has since ended its armed campaign. Troy was marked for murder, Happy Birthday, iPod! You were born on October 23, 2001. but Sam was accidentally killed in his place, and Nora was able to get on Your sun sign is Scorpio. You have a magnetic personality. with her life, while the iPod has become one of the most successful consumer8 You are intense, creative, and passionate. Your ideal electronic devices ever manufactured. career paths include rock star, cult leader, poet, and confidence artist. You just missed the cutoff for Libras— The iPod has been through four or five generations, depending on how you October 22—so you might be a little wishy-washy. count them (not unlike a soap opera, come to think of it). We show you how to tell them apart in the upcoming sections.910 2 2 PC QuickSteps QuickStepsto Know Your PCiPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Kind of
  • 19. 1 1 NOTE Identify a First- 2As you probably already know, your iPod stores songs as Generation iPoddigital files on an internal hard drive very much like the As we already mentioned, the first-hard drive in a computer. (Later iPods, such as the iPod generation iPod appeared in Octobermini and the iPod nano, do it a bit differently, as you’ll 2001. It came in 5-gigabyte (GB) and 3see later in this chapter.) The GB, or gigabyte, rating 10-GB models.determines the amount of storage space on the drive:the larger the number, the more storage space. The more One of the quickest and easiest ways tostorage space, the more tunes you can keep on the iPod tell if you have a first-generation iPodat a time. So, of Apple’s initial iPod offerings, the 10-GB is to look at the scroll wheel. On the 4iPod had twice the storage capacity of the 5-GB iPod, but first-generation iPod, the scroll wheeleven 5 GB seemed pretty commodious in 2001. is mechanical—it physically moves (see Figure 1-1). No other iPod has this feature. The control buttons—Play/ 5 Pause, Menu, Forward, and Reverse— UICKSTEPS are also mechanical, and they all appear around the scroll wheel.DETERMINE YOUR iPOD’S 6 The first-generation iPod connects toSTORAGE CAPACITY Figure 1-1: On a first-generation iPod,Many iPods have the storage capacity of the hard drive computers and other devices through a the scroll wheel is mechanical, andstamped on the back. If yours doesn’t, or even if it does, FireWire port, which you find at the top the mechanical control buttons appear around it.you can always access this information through the menu. of the unit (see Figure 1-2). Unlike later 7 1. Press the Menu button. models, the first-generation iPod connects 2. Scroll down to the Settings selection. exclusively through FireWire. It does not support any other type of data connection. 3. Find and select the About menu.This causes your iPod to return all kinds of useful 8information, including the number of songs stored,the total hard drive capacity, the hard drive space stillavailable, the software version, the serial number,the model number, and (usually) the format, whether 9Windows or Mac. Figure 1-2: The FireWire port is on the top of the first- generation iPod. 10 iPod RepairPC QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 3 3
  • 20. 11 The LCD—the liquid crystal display, or NOTE2 the iPod’s screen—is in monochrome FireWire, or the Institute of Electrical & Electronics (see Figure 1-3). The first-generation Engineers (IEEE) 1394 interface, is a method of iPod does not display in full color. transferring digital data very quickly. Apple developed Also, the LCD on this iPod is not it in the 1990s primarily for digital video and audio as backlit, and the FireWire port does not3 a cheaper and less messy-with-cables replacement for the dominant Small Computer System Interface have a cover. (SCSI, pronounced skuzzy) interface. As a convenience to the consumer (that’s you), a single FireWire cable Identify a Second- can serve as a power cord as well as a data connection.4 Hence, you can charge your iPod’s battery via FireWire Generation iPod at the same time that you move tunes between devices. The second-generation iPod came out in July 2002 in 10-GB and 20-GB models. This iPod looks very much Figure 1-3: The first-generation iPod’s5 LCD is in monochrome and is not backlit. like the first-generation model, but it has some key differences. Perhaps most importantly, the scroll wheel on the second-generation iPod does not6 physically move; rather, it is touch- sensitive. (All subsequent generations of iPods include this feature.) The control buttons, however, are still7 mechanical. Play/Pause, Menu, Forward, and Reverse appear around the touch wheel in a similar configuration to the first-generation8 iPod (see Figure 1-4). Like the first-generation iPod, the second-generation iPod connects to other devices exclusively through9 its FireWire port, which you find on Figure 1-4: A second-generation iPod has a touch-sensitive pad instead of a mechanical scroll wheel, and the mechanical control buttons appear around it.10 4 4 PC QuickSteps QuickStepsto Know Your PCiPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Kind of
  • 21. 1 1 the top of the unit. Unlike the first-generation iPod, the FireWire port here sports 2 a protective cover (see Figure 1-5). 3 Figure 1-5: The second-generation iPod’s FireWire port 4 comes with a protective cover. As for the LCD of the second-generation iPod, it’s in monochrome and is 5 not backlit.Identify a Third-Generation iPod 6 The third-generation iPod came out in April 2003 and eventually appeared in five different versions: 10 GB, 15 GB, 20 GB, 30 GB, and 40 GB. 7 The four buttons, as well as the scroll pad, are completely touch-sensitive on this iPod—no more mechanical controls. The 8 configuration of the buttons is different here, too. They appear in a row in the middle of the iPod between the LCD Figure 1-6: The buttons on a and the scroll pad, and they light up third-generation iPod are touch- sensitive, they light up, and they 9 (see Figure 1-6). appear in a row between the LCD and the scroll pad. 10 iPod RepairPC QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 5 5
  • 22. 11 The third-generation iPod is the first to have a docking port on the bottom2 (see Figure 1-7). This port enables you to connect the iPod to a docking station for charging or for hooking up to a sound system.34 Figure 1-7: The third-generation iPod has a docking port on the bottom. NOTE The LCD of the third-generation iPod is in monochrome, but it is backlit, which USB stands for Universal Serial Bus. Like FireWire, it’s a makes the display easier to read in the dark or under bright light.5 method of transferring digital data at high speeds. Also like FireWire, it provides power to the connected device This iPod is also FireWire-based, and you need through the data cable. In the second half of the 1990s, to charge its battery through a FireWire cable, USB went through two commercial versions—1.0 and but you can sync (as in synchronize) the iPod 1.1—without being able to touch FireWire’s transfer rates. to a computer through Universal Serial Bus6 All that changed with the release of USB 2.0 in April (USB). Syncing means updating your iPod 2000; USB 2.0 is comparable to and even faster than to match your iTunes playlists or your entire FireWire in some cases. Gradually, USB 2.0 overtook FireWire in popularity to the point that later-generation library. It’s basically about connecting your iPod to your computer and loading music.7 devices from Apple—the creators of FireWire, no less— offer USB ports only. Identify a Fourth-Generation8 (Monochrome) iPod July 2004 saw the release of the fourth- generation iPod in 20-GB and 40-GB models. This iPod sported a Click Wheel instead of9 buttons (see Figure 1-8), which it borrowed Figure 1-8: The fourth-generation from the iPod mini, as you’ll see a bit later iPod has a grey-colored Click Wheel instead of separate control buttons.10 6 6 PC QuickSteps QuickStepsto Know Your PCiPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Kind of
  • 23. 1 1 in this chapter. The Play/Pause, Menu, Forward, and Reverse functions all 2 appear on the grey-colored disc that sits atop mechanical buttons. The fourth-generation iPod includes the docking port from the third generation, and it expands its support of USB beyond syncing. You can fully connect a fourth-generation iPod to another device for recharge as well as data transfer by 3 FireWire or USB. The fourth generation also saw the release of the Apple iPod from HP, or iPod + hp, as it’s sometimes called, which lasted about a year in the marketplace. The LCD of a fourth-generation iPod displays in monochrome and is 4 backlit. The issue gets a little stickier, however, with the introduction of the iPod photo, as you’ll see momentarily. To distinguish the original fourth- generation iPod from the iPod photo, you sometimes hear the unofficial name “iPod monochrome” to refer specifically to the fourth-generation 5 monochrome model.Identify Your iPod Photo(Fourth-Generation) Color iPod 6 The iPod photo with its full-color LCD and capacity for storing and displaying digital photos first appeared in October 2004 as a separate product alongside the standard fourth-generation monochrome iPod. Eventually—in June 2005, 7 to be exact—Apple stopped making the iPod monochrome and dropped photo from the name of the newer product. From that point on, what had once been the iPod photo was now simply the iPod. With the notable exception of the color LCD, the iPod photo looks identical 8 to the fourth-generation monochrome iPod, right down to the docking port (see Figure 1-9). Despite appearances, though, the internal parts of the iPod photo are not compatible with those of a fourth-generation monochrome iPod. The storage capacities of the internal hard drive were different, too, with 20-GB, 9 30-GB, 40-GB, and 60-GB models. On a performance note, audiophiles tend to point to the iPod photo as being the best sounding of all the iPods. 10 iPod RepairPC QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 7 7
  • 24. 11 QUICKFACTS2 LOOKING AT THE U2 SPECIAL EDITION iPOD Hello, hello! The Apple iPod U2 Special Edition brought music fans to where the streets have no name in the3 name of love. It was the perfect lifestyle accessory to How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb, U2’s 2004 studio album, the eleventh from the band. The color scheme coordinated perfectly with Dismantle’s album cover. Flip4 the iPod over, and you found signatures of all four band members—John, Paul, George, and Ringo—and an etched U2 logo. Beneath this ultra-cool exterior beats the heart of a fourth-generation monochrome iPod. But monochrome is monochrome, while color is color.5 In any consumption-crazy, gadget-obsessed culture, the only thing cooler than a U2 monochrome iPod is a U2 color iPod, which also appeared as a special edition. Figure 1-9: The iPod photo has a Outside, it looks like the monochrome U2 iPod, only with color LCD, but otherwise it looks6 a color LCD. Inside, it’s an iPod photo. exactly like the fourth-generation monochrome iPod. If you’re repairing your U2 Special Edition iPod, treat the monochrome version as a fourth-generation iPod, and treat the color version as an iPod photo. Identify Your iPod Video7 (Fifth-Generation iPod) The fifth-generation iPod, also known as the iPod video, the iPod with video, and the iPod 5G, appeared in October 2005 in 30-GB and 60-GB models. It’s the first iPod to support digital video as well as digital photos and digital audio.8 Identifying a fifth-generation iPod is pretty easy. Perhaps most notably, the big, 2.5-inch display on this generation of iPod is a dead giveaway (see Figure 1-10). It comes in either a black or white case with a grey Click Wheel. Just like previous generations, there is a docking port on the bottom.910 8 8 PC QuickSteps QuickStepsto Know Your PCiPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Kind of
  • 25. 1 1 QUICKFACTSCONSIDERING THE NEWEST iPOD 2At the time this book goes to press, the most recent iPod onthe shelves is the Gen 5.5, which came out in September2006. This model is basically the same as the 5G, but itcomes in an 80-GB version and has a 30 percent brighter 3screen. It also does better on battery power when playingdigital video, and it features a music search function.But even more importantly than oxygen and fresh water,a host of brand new, retooled iPods is all set to come outin 2008. The iPod shuffle is slated to appear in four new 4colors. The iPod nano will be redesigned from the groundup. The standard iPod, also redesigned, will come bearinga new name—the iPod classic—and a completely newproduct, the iPod touch, a species of iPod/iPhone hybrid, 5will generate its very first massive quarterly sales.We mention these facts for the sake of completeness.We don’t talk about repairing the newest iPods in thisbook, because our precious few pages are better spent Figure 1-10: The fifth-generation iPod has a 2.5-inch display.covering the older models. If you have one of these 6latest-and-greatest, and if it isn’t working properly, thechances are good that it’s still under warranty, so get yourrepairs made on Steve Jobs’ dime. Identify Your iPod Mini “From a marketing point of view, you don’t introduce new products in August.” 7 That’s what Andrew Card, the first Chief of Staff of President George W. Bush, said to the New York Times when asked why the Bush administration waited NOTE until September 2002 to sound the alarm against a grave and gathering threat.The Microdrive is a miniature hard drive. It was designed True to Mr. Card’s insight, Apple brought out the iPod mini not in August, but in 8to fit in a CompactFlash (CF) slot, like the kind on a February 2004.digital camera. IBM developed the Microdrive in 1999.Other manufacturers have since come out with their own The iPod mini is smaller, thinner, and lighter than the already small, thin,licensed Microdrives, as well as unlicensed, Microdrive-like and light iPod. Its storage capacity rivals that of first-generation iPods, 9alternatives, which most people call microdrives anyway although the iPod mini uses a Microdrive for its internal hard drive.for the same reason that you call all soft paper tissueskleenexes, whether or not Kleenex actually makes them. 10 iPod RepairPC QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 9 9
  • 26. 11 The marketplace saw two generations of iPod minis before the iPod nano2 knocked it into obsolescence. Identify a First-Generation iPod Mini The first-generation iPod mini with its 4-GB Microdrive came in five different3 colors: pink, green, gold, silver, and blue (see Figure 1-11). On the bottom of the iPod mini, you’ll find a docking port, which works just like the one on the iPod proper.456 MENU MENU MENU MENU MENU 9 : 9 : 9 : 9 : 9 :7 4; 4; 4; 4; 4;8 Figure 1-11: The first-generation iPod mini came in five different colors.910 10 10 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Kind of iPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Your PC
  • 27. 1 1 2 3 4 5 Figure 1-12: The storage capacity NOTE of the first-generation iPod mini is not stamped on the back.The Click Wheel first appeared on the first-generationiPod mini. The design and concept of the Click Wheel Unlike all the other previously released iPods, the storage capacity of the iPod 6proved so popular that Apple borrowed it for the fourth- mini is not stamped on the back of the unit (see Figure 1-12).generation iPod. The LCD of the iPod mini is in monochrome and is backlit. The iPod mini can connect and charge through FireWire and USB. 7 Identify a Second-Generation iPod Mini The iPod mini entered the second generation in February 2005 with 4-GB and 6-GB models. These look almost identical to the first generation, but there are a 8 few tell-tale differences. First, the storage capacity of a second-generation iPod mini appears on the back of the unit (see Figure 1-13). Second, the markings on the second-generation iPod mini’s Click Wheel match the color of the casing (see Figure 1-14). 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 11 11
  • 28. 11 NOTE2 The second-generation iPod mini featured a longer battery life than the first-generation iPod mini.3 NOTE4 The internal parts of first- and second-generation iPod minis are not interchangeable.5 Figure 1-14: The markings on Figure 1-13: The storage capacity the second-generation iPod of a second-generation iPod mini mini’s Click Wheel match the6 appears on the back of the unit. color of the casing. The docking port is on the bottom of the unit, and the monochrome LCD is backlit. You connect the iPod mini to other devices through FireWire7 or USB 2.0. Identify Your iPod Nano8 In September 2005, the iPod mini joined the ranks of Intellivision, Betamax, Divx players, and standard-definition TV in the bin for technology products for whom the bell has tolled. The hip new iPod nano replaced it.9 With its flash memory instead of the iPod mini’s Microdrive and the color LCD instead of the mini’s monochrome (and the conspicuous absence of a FireWire port),10 12 12 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Kind of iPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Your PC
  • 29. 1 1 NOTE the iPod nano exuded todayness and set a whole new gotta-have-it itch upon Flash memory differs from other types of digital storage 2 consumers. The iPod nano product line has since gone through two generations. in that it is non-volatile, meaning that it doesn’t require power to retain its stored information. It has been around since the 1980s, but it didn’t really take off until the 21st Identify a First-Generation iPod Nano century due to its being so expensive. Flash memory The first-generation iPod nano came in three models—1 GB, 2 GB, and 4 GB— 3 is generally considered to be the future of data storage and two colors: white with a grey Click Wheel and black (see Figure 1-15). in hard disk systems. The first flash-only hard drives for computers have already appeared. So have hybrid hard drives that combine flash with conventional volatile storage methods. 4 5 MENU MENU 6 9 : 9 : 4; 4; 7 8 Figure 1-15: The first-generation iPod nano came in two colors. The first-generation iPod nano incorporates the same style Click Wheel as the previous iPod mini models. On the bottom of the unit, you find the docking 9 port plus the audio jack (see Figure 1-16). Not everyone is happy with AppleFigure 1-16: Find the first-generation iPod nano’s dockingport—as well as the audio jack—on the bottom of the unit. for putting the audio jack on the bottom, because it isn’t the most convenient 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 13 13
  • 30. 11 place for a headphone connection, although it makes better sense for certain NOTE2 kinds of carrying cases and accessories. The internal parts of first- and second-generation iPod The first-generation iPod nano discontinued iPod’s four-year tradition of nanos are not compatible. FireWire support. USB is now the sole method of connecting the iPod nano to other devices. You can charge your nano’s battery via FireWire, but you get a3 pop-up window that informs you that you can’t make a data connection. Identify a Second-Generation iPod Nano The second-generation iPod nano appeared in September 2006 in a spectrum of4 colors and storage capacities. The 2-GB model came in silver; the 4-GB model came in silver, green, blue, pink, and red; and the 8-GB model came in black and red (see Figure 1-17). Figure 1-17: The second-generation5 iPod nano appeared in a variety of colors, depending on the storage capacity.67 MENU MENU MENU MENU MENU8 9 : 9 : 9 : 9 : 9 : 4; 4; 4; 4; 4;910 14 14 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Kind of iPod Do I Have? iPod Repair Getting What Your PC
  • 31. 1 1 Like the first-generation iPod nano, the docking port and audio jack are both QUICKFACTS 2 on the bottom of the unit (see Figure 1-18), and USB 2.0 is the sole methodUNDERSTAND THE iPOD SHUFFLE of connection.In the world of iPods, there are iPods, iPod minis, andiPod nanos. There are also iPod shuffles. The iPodshuffle is smaller and lighter than the iPod nano; it 3doesn’t even have an LCD display. It has been throughtwo generations since its launch in January 2005.Brandon’s company, Synctogo.com, doesn’t service a lotof iPod shuffles due to the low price point. Most people 4who have an iPod shuffle in need of repair either try to Figure 1-18: The docking port and audio jack are both on the bottom of the second-generation iPod nano.return it if it’s still under warranty or simply throw it awayand get a new one.This is the last that you’ll hear about the iPod shuffle inthis book. 5 6 7 8 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What Kind of iPod Do I Have? PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 15 15
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  • 33. 1How to… 2• Access the Diagnostic Menu on 2 an Older iPod• Access the Diagnostic Menu on a Newer iPod 3• Decipher the Diagnostic Menu•• Interpret the Low-Battery Icon Interpret the Low-Battery Chapter 2 Warning Screen What’s Wrong: 4• Interpret the Low-Battery• Symbol Interpret the Use iTunes To Diagnosing Your iPod Restore Screen 5 Determining Your iPod’s Technology breaks, and humans get frustrated. Sometimes Software Version you don’t know where to start. Sometimes you don’t want to• Handle a Frozen Apple Logo know. You just want your stuff to work like it ought to. 6• Interpret the Power Icon Diagnosing your iPod can be a pain, because it isn’t always an easy or straightforward task. The meanings of the warning icons and screens might not make a whole lot of sense when 7 they appear and interrupt your tunes. Plus, depending on the circumstances, the same icon might mean different things, from hardware issues to software issues. Who wouldn’t get 8 frustrated? This chapter helps you to sort out what’s wrong and take the 9 first steps toward restoring the status quo. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod 17
  • 34. 1 NOTE Use the Diagnostic Menu22 When you’re in the diagnostic menu, the scroll wheel The diagnostic menu presents a battery of technical tests to run when your doesn’t function. To navigate the menu options, use the iPod is on the fritz. It’s invaluable in helping you figure out what’s wrong with Forward and Back buttons instead. your iPod, and it’s often the first stop on the road to recovery. In this section, we show you how to access the diagnostic menu and navigate its options.3 Access the Diagnostic Menu on an Older iPod To access the diagnostic menu on a first-generation, second-generation, or third-4 generation iPod: 1. Reset your iPod by holding down the Menu and Play buttons simultaneously (see Figure 2-1 and Figure 2-2). Don’t be too impatient! You need to hold the buttons for five to eight seconds.567 Press and hold these together to reset89 Figure 2-1: If you have a first- or second-generation iPod, reset it like this.10 18 18 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Diagnosing Your iPod iPod Repair Getting What’s Wrong:
  • 35. 1 2 2 3 4 5Press and holdthese together Press and hold to reset these together until Apple logo appears Figure 2-2: If you have a third- Figure 2-3: Hold down the Forward, 6 generation iPod, reset it like this. Back, and Select buttons until the backwards Apple logo appears. 2. After the iPod shuts down, it should turn back on almost immediately. Once you see the Apple logo appear on the liquid crystal display (LCD), hold down the Forward, 7 Back, and Select buttons simultaneously (see Figure 2-3) until the backwards Apple logo appears. The third-generation iPod makes an audible chirp when you access the diagnostic menu. 3. The next screen asks you to press Play to continue. Press the Play button. You can 8 now select options from the diagnostic menu. Access the Diagnostic Menu on a Newer iPod To access the diagnostic menu on a fourth- or fifth-generation iPod, an iPod 9 photo, an iPod mini, or an iPod nano: 1. Reset your iPod by holding down the Menu and Select buttons simultaneously (see Figure 2-4). You need to hold down the buttons for about eight seconds. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 19 19
  • 36. 1 Press and hold these together until backward Apple logo appear2234 Press and hold these together to reset56 Figure 2-4: Hold down the Menu and Select buttons to reset your iPod. Figure 2-5: Hold down the Back and Select buttons until the backwards Apple logo appears.7 2. After the iPod shuts down, it should turn back on almost immediately. Once you see the Apple logo on the LCD, hold down the Back and Select buttons simultaneously (see Figure 2-5) until the backwards Apple logo appears. You should also hear an8 audible chirp. 3. The next screen asks you to press Play to continue. Press the Play button. You can now select options from the diagnostic menu. If you have an iPod video, press the Menu button to run the tests manually, or press the Previous button to auto-test the iPod. To see the diagnostic menu, press Menu.910 20 20 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Diagnosing Your iPod iPod Repair Getting What’s Wrong:
  • 37. 1 OPTION FUNCTION Decipher the 2 2 5 In 1 Performs multiple tests, including memory, backlight, and the Universal Diagnostic Menu Serial Bus (USB) ports The diagnostic menu is all about choices, choices, Reset Resets the iPod choices, and when you see them, you might feel like Key Checks the keys on the Click Wheel; press a key, and the iPod tells you whether your keypress registered you’re looking at hieroglyphics. If so, let Table 2-1 3 Chgr Curr Uncertain, but it appears to turn the charging methods on and off be your Rosetta Stone. Not all iPods offer the exact Remote Tests the functionality of the remote control; be sure to plug in the remote same diagnostic options, so if you don’t see some of before running this test these in the menu, don’t sweat it too much. Hp Status Checks the state of the hold switch and tells you if there is anything To use the diagnostic menu, navigate the options 4 plugged into the audio jack with the Forward and Back buttons, and press the Sleep Puts the iPod to sleep Select button to select an option. Batt A2D Checks the iPod’s power supply Firewire Checks the FireWire chip 5 HDD R/W Smrt Dat Checks that the hard drive can read and write; returns HDD Pass if it can Performs another hard drive test Interpret the Sad Face When you’re in a bad mood, you probably flash a HDD Scan Scans the hard drive; returns HDD Pass or HDD Fail, depending on the results of the scan sad face. Your iPod does the same (see Figure 2-6). 6 Read SN Reads the iPod’s serial number Its sad face usually appears when there is some Diskmode Puts the iPod into Disk Mode sort of hardware issue. For instance, you might Wheel Returns different values when you run your thumb around the Click see the sad face after you drop your iPod, throw it Wheel at someone, or handle it too roughly. 7 Contrast Checks the contrast of the LCD Audio Displays the audio gain Status Tells you if you have anything plugged into your iPod Drv Temp Displays the temperature of the hard drive 8 Iram Test Test the iPod’s flash memoryTable 2-1: Options in the diagnostic menu 9 Figure 2-6: Your iPod shows a sad face when there is some sort of hardware issue. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 21 21
  • 38. 1 If you’re getting the sad face, check your warranty before you do anything else.22 You should try to get your iPod serviced or replaced under warranty whenever possible. Keep in mind that your warranty won’t cover you if Apple determines that you abused your iPod, which is as good a reason as any to treat your property with care.3 If your iPod is still under warranty, go with that option. If your warranty has TIP expired, or if you voided the warranty yourself by abusing your iPod, read on. Always, always, always make backup copies of your First, bring up the diagnostic menu as described in “Use the Diagnostic Menu” data files, including your music files. Your data are more earlier in this chapter. Scroll down to the HDD Scan option and press the Select4 precious than you think. At least one of your authors has learned the true value of data the hard way—by not button to select it. The iPod scans the hard drive, which can take a while to finish. having adequate backups on hand. Don’t be stupid like When the scan is complete, your iPod returns either HDD Scan Pass or HDD Marc was. Make backups. Scan Fail. A failing grade here means that the hard drive is most likely the5 source of the problem. The good news is that this is something you can fix yourself. We talk about replacing your iPod’s hard drive in Chapter 6. The bad news is that you might lose some data, especially if you don’t have backup copies of your music files somewhere, like on your computer. You do keep6 backup copies, right? A passing grade in the hard drive scan means that your hard drive is fine but that your iPod is probably suffering from a bad logic board. You might think that such a repair is way beyond your skill, but actually it’s as simple as any other7 procedure in this book. We show you how to replace the logic board in Chapter 9. Interpret the Folder Icon8 Occasionally, the iPod’s folder icon (see Figure 2-7) means the same thing as the sad face—namely, a hardware issue—but more often it means that your iPod is having a software issue. Perhaps your iPod’s operating system is not functioning fully or your hard drive is not completely connecting. The chances9 Figure 2-7: The iPod’s folder are pretty good that you can fix your iPod with a minimum of fuss, although icon usually indicates a you might end up having to replace some parts. software issue.10 22 22 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Diagnosing Your iPod iPod Repair Getting What’s Wrong:
  • 39. 1 When you see the folder icon, try resetting the iPod. Hold down the Menu and 2 2 Play buttons (first-, second-, and third-generation iPods) or the Menu and Select buttons (fourth- and fifth-generation iPods, the iPod photo, iPod mini, and iPod nano), and wait about eight seconds. If the folder icon goes away after the iPod restarts, consider the problem solved. 3 If you’re still getting the folder icon, connect the iPod to your computer and try to restore the iPod using iTunes. (See “Troubleshoot Other Problems” later in this chapter for valuable tips about restoring.) If that doesn’t clear up the problem, you might want to check the hard drive 4 connection. To do this, you need to crack open the iPod’s case (see Chapter 3 for details). Once you’ve opened your iPod, disconnect the hard drive connector from the logic board and then plug it back in. Normally, this fix resets the hard drive. It can get the iPod working again—sometimes temporarily, sometimes for 5 the long haul—but you shouldn’t attempt it until you’re more familiar with the procedures in this book. 6 Check the Signs of a Low Battery TIP When John Lennon’s energy was on the wane, he wrote tunes like “I’m SoFor best results, always charge your iPod’s battery with a Tired” for the Beatles. Your iPod shows icons, screens, and symbols instead.wall charger instead of via USB or FireWire. Sometimes 7 Nine times out of ten, you can solve all battery issues simply by plugging in,when the charge is low, your iPod doesn’t have enoughjuice to run its data ports! If the data ports aren’t working just like Dylan did at the Newport Folk Festival. Occasionally, the battery itselfreliably, you can’t use them to draw a charge. is bad, but now we’re getting ahead of ourselves. If your iPod is experiencing power issues, this section gives you a place to start. 8 Interpret the Low-Battery Icon The low-battery icon (see Figure 2-8) normally appears when your iPod’s charge is low. Older iPods—those with monochrome screens—show this icon. When 9 you see it, connect your iPod to your computer or plug it into a wall charger. If charging doesn’t take care of the problem, you might need a new battery. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 23 23
  • 40. 1223 Figure 2-8: The low-battery icon appears when your older iPod’s charge is low. Assuming regular use, an iPod battery lasts about a year to a year and a half.4 Most iPod batteries are rated at 500 full-charge cycles—that’s 500 recharges after depleting your battery completely. But you probably charge your battery while it still has some kick, so those 500 full charges work out to about 1,000 to 2,000 partial charges, depending on how much of the charge you tend to5 use up. If you keep seeing the low-battery icon, or if the charge in your battery doesn’t last as long as it once did, you should get a new battery for your iPod. We talk about replacing the battery in Chapter 4.6 If you get the low-battery icon while your iPod is plugged into the charger, your charger might be bad and you should think about replacing it. You should always go with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) charger7 or one made specifically for the iPod by Apple. Brandon can’t recommend the aftermarket stuff; it’s too unreliable, and it might even fry your iPod’s insides. Low Battery8 Interpret the Low-Battery No battery power remains. Please connect iPod to power. Warning Screen The low-battery warning screen (see Figure 2-9) is the new version of the low-battery icon. It displays9 on all the newer iPods—the ones with a color Figure 2-9: On color iPods, you get the low-battery display, that is—when the iPod’s charge is low. warning screen when the charge is low.10 24 24 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Diagnosing Your iPod iPod Repair Getting What’s Wrong:
  • 41. 1 When you see this warning screen, follow the same steps we outlined in 2 2 “Interpret the Low-Battery Icon”—namely, hook up the iPod to your computer or plug it into a charger. Interpret the Low-Battery Symbol NOTE 3 On some iPods, when the battery is fully (or nearly fully) depleted and youKeep in mind that you don’t have to replace your iPod’s try to connect to a computer through USB, the low-battery symbol appearsbattery yourself. DIY iPod repairs are what this book (see Figure 2-10). Normally, when you see this symbol, you can just leave theis all about—and in many cases replacing the battery iPod connected, and it will eventually charge. Sometimes, the iPod doesn’t 4is so easy that even a rabbit could do it—but you can charge, however, and the low-battery symbol doesn’t go away. If this happensalways get your iPod serviced if that’s what makes to you, purchase a wall charger for your iPod. You might also try leaving yourmore sense for you. iPod on for 24 hours to deplete the battery completely and then plug the iPod into the computer. 5 6 7 Figure 2-10: The low-battery symbol on certain iPods appears when the battery is fully depleted. 8 Troubleshoot Other Problems Your iPod is a complex little bugger, and a lot can go wrong with it. In this section, we look at some additional icons and warning signs, and show you 9 how to fix them. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 25 25
  • 42. 1 UICKSTEPS Interpret the Use iTunes To Restore Screen22 “Connect to your computer. Use iTunes to restore.” Ever come across this DETERMINING YOUR iPOD’S screen? It appears when your iPod is experiencing certain kinds of software SOFTWARE VERSION issues. Not all iPods show this warning. You see it on fifth-generation iPods Your iPod comes with a sophisticated software operating with software version 1.1.2 or later, first-generation iPod nanos with software system, just like your computer does. To see what3 version 1.2 or later, and all second-generation iPod nanos. version of software your iPod is running: 1. Press the Menu button. At the risk of stating the obvious, when you see this screen, you need to restore 2. Scroll down to the Settings selection. your iPod. Restoring the iPod means wiping the disk drive completely clean and reloading the original factory settings. It’s the iPod equivalent of a total system4 3. Find and select the About menu. restore on your computer. You complete this procedure through the iTunes You’ll note that you used the About menu in Chapter 1 to determine your iPod’s storage capacity. software, not through your iPod’s diagnostic menu. To start, simply connect your iPod to your computer and follow the prompts.5 On a Mac, you see a message in iTunes that says, “The software on the iPod ‘My iPod’ is damaged and needs to be repaired before it can be used with iTunes. Would you like to repair your iPod software now?” Click OK to proceed. TIP On a Windows PC, a message pops up that says, “iPod Not Readable. This iPod6 needs to be reformatted for use on your PC. Click on the Update button below Make sure all your music is fully backed up to iTunes to run the application that will allow you to reformat or restore your iPod.” Just before attempting to restore your iPod. Otherwise, you will lose your data. You don’t want that kind of hassle. click Update to proceed.7 Just ask Marc. Handle a Frozen Apple Logo Normally, when you turn on your iPod, the Apple logo appears for a couple of seconds before the iPod loads to the main menu. Occasionally, the iPod gets8 stuck on this logo. If this happens to you, put the iPod into Disk Mode through the diagnostic menu. Then connect the iPod to your computer and update or restore the iPod. Sometimes you can get away with just updating the iPod, so try that first, but9 usually you have to restore the iPod, too. As before, make backups of your music files, because the restore procedure will obliterate them.10 26 26 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Diagnosing Your iPod iPod Repair Getting What’s Wrong:
  • 43. 1Interpret the Power Icon 2 2 Once your iPod has been restored on your computer, you might receive a prompt to plug your iPod into an external power supply. If so, when you disconnect the iPod from the computer, the power icon appears. This isn’t exactly an error; it’s perfectly normal and expected, although you need to deal 3 with it before you can use your iPod again. To make the power icon go away, just plug the iPod into an external power supply. You then see the Apple logo with a progress bar underneath it. Just a little longer now! When your iPod finishes the operation, it should be back to 4 working normally. 5 6 7 8 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps What’s Wrong: Diagnosing Your iPod PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 27 27
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  • 45. 1How to… Get Ready for Repair Work, 2 or Zen and the Art of iPod Maintenance• Open Your First- or Second- Generation iPod 3 3• Open Your Third- or Fourth- Generation iPod or Your iPod photo Chapter 3 Cracking the Case 4• Open Your iPod video Look at a Brief History of Popular Music• Open Your First-Generation Opening your iPod might seem like breaking into the music 5 iPod nano industry (as in impossible without the right connections), but it• Open a Second-Generation really isn’t as bad as all that. In fact, with the right tools and the iPod Nano right state of mind, this is one tough nut that’s easy to crack. Put Your iPod Back Together 6 In this chapter, we show you how to open your iPod. You should read this chapter before proceeding with any other repair in this book. Do yourself a favor, too, and read the 7 instructions for your iPod all the way through before you get down to business. That’s just basic orienteering. If you know where you’re going beforehand, you minimize your chances 8 of getting lost. Gather the Tools 9 Believe it or not, there are actually commercially available tools specifically designed for opening iPods, as shown in the illustration on the next page. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking the Case 29
  • 46. 1 NOTE2 Cracking the case of your iPod voids its warranty for sure, so don’t attempt to do this on any iPod that is under warranty. And no practicing on your sister’s iPod, either.33 These tools are made from plastic, which helps to prevent you from scratching your iPod’s case, and they’re relatively inexpensive as far as tools go, as in4 about ten clams U.S. Finding them takes a bit of diligence. Any place that sells iPod batteries probably also stocks these tools. You can always get them on Brandon’s Web site, www.synctogo.com, or you might try your luck on eBay. NOTE In any event, they’re your best choice for opening the case, but they’re not5 absolutely essential. In a pinch, you can substitute tools that you probably Our technical editor tells us that these plastic tools are already have in your toolbox, but do try to get the plastic ones. called spudgers. In lieu of the plastic tools, go for a small, optical, flat-headed screwdriver—the smaller the better.67 If you’re in need of one of these, Brandon has you covered on www.synctogo .com, or you can go to the local hardware store. When you use the screwdriver8 instead of the plastic tools, you want to be careful. Don’t apply too much force, NOTE or you might damage your iPod. The chances are good that you will at least Torx screwdrivers come in various bit sizes: T4, T5, T6, scratch your iPod no matter how gently you go with the screwdriver, so make T8, T10, T15, and so on. The size you want for iPod a point of finding those plastic tools.9 repair is T6. We mention this because many people acquire Torx screwdrivers in a kit. Make sure your kit For the first-, second-, third-, and fourth-generation iPod, as well as the iPod comes with a T6. photo, if you need to replace the screen (see Chapter 5), the front panel (see Chapter 8), or the logic board (see Chapter 9), you need a T6 Torx screwdriver.10 30 30 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 47. 1 This is a specialty item that you might not have on hand unless you fix cell QUICKFACTS 2 phones. If you’re lucky, your local hardware store stocks them. If not, you canGET READY FOR REPAIR find one online without too much trouble.WORK, OR ZEN AND THE ARTOF iPOD MAINTENANCE If you’re repairing an iPod mini or a second-generation iPod nano, you shouldYou have the tools. You have this book. But do you have round up a small Phillips-head screwdriver. This is in addition to the flat- 3 3the most important element for any repair job? That’s headed screwdriver or the plastic tools.right—we’re talking about your mental game. How’s it Also, with regards to opening the iPod mini and the second-generation iPodgoing in there? Are you calm and focused or frazzledand distracted? And what’s the current status of your nano, consider grabbing your hair dryer. You can use a heat gun if you like, butenvironment? sometimes the gun gets too hot and melts parts of the iPod—not good. Also, 4You wouldn’t attempt to repair your iPod with both hands most people have hair dryers lying around, while heat guns are less common.tied behind your back for obvious reasons. Perhaps less Now, a word of advice: A heat source isn’t absolutely necessary here. You canobviously but for the very same reasons, you shouldn’t usually get away without using one, and because you can end up doing seriousattempt to repair your iPod without giving it your full damage to your iPod, you have ample reason for pause. At the same time, you 5attention. Try to set aside a block of you-time for the job, might find it easier to open your iPod mini or second-generation iPod nano ifwithout the usual million interruptions that come with you apply a little heat, so weigh the pros and the cons, and decide for yourself.day-to-day life. Don’t attempt to squeeze in your repairbetween band practice and baseball over a burrito.Sequester yourself in a room, maybe. Turn off the cell 6phone. Turn off the TV. Take a couple of deep breaths; Open Your iPodit can’t hurt, and it works wonders for ninjas. Some iPods love to pop right open, while some just want to stay closed, butThe place that you choose to repair your iPod feeds back patience rewards all practitioners. Keep at it, and don’t get too frustrated;into your mental game, so choose wisely, grasshopper. anyone can open any iPod. (The same holds true as dating advice.) We talk 7You want good lighting so that you can see what you’redoing. If the available lighting isn’t cutting it, borrow your about the iPod mini and the iPod nano later in this chapter.desk lamp or another portable source.You also want a clean, flat surface to work on. You don’t Open Your First- or Second-Generation iPod 8need the whole kitchen table, for example, but you do To open a first- or second-generation iPod:need more space than the typical cramped computerstation. You’ll be working with electronic components, so 1. Turn the iPod on its side, and measure about two inches from the bottom.avoid excessive dust and static electricity. In fact, doing a 2. Take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and carefully but firmly wedge itlittle dusting beforehand is smart, because it gives you a between the plastic front and the metal back at the position you located in step 1. 9chance to depressurize and ratchet up your mental game. If you have problems, you might try running your tool along the crack and gradually Continued . . . working it in. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 31 31
  • 48. 1 QUICKFACTS 3. Use the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver as a lever to crack open the case GET READY FOR REPAIR2 (see Figure 3-1). WORK, OR ZEN AND THE ART OF iPOD MAINTENANCE (Continued) You also might consider draping a soft cloth over your workspace or working on an oversized mouse pad. This33 way, you minimize the distance that small parts will roll. Then get yourself into a comfortable chair or stool that allows you to move your arms and hands freely. Straighten that back of yours, and put those feet flat on the ground.4 Take another deep ninja breath, and you’re good to go. As you work, you might want to keep a digital camera Figure 3-1: Crack open the case. handy and snap a quick photo of each stage of your repair job. If you get lost, or if you forget exactly where a 4. Carefully slide the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver down the side of the iPod part should go, you can refer back to your photo log and to release all the clips that hold it together (see Figure 3-2).5 clear up the issue. NOTE6 All the step-by-step instructions in this section start off with you measuring two inches from the bottom of your iPod. This is where you’ll insert your plastic tool or flat-7 headed screwdriver. While you can open your iPod from a different spot, two inches from the bottom is the easiest Figure 3-2: Release the clips. and best location in Brandon’s experience. 5. Carefully remove the back from the iPod (see Figure 3-3).8 TIP On a first- or second-generation iPod, the back can get hung up around the audio jack and the hold switch, so be9 careful as you remove it. Also, on a second-generation iPod, sometimes the battery sticks to the back. Gently unstick the battery before you pull the back all the way off. Figure 3-3: Remove the back.10 32 32 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 49. 1Open Your Third- or Fourth-Generation 2iPod or Your iPod Photo To open a third- or fourth-generation iPod or an iPod photo: 1. Turn the iPod on its side, and measure about two inches from the bottom. 3 2. Take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and carefully but firmly 3 wedge it between the plastic front and the metal back at the position you located in step 1. 3. Use the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver as a lever to crack open the case. 4 4. Carefully slide the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver down the side of the iPod to release all the clips that hold it together. 5. Begin to remove the back from the iPod, but don’t take it all the way off just yet. As soon as you can, unplug the audio jack (see Figure 3-4). Do this before completely 5 taking off the back. If you don’t, you can damage your iPod. To unplug the audio jack, try using your fingers, or pry the audio jack with your opening tool if the jack won’t budge. The audio cable attached to the jack is delicate, so easy does it. 6 7 8 Figure 3-4: Unplug the audio jack. 7. With the audio jack unplugged, take the back the rest of the way off.Open Your iPod Video 9 To open your fifth-generation iPod: 1. Turn the iPod on its side, and measure about two inches from the bottom of the unit. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 33 33
  • 50. 1 2. Take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and carefully but firmly2 wedge it between the plastic front and the metal back at the position you located in step 1. 3. Use the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver as a lever to crack open the case. 4. Carefully slide the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver down the side of the33 iPod to release all the clips that hold it together. 5. Gently pick up the back, but don’t take it all the way off just yet. Notice that there are two ribbon cables connecting the back to the logic board of the iPod (see Figure 3-5).456 Figure 3-5: Reveal the ribbon cables.7 6. Unplug the cables from the logic board one at a time (see Figure 3-6). The connectors are held with a clip. Release the clip, and pull the cables8 out. Be very gentle with the cables; they can tear rather easily. 7. With the cables unplugged, take the back the rest of the way off9 (see Figure 3-7). Figure 3-6: Unplug the ribbon cables. Figure 3-7: Remove the back.10 34 34 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 51. 1Open Your iPod Mini 2 To open a first- or second-generation iPod mini: 1. This step is optional, so feel free to skip it. With your hair dryer or heat gun, heat the top and bottom pieces of the iPod mini until they are fairly warm to the touch. Your goal 3 here is to soften up the adhesive behind the plastic. You do not want to deform the 3 plastic or melt it. 2. Carefully pry off the white plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the iPod mini. To do this, wedge your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver between the metal shell and the white plastic pieces (see Figure 3-8). 4 5 Figure 3-8: Pry off the plastic pieces. 6 3. At the top of the iPod mini, you see two small screws: one on each side (see Figure 3-9). With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove both screws. 7 8 Figure 3-9: Remove the screws on the top. 4. At the bottom of the iPod mini, you see a small piece of metal. You need to remove 9 it, but don’t worry. It should come out easily enough. The piece of metal is spring- clipped in place. Dislodge the two clips; a screwdriver works better here than your 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 35 35
  • 52. 12334 Figure 3-10: Pry out the piece of metal on the bottom. plastic tool. Then pry out the piece of metal with your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver (see Figure 3-10).567 Figure 3-11: Unplug the Click Wheel connector. 5. Behind the piece of metal, you see the button of the Click Wheel.8 Gently—for the love of Janis, gently—unplug the Click Wheel connector (see Figure 3-11). 6. Carefully push from the bottom, and slide the insides of the iPod mini out through the top (see Figure 3-12) as you hum “Within9 You Without You” from Sgt. Pepper. Figure 3-12: Slide out the insides.10 36 36 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 53. 1 Open Your iPod Nano 2 How you go about opening an iPod nano depends on the generation. First- generation iPod nanos go much like the regular iPod, while second-generation iPod nanos are much like the iPod mini, as this section shows. 3 3 Open Your First-Generation iPod Nano To open a first-generation iPod nano: QUICKFACTS 1. Turn the iPod nano on its side, and measure about two inches from the bottom of the unit. 4LOOK AT A BRIEF HISTORY 2. Take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and carefully but firmly wedge it intoOF POPULAR MUSIC the side of the iPod nano at the position you located in step 1.It’s hard to overstate the importance of Sgt. Pepper’s 3. Use the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver as a lever to crack open the case.Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Beatles’ eighth album 4. Carefully slide the plastic tool or the flat-headed screwdriver down the side of the iPod 5from 1967, which introduced the casual listening crowdto the edgy sounds of experimental and psychedelic nano to release all the clips that hold it together.music that were creeping about the London underground 5. Remove the back from the iPod nano (see Figure 3-13).at the time. Without Sgt. Pepper, it’s safe to say that therewouldn’t have been an audience for Pink Floyd outside of 6a few dank basements in Canterbury and the Bohemianclubs of central London.Without a larger audience for Pink Floyd, there wouldn’thave been the increasingly bloated, musically suspectPink Floyd world tours of the 1970s. 7Without those, there wouldn’t have been anything toturn ordinary John Lydon into the disaffected, snarling,I-Hate-Pink-Floyd-T-shirt-wearing Johnny Rotten.Without Johnny Rotten, there wouldn’t have been the 8Sex Pistols, and without the Sex Pistols, there wouldn’thave been punk rock.Without punk rock, there wouldn’t have been new wave,post-punk, college rock, alternative rock, pop punk, emo, Figure 3-13: Remove the back. 9and on and on and on and on, and we’d all be listening toLawrence Welk and Barbara Streisand. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 37 37
  • 54. 1 Open a Second-Generation iPod Nano2 To open a second-generation iPod nano: 1. This step is optional, so feel free to skip it. With your hair dryer or heat gun, heat the TIP top and bottom pieces of the iPod nano until they are fairly warm to the touch. As with the iPod mini, you want to soften up the adhesive that holds the plastic, not deform the3 Sometimes you can heat the plastic pieces sufficiently3 plastic or melt it. by pressing the iPod nano between your hands. 2. Carefully pry off the plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the iPod nano by wedging your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver between the metal shell and the plastic pieces. 3. At the top of the iPod nano, you see two small screws, one on each side (see Figure 3-14).4 With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove both screws.56 Figure 3-14: Remove the screws on the top.7 4. At the bottom of the iPod nano, you see two more small screws (see Figure 3-15). With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove those as well.89 Figure 3-15: Remove the screws on the bottom.10 38 38 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 55. 15. Pull out the audio jack, but don’t pull it all the way out, because it is attached by a 2 ribbon cable (see Figure 3-16). Handle both the jack and the cable carefully. 3 3 4 5 Figure 3-16: Pull out the audio jack.6. Under the audio jack, you find another screw that was previously hidden. Take out this screw as well (see Figure 3-17). 6 7 8 9 Figure 3-17: Remove the screw under the audio jack. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 39 39
  • 56. 1 7. Take out the small metal bracket that surrounds the docking port by prying it gently UICKSTEPS2 with your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver (see Figure 3-18). PUT YOUR iPOD BACK TOGETHER All the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t do33 diddley for Humpty Dumpty, but your iPod isn’t a large, anthropomorphic egg, so you don’t need to call out the cavalry. To close the case back up when you’re done making your repairs, simply run the instructions for opening the4 case in reverse. Figure 3-18: Remove the small metal bracket.5 8. Disconnect the audio jack from the logic board. (This step can be a little sketchy, because you can’t completely see what you’re doing.) To do this, take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and carefully pull the audio-jack connector toward the front of the iPod until the connector comes unplugged (see Figure 3-19). However, do not remove the audio jack from the iPod, as it is still connected to6 the Click Wheel.789 Figure 3-19: Disconnect the audio jack from the logic board.10 40 40 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC iPod Repair Getting Cracking the Case
  • 57. 19. Very carefully take your plastic tool or flat-headed screwdriver, and push the logic 2 board through the casing (see Figure 3-20). Note that the Click Wheel and audio jack remain inside the casing. 3 3 4Figure 3-20: Slide the logic board through the casing. 5 6 7 8 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cracking Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know the Case 41 41
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  • 59. 1How to… Getting and Charging 2 a New Battery• Replace the Battery in a First- or Second-Generation iPod 3• Replace the Battery in a Third- Generation iPod• Replace the Battery in a Fourth-Generation iPod Chapter 4 Power Issues: Replacing 4 4 or an iPod Photo• Replace the Battery in an iPod Video Your Battery and Other• Replace the Battery in Power Concerns 5 Your iPod Mini• Replace the Battery in Your First-Generation iPod Nano With a little luck, your most pressing power concerns these 6 days are reducing your carbon shoe size and hoping that they don’t re-form Power Station. If you’re experiencing additional power troubles—for example, with regards to your iPod— 7 perhaps this chapter can be of service. Whenever the words iPod and power come up in the same sentence, Brandon immediately thinks of the battery. 8 Replacing iPod batteries is one of the most common repairs that his company Synctogo.com makes, because, over time, the battery is the component most likely to fail. 9 As far as repairs go, replacing the battery isn’t especially technical. In fact, for most iPods, it’s probably the easiest 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns 43
  • 60. 1 NOTE repair in this entire book, although, as you’ll see, the going2 gets tougher with the iPod mini and the iPod nano. Power Station—a pop rock supergroup featuring solo-star vocalist Robert Palmer, Duran Duran’s John Taylor and Andy Taylor (unrelated) on bass and guitar, and Chic’s Occasionally, the battery isn’t the source of your power drummer Tony Thompson—made something of a splash trouble. We conclude this chapter with suggestions and3 in the 1980s with their hit singles “Some Like It Hot” and advice for dealing with non-battery power concerns. “Get It On (Bang a Gong)”—but have you listened to their album lately? That crisp percussive sound is the mousse cracking on their hair cuts. The group attempted an ill-advised comeback album and tour in the 1990s Check the Signs of a Bad Battery44 before calling it quits. Palmer and Thompson have since What makes a battery go bad? A troubled home environment? Actually, it’s passed away. These men will be missed. Their music, not not so sad a story. Your battery goes bad naturally just from regular use. It has so much. a lifetime of about a year to a year and a half, or about 500 full-charge cycles. After that, it starts to show its age.5 The most common sign that your battery is ready to be replaced is that it TIP doesn’t hold a charge for as long as it once did. You find yourself plugging in your iPod more regularly, and the battery seems to get depleted more quickly. To prolong the life of your battery, make sure not to6 overcharge your iPod. In other words, dont constantly Another sure sign is that the low-battery warning appears constantly on your recharge the battery when you still have plenty of power iPod’s liquid crystal display (LCD). Whether you get an icon or a warning left, and let the battery drain down to zero every once screen depends on your model of iPod. See Chapter 2 for details. and a while.7 You might also find that your iPod works fine when you plug it into a charger, but that it dies immediately when you attempt to run it from the battery. In this case, your battery isn’t just dying; it’s dead. Time for a replacement. TIP8 If all your power issues disappear when you run your Replace the Battery in Your iPod iPod from a charger instead of the battery, the battery Table 4-1 shows the required tools and the difficulty level for replacing the battery is almost certainly the source of your woes. If your iPod in an iPod. We talk about the iPod mini and the iPod nano in subsequent sections doesn’t seem to power up even after you plug it into a in this chapter.9 charger, you’re probably looking at a bad logic board (but do check the charger first). We show you how to replace the logic board in Chapter 9.10 44 44 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 61. 1 iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL 2 First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Easy Second-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Easy Third-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Easy Fourth-generation iPod (monochrome) iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Easy 3 iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Easy iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Moderate Table 4-1: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Battery in an iPod 4 4 QUICKFACTS Replace the Battery in a First- orGETTING AND CHARGING Second-Generation iPod 5A NEW BATTERY To replace the battery in a first- or second-generation iPod:Finding a new battery for your iPod isn’t as hard as itmight seem. A quick Internet search should turn up all 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3.kinds of sources, or you can just make it easy on yourself 2. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 4-1).and buy your battery from the one you can trust— 6Brandon at Synctogo.com. Expect to pay between $30and $40 U.S., depending on the battery and the vendor.Not all batteries work in all iPods, so be sure to get theone that goes with your specific model. When in doubt, 7ask. You gain nothing by guessing in this case.Unfortunately, your new battery doesn’t come charged.After you replace the battery, you need to charge itbefore you can use it. To do so, simply connect your 8iPod to your computer or (even better) to a wall charger.Charging takes about three to four hours. 9 Figure 4-1: Unplug the battery from the logic board. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 45 45
  • 62. 1 3. Pull the battery from the iPod (see Figure 4-2). A small piece of adhesive holds the2 battery in place, so you might need to apply a little force. 4. Plug the new battery into the logic board (see Figure 4-3).344 Figure 4-2: Remove the battery from the iPod.5 Figure 4-3: Plug in the new battery. 5. Put the new battery where the old one was, exactly as it was (see Figure 4-4).6 6. Put the iPod back together.789 Figure 4-4: Put the new battery into place.10 46 46 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 63. 1 Replace the Battery in a Third-Generation iPod 2 To replace the battery in a third-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Disconnect the audio jack (see Figure 4-5). If you don’t disconnect the audio jack, you will have problems. 3 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector (see Figure 4-6). 4 4 5 6 Figure 4-6: Remove the hard drive.Figure 4-5: Disconnect the audio jack. 4. Unplug the hard drive connector from the logic board (see Figure 4-7). 7 8 9 Figure 4-7: Disconnect the hard drive connector. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 47 47
  • 64. 1 5. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 4-8).23445 Figure 4-8: Unplug the battery. 6. Remove the battery from the iPod (see Figure 4-9).678 Figure 4-9: Remove the battery.9 Figure 4-10: Put the new battery into place. 7. Put the new battery where the old one was, exactly as it was (see Figure 4-10).10 48 48 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 65. 1 8. Plug the new battery into the logic board (see Figure 4-11). 2 3 4 4 Figure 4-11: Plug in the new battery. 5 9. Plug the hard drive connector back into the logic board (see Figure 4-12). 10. Slide the hard drive into the hard drive connector (see Figure 4-13). 6 7 8 9Figure 4-12: Plug in the hard drive connector. Figure 4-13: Slide the hard drive back in. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 49 49
  • 66. 1 11. Plug the audio jack back into the logic board (see Figure 4-14).2 12. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Battery in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo3 To replace the battery in a fourth-generation iPod or an iPod photo: 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Disconnect the audio jack from the logic board. 3. Carefully slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector.44 4. Unplug the battery. Figure 4-14: Plug in the audio jack. 5. Carefully remove the battery from the iPod (see Figure 4-15). The battery is glued down with some adhesive; you will most likely need to pry it out with your plastic opening tool or flat-headed screwdriver.5678 Figure 4-15: Remove the battery. 6. Place the new battery in the iPod (see Figure 4-16). 7. Reconnect the battery cable, and make sure to tuck it away properly. Normally, you place the cable under the logic board.9 Figure 4-16: Put the new battery in the iPod.10 50 50 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 67. 1 8. Slide the hard drive back into the hard drive connector. Make sure that the hard drive is 2 fully connected; you don’t want a loose connection. 9. Plug the audio jack back into the logic board (see Figure 4-17). 10. Put the iPod back together. 3 4 4 Figure 4-17: Reconnect the audio jack. 5 Replace the Battery in an iPod Video To replace the battery in a fifth-generation iPod: 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 6 2. Disconnect the battery from its connector (see Figure 4-18). Notice the small clip; carefully pull it up. 7 8 9Figure 4-18: Unplug the battery. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 51 51
  • 68. 1 3. Carefully lift up the hard drive (see Figure 4-19).2 4. Still holding the hard drive, unclip the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 4-20).344 Figure 4-19: Lift up the hard drive.5 Figure 4-20: Release the audio jack. 5. Carefully pry the battery from the back of the iPod (see Figure 4-21). The battery is glued into place.6 6. Place the new battery on the back of the iPod (see Figure 4-22).789 Figure 4-21: Pry off the battery. Figure 4-22: Place the new battery.10 52 52 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 69. 1 7. Plug the audio jack back into the logic board (see Figure 4-23). 2 8. Plug the new battery into the logic board (see Figure 4-24). 9. Put the iPod back together. 3 4 4 5 6Figure 4-23: Plug in the audio jack. Figure 4-24: Plug in the new battery. Replace the Battery in Your iPod Mini 7 A bad battery in an iPod mini poses a bit more of a challenge (see Table 4-2), but don’t let that deter you. You have our full confidence. You can succeed in this task. 8 iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL First-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools, small Phillips-head Moderate screwdriver, flat-headed screwdriver Second-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools, small Phillips-head Moderate screwdriver, flat-headed screwdriver 9 Table 4-2: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Battery in an iPod Mini 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 53 53
  • 70. 1 To replace the battery in either generation of iPod mini:2 1. Open the iPod mini, and slide out the logic board according to the directions in Chapter 3. 2. Locate the battery (see Figure 4-25).3445 Figure 4-25: Here is the battery in the iPod mini. 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 4-26).6789 Figure 4-26: Unplug the battery.10 54 54 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 71. 1 TIP 2In case of doubt, the battery is the component notlabeled Microdrive. 3 4 4 5 Figure 4-27: Remove the battery. 6 4. Remove the old battery from the logic board (see Figure 4-27). 5. Place the new battery into the iPod mini. 6. Connect the new battery to the logic board. 7. Slide the logic board back into the mini’s shell (see Figure 4-28). 7 8 9 Figure 4-28: Slide the logic board back in. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 55 55
  • 72. 1 8. Put the iPod mini back together. Replace the screws in the top, put the metal clip back2 in the bottom, and place the plastic pieces on the top and the bottom, just as you found them. There should be enough adhesive to attach these pieces. If not, try a little rubber cement. Replace the Battery in3 Your First-Generation iPod Nano The iPod nano is super-small, which makes replacing its battery something of a test for the non-repair professional—not only because of the size, but also4 because you need to solder the battery to the logic board (see Table 4-3). If you4 don’t have access to a soldering iron, or if the idea of soldering your iPod nano doesn’t exactly fill you with confidence, you might be better off leaving this one to the pros.5 iPOD NANO MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL First-generation iPod nano iPod-opening tools, soldering iron, solder Hard Second-generation iPod nano Not advised Do not attempt6 Table 4-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Battery in an iPod Nano In this section, we give step-by-step instructions for replacing the battery in your first-generation iPod nano. We don’t even touch replacing the battery in7 the second-generation nano, because the steps are too hard for a non-pro, and if you make a mistake, you can easily do permanent damage to your iPod. Also, don’t try to use the procedure for the first-generation nano for replacing the battery in a second-generation nano, because the steps aren’t the same. Find yourself an iPod repair service instead.8 To replace the battery in a first-generation iPod nano: 1. Open your iPod nano according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Locate the battery (see Figure 4-29). It’s soldered to the logic board.9 Figure 4-29: The battery in an iPod nano is soldered to the 3. Carefully remove the battery from the logic board (see Figure 4-30). You will need to logic board. pull the wires off.10 56 56 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Replacing Your Battery and Other Power Concerns iPod Repair Getting Power Issues:
  • 73. 1 4. With your soldering iron, solder the new battery onto the logic board (see Figure 4-31). 2 5. Put the iPod nano back together. 3 4 4Figure 4-30: Remove the battery. Figure 4-31: Solder the new battery onto the logic board. 5 Still No Power? Try These Fixes Always install a new battery first to resolve any iPod power issues. If the new battery doesn’t seem to do the trick, then you might try the following: 6 • Double-check all the connections for the new battery. Sometimes a wire can come loose, or it might be pinched. If so, your iPod might not be able to power on. • If all the connections are good, try charging your iPod overnight through the wall charger. 7 • If that doesn’t work, try a new charger. • If that doesn’t work, try restoring your iPod with the latest iPod software through iTunes. See Chapter 2 for more information about restoring. If you’ve tried all these suggestions and you are still experiencing power 8 problems—your iPod isn’t holding a good charge, or your iPod isn’t powering on even when you plug it into a charger—then most likely a bad logic board is the culprit. See Chapter 9 for how to replace it. If the battery icon goes away but you start getting different icons or warning 9 messages, see Chapter 2 for information on interpreting the icons. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Power Issues: ReplacingQuickSteps and Other Power Concerns PC Your Battery Getting to Know Your PC 57 57
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  • 75. 1How to…• Replace the Screen in 2 a First-Generation iPod Get and Troubleshoot a New Screen 3• Replace the Screen in a Second-Generation iPod• Replace the Screen in a Third-Generation iPod Chapter 5 Can’t See a Thing: 4• Replace the Screen in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo Replacing Broken Screens• Replace the Screen in 5 5 an iPod Video• Replace the Screen in Remember when Kilroy flipped the switch on his laser video a First-Generation iPod Nano and saw Dr. Righteous staring back at him? Obviously, the• Replace the Screen in a screen on his laser video was working just fine. Hopefully, you 6 Second-Generation iPod Nano can say the same for the screen on your iPod, but if you can’t, this chapter is for you. In it, we show you how to remove your iPod’s broken liquid crystal display (LCD) and install a brand- 7 new one. Check the Signs of a Bad Screen 8 A bad screen is fairly easy to diagnose. When you turn on your iPod, you see what looks like an inkblot in the display. Sometimes it seems to be a large crack or a flood of ink, while other times it looks more like a little sliver (see Figure 5-1). 9 Either way, your LCD needs to be replaced. You don’t break open the screen itself and try to clean up the spilled ink. You just pop out the old screen and install a new one. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens 59
  • 76. 1 Replace Your iPod’s Screen2 Table 5-1 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the screen on an iPod. We discuss the iPod mini and the iPod nano later on in this chapter. DIFFICULTY3 iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED LEVEL First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Second-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver4 Third-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Fourth-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate iPod (monochrome) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver55 iPod photo (fourth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate Figure 5-1: A broken LCD looks something like this. generation color iPod) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver iPod video (fifth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Hard generation iPod) screwdriver and Phillips-head screwdriver6 Table 5-1: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Screen in an iPod Replace the Screen in a First-Generation iPod7 To replace the screen in a first-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions8 in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive (see Figure 5-2). There is adhesive holding it down. 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board9 (see Figure 5-3). Figure 5-2: Pull the battery from the hard drive. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange Figure 5-3: Unplug the battery. hard drive connector.10 60 60 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 77. 1 5. Pull the hard drive from the iPod (see Figure 5-4). NOTE 2Kilroy Was Here, the 1983 concept album from Americanpseudo-progressive quasi-rockers Styx, tells the storyof a world gone wrong, where self-righteous ideologuesenjoy absolute rule, pseudo-progressive quasi-rock stars 3are imprisoned for exercising their First Amendmentrights, and androids called robotos handle all the blue-collar jobs. It sold millions of copies. (And it was thefirst album that Marc ever bought. Hey, he was 12.) Thefirst single from the album, the inimitable “Mr. Roboto,” 4awash in synthesizers and light disco stylings, occupiesa strange place in pop music history, as it will never beforgotten despite its near-total lack of musical content. 5 Figure 5-4: Pull out the hard drive. 5 6. Find the four T6 Torx screws in the logic board. A large piece of rubber covers one of them; remove the rubber to expose the fourth screw (see Figure 5-5). QUICKFACTS 6GET AND TROUBLESHOOTA NEW SCREENYour best bet for acquiring a new screen for your iPodis to do an Internet search. To save yourself a little time 7and effort, Brandon sells replacement screens at www.Synctogo.com. You might also check eBay for bargains. ScrewThe cost of a new screen varies widely, depending on theiPod model and the supplier. You’ll pay anywhere from 8$30 to $100 U.S. Monochrome screens for older iPodsare generally less expensive than the color displays forlater models.Sometimes, after you install a new screen, the displayappears grainy. Just reset your iPod, and this problem 9should clear right up. Figure 5-5: Remove the piece of rubber to expose the fourth T6 Torx screw. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 61 61
  • 78. 1 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all four screws (see Figure 5-6).23 Screw455 Figure 5-6: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 8. Remove the logic board from the bottom of the iPod (see Figure 5-7). 9. The screen has four white clips: two on each side of the logic board. These clips hold6 the screen in place. Disconnect them (see Figure 5-8). Figure 5-7: Remove the logic board.789 Figure 5-8: Unclip the screen. 10. Find the connector for the screen underneath the scroll wheel. Carefully unplug this Figure 5-9: Unplug the screen from the logic board. connector with your iPod-opening tool or small flat-headed screwdriver (see Figure 5-9).10 62 62 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 79. 1 11. Connect the new screen to the logic board. 2 12. Connect the four white clips, and make sure they’re holding the screen in place. 13. Screw in all four T6 Torx screws to the logic board. 14. Slide the hard drive back into the hard drive connector. 15. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 3 16. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Screen in a Second-Generation iPod 4 To replace the screen in a second-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive. There is adhesive holding it down. 5 5 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector. 5. Notice the two small brown clips next to the hard drive connector. Pull down on them to loosen the connector, and remove it from the logic board (see Figure 5-10). 6 6. Pull the blue piece of rubber from the iPod (see Figure 5-11). 7 8 9Figure 5-10: Remove the hard drive connector. Figure 5-11: Pull out the piece of rubber. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 63 63
  • 80. 1 7. Loosen the scroll wheel’s connector by pulling down on the brown tabs, just like you2 did with the hard drive connector in step 5 (see Figure 5-12).3455 Figure 5-12: Loosen the scroll wheel’s connector. 8. Remove all eight T6 Torx screws from the logic board (see Figure 5-13).678 Screw9 Figure 5-13: Remove the T6 Torx screws.10 64 64 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 81. 1 9. Carefully lift the logic board enough to release the scroll wheel’s connector 2 (see Figure 5-14). 10. Remove the logic board (see Figure 5-15). 3 4Figure 5-14: Release the scroll wheel’s connector. 5 5 6 Figure 5-15: Remove the logic board. 11. Release the white side clips holding the screen to the logic board (see Figure 5-16). 7 8 9 Figure 5-16: Unclip the screen. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 65 65
  • 82. 1 12. Carefully unplug the connector holding the screen to the logic board (see Figure 5-17).23455 Figure 5-17: Unplug the screen from the logic board. 13. Connect the new screen. 14. Place the logic board back in the iPod, and screw in all eight T6 Torx screws.6 15. Plug in the scroll wheel’s ribbon cable. 16. Reattach the hard drive connector, and replace the blue piece of rubber. 17. Slide the hard drive into place.7 18. Plug the battery into the logic board, and place the battery on top of the hard drive. 19. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Screen in a Third-Generation iPod8 To replace the screen in a third-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 5-18). 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector, and remove the hard drive from the9 Figure 5-18: Unplug the audio jack. iPod (see Figure 5-19).10 66 66 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 83. 1 4. Unplug the hard drive connector from the logic board, and remove it from the iPod 2 (see Figure 5-20). 3 Plug 4 Connector 5Figure 5-19: Remove the hard drive. 5 Figure 5-20: Remove the hard drive connector. 5. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 5-21). 6. Remove the battery from the iPod (see Figure 5-22). 6 7 8 Figure 5-22: Remove the battery. 9 Figure 5-21: Unplug the battery. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 67 67
  • 84. 1 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all six screws from the logic board2 (see Figure 5-23). 8. Remove the logic board from the front of the iPod (see Figure 5-24). A connector holds the logic board in place. There’s no special technique here; just unplug the connector.3 Screw Screw Connector4556 Figure 5-23: Remove the T6 Torx screws.7 Figure 5-24: Remove the logic board. 9. Notice the back of the screen. Unplug the screen from the front of the iPod, and remove the screen (see Figure 5-25). 10. Plug in the new screen.8 11. Plug the logic board back into the front of the iPod. 12. Replace all six T6 Torx screws. 13. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 14. Plug the hard drive connector back into the logic board.9 Figure 5-25: Unplug the screen.10 68 68 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 85. 1 15. Slide the hard drive back into the connector. 2 16. Plug the audio jack back in. 17. Snap the iPod back together. Replace the Screen in a Fourth-Generation 3 iPod or an iPod Photo To replace the screen in a fourth-generation monochrome iPod or an iPod photo: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 4 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 5-26). 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector, and remove the hard drive from the iPod. 5 4. Unplug the battery from the logic board, and remove the battery (see Figure 5-27). 5Figure 5-26: Unplug the audio jack. 6 7 8 Figure 5-27: Remove the battery. 5. Remove the black tape covering the hard drive connector (see Figure 5-28). Keep this 9 piece of tape, because you’ll need it later.Figure 5-28: Remove the tape. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 69 69
  • 86. 1 6. See those exposed T6 Torx screws? There are six of them in a fourth-generation2 monochrome iPod, and there are five of them in an iPod photo. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove them all (see Figure 5-29). 7. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the Click Wheel to the logic board (see Figure 5-30). This is the ribbon cable on the bottom.3 Screw Screw455 Figure 5-30: Unclip the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable. 8. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the screen to the logic board (see Figure 5-31).6 This is the ribbon cable on the top.7 Figure 5-29: Remove the T6 Torx screws.8 Connector9 Figure 5-31: Unclip the screen’s ribbon cable.10 70 70 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 87. 1 9. Remove the logic board from the iPod (see Figure 5-32). 2 10. Pull the screen from the iPod (see Figure 5-33). 3 4 Figure 5-32: Remove the logic board. 5 5 Figure 5-33: Remove the screen. 11. Put the new screen in place. 12. Put the logic board back in. 6 13. Connect the new screen to the logic board. 14. Reconnect the Click Wheel to the logic board. 15. Replace all the T6 Torx screws. 16. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 7 17. Replace the black tape over the hard drive connector. 18. Plug the audio jack back in. 19. Put the iPod back together. 8Brown clip Replace the Screen in an iPod Video To replace the screen in a fifth-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 9 2. At the bottom of the unit, find and disconnect the ribbon cable from the battery (see Figure 5-34). Be sure to pull the cable near its connection point; don’t use the fingers in the figure as a guide. There is a brown clip that you can pull up to make the Figure 5-34: Remove the battery cable. cable easier to remove. Be gentle with this clip, though, as it can pop off. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 71 71
  • 88. 1 3. Find and disconnect the ribbon cable from the audio jack (see Figure 5-35). This2 connector also has a brown clip that works like the one in step 2. 4. Carefully lift the hard drive and rotate the hard drive out of the iPod casing, disconnect it using the black clip, and remove it (see Figure 5-36).34 Figure 5-35: Remove the audio jack cable.55 Figure 5-36: Remove the hard drive.6 5. Once the hard drive is removed, unclip the screen from the logic board (see Figure 5-37). Use the brown clip as needed. 6. Notice the six Phillips-head screws—three on each side—that hold the front of the iPod to the frame. Remove all six screws (see Figure 5-38).7 Screw89 Figure 5-37: Unclip the screen. Figure 5-38: Remove the screws.10 72 72 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 89. 1 7. Separate the front of the iPod from the screen and the logic board (see Figure 5-39). 2 3 4 Figure 5-39: Remove the front of the iPod. 5 5 8. Pull the screen out of the logic board (see Figure 5-40). 6 7 8 Figure 5-40: Remove the screen. 9. Put the new screen where the old one was.10. Put the front of the iPod back onto the frame. 911. Replace the six Phillips-head screws. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 73 73
  • 90. 1 12. Clip the screen’s ribbon connector down.2 13. Plug the hard drive back into the hard drive connector. 14. Reattach the audio jack ribbon cable into the connector on the logic board. 15. Rotate the hard drive, and place it in the iPod. 16. Plug the battery’s ribbon cable back into the logic board.3 17. Put the iPod back together. Replace Your iPod Mini’s Screen4 If your iPod mini’s screen is giving you trouble, you don’t have to grin and bear it. Exercise your First Amendment rights and replace it. Table 5-2 shows the required tools and the difficulty level.5 iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL5 First-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Moderate and small Phillips-head screwdriver Second-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver Moderate and small Phillips-head screwdriver6 Table 5-2: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Screen in an iPod Mini To replace the screen in a first- or second-generation iPod mini, follow these steps:7 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Four clips—two per side—attach the screen to the iPod mini. Unclip them to release the screen (see Figure 5-41). 3. The screen is connected to the logic board by ribbon cable, which is slid into a8 small, brown clip. Release the brown clip, and the ribbon cable slides out easily (see Figure 5-42). 4. Connect the new screen, and clip it back into place on the logic board. 5. Slide the logic board back into the shell.9 Figure 5-41: Unclip the screen.10 74 74 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 91. 1 6. Plug the Click Wheel back into the logic board. 2 7. Put the screws back in the top. 8. Replace the metal clip at the bottom of the iPod mini. 9. Replace the plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the iPod mini. 3 Cable Connector Replace Your iPod Nano’s Screen We turn now to the iPod nano. You’ll recall from Chapter 4 that the 4 nano isn’t the easiest component to fix, so, as you might expect, replacing the screen is on the tricky side (see Table 5-3). Fortunately, you don’t have to solder anything this time around. If you read all the 5Figure 5-42: Disconnect the screen’s ribbon cable. instructions thoroughly beforehand and take the repair work nice and 5 slow, you shouldn’t run into problems. iPOD NANO MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL 6 First-generation iPod nano iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver and small Hard Phillips-head screwdriver Second-generation iPod nano iPod-opening tools or flat-headed screwdriver and small Very hard Phillips-head screwdriver 7 Table 5-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level of Replacing the Screen in an iPod Nano Replace the Screen in 8 a First-Generation iPod Nano To replace the screen in a first-generation iPod nano: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Three screws hold down the logic board. With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove 9 these screws (see Figure 5-43). 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 75 75
  • 92. 1 Screw234 Figure 5-44: Release the battery. Figure 5-43: Remove the screws. 3. Release the battery from the logic board (see Figure 5-44). Use your iPod-opening55 tool, because the battery is glued down. Do not completely remove the battery from the logic board, because it is soldered in place. 4. Carefully pull the screen from the front panel (see Figure 5-45). The screen is glued down with adhesive.6 5. Notice the ribbon cable that connects the front of the iPod nano to the logic board. Release the clip, and unplug this ribbon cable to free the logic board (see Figure 5-46). Then pull the logic board from the iPod nano.7 Figure 5-45: Pull off the screen.8 Clip9 Figure 5-46: Remove the ribbon cable, and pull out the logic board.10 76 76 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 93. 16. Release the side clips that hold the screen to the logic board (see Figure 5-47). There 2 are two on each side. You should be able to use your fingers. 3 4 5 Figure 5-47: Unclip the screen. 57. Locate the ribbon cable that connects the screen to the logic board, and unclip this ribbon cable (see Figure 5-48). 6 7 Cable Connector 8 Figure 5-48: Disconnect the screen from the logic board. 98. Attach the new screen to the logic board, and plug the ribbon cable into its connector.9. Plug the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable back into the logic board. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing BrokenYour PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Screens 77 77
  • 94. 1 10. Place the logic board back into the iPod nano.2 11. Replace the three screws. 12. Put the iPod nano back together. Replace the Screen in3 a Second-Generation iPod Nano To replace the screen in a second-generation iPod nano: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. With your iPod-opening tool or flat-headed screwdriver, carefully remove the screen4 from the metal bracket (see Figure 5-49). 3. Unclip the screen from the logic board, and remove the screen from the iPod nano (see Figure 5-50). 4. Plug the orange ribbon cable into the new screen.55 5. Attach the new screen to the metal bracket. Figure 5-49: Remove the screen from the metal bracket. 6. Carefully slide the logic board back into the casing. 7. Reattach the audio jack to the logic board.6 Cable Connector 8. Replace the screw under the audio jack. 9. Place the metal bracket back into the bottom of the iPod nano. 10. Slide the audio jack back into place. 11. Replace the bottom and then the top screws.7 12. Put the top and bottom plastic pieces back into place.89 Figure 5-50: Unclip the screen from the logic board.10 78 78 iPod Repair QuickSteps Can’t See a Thing: Replacing Broken Screens PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC
  • 95. 1How to… Get a New Hard Drive 2• Replace the Hard Drive in a First- or Second-Generation iPod 3• Replace the Hard Drive in a Third-Generation iPod• Replace the Hard Drive in a Fourth-Generation iPod or Chapter 6 Storing Tunes and Such: 4 an iPod Photo• Replace the Hard Drive in an iPod Video Sorting Out Your Hard Drive Put the iPod Mini into 5 Disk Mode The hard drive is perhaps the most crucial component of your iPod, because that’s where it stores your music files. If your hard drive goes rogue on you, you can’t listen to your tunes, 6 6 in which case your iPod becomes a very expensive (if stylish) keychain ornament. Replacing a bad hard drive gets you back into the groove. We show you how in this chapter. 7 This chapter also marks the first opportunity for you to put your iPod through a little elective surgery. Even if your hard drive is functioning perfectly, you might consider replacing it 8 anyway with a newer, higher-capacity drive. It’s often cheaper than buying a brand-new iPod. In fact, if you don’t mind getting your hands dirty, you can upgrade your iPod’s storage 9 capacity beyond the highest factory rating. How’s that for a personalized lifestyle gadget? 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive 79
  • 96. 1 NOTE Check the Signs of2 Your iPod nano stores tunes on flash memory, not a conventional, volatile hard disk system, so there’s no a Bad Hard Drive hard drive to replace. Hence, we don’t discuss the iPod Hard drives go bad from wear and tear. The disks, or platters, inside a hard nano in this chapter. drive physically spin at an insane rate of speed, which is 3,600 times per minute3 on the slow side. Before you’ve used your iPod for five hours, the platters might have spun a million times. After about a year of regular use, they’ve spun a billion times. And that’s just with the slowpokes. Faster iPod hard drives spin 4,200 times per minute, while computer hard drives can spin as fast as 7,200, TIP4 10,000, or 15,000 times per minute. It’s no picnic when a hard drive conks out on you. Make How do you know if your iPod’s hard drive is shot? If your iPod shows the sad the best of a bad situation by replacing that lower-capacity iPod face, there’s a good chance that a bad hard drive is the cause. You should hard drive with a higher-capacity one. This way, you get a scan the hard drive to make sure.5 little something for your trouble. Occasionally, when you’re loading music to your iPod, it slows down or stops loading altogether. This might also indicate that your hard drive is bad, but scan the hard drive before you arrive at that conclusion.66 A less subjective way to tell if your hard drive is shot is to put your iPod up NOTE to your ear and listen to it. A bad hard drive often makes a lot of noise, from As you might imagine, spinning the hard disk puts a a rapid clicking to a kind of grinding. Sometimes this noise is really loud. If strain on the battery. To extend the life of the charge, your you’ve ever heard it, you know exactly what it sounds like. Marc will never7 iPod stores, or caches, some of the music data from the forget that sound for as long as he lives, because it was the sound of his data hard disk to its memory while the music is playing, which cuts down on the number of times that the platters have going bye-bye. You know, the data that he didn’t adequately back up. to spin. This trick also helps to increase performance. Scan Your Hard Drive8 Scanning your hard drive is, by far, the best way to tell if your iPod is experiencing hard drive issues. The scan should always be step one when you suspect that the hard drive is bad. Don’t go out and buy a replacement910 80 80 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 97. 1 drive until you’ve completed the scan. It does you no good to pop in a new TIP 2 hard drive when the old one wasn’t the problem; imagine your surprise whenAlways plug your iPod into a charger while scanning. the iPod has the same stupid issue after you go to the trouble of replacing theScanning depletes your battery in no time flat. We hard drive.mentioned before that hard disk operations put atremendous strain on your power reserves, and a To scan your hard drive: 3hard disk scan is one of the most power-hungry 1. Put the iPod into diagnostic mode. See Chapter 2 for complete instructions.operations there is. 2. Use the Forward and Reverse buttons to navigate the menu choices until you get to HDD Scan. 3. Press the Select button to start the scan. 4 Make yourself comfortable, because this could take a while. A hard drive scan sets you back 15 minutes to an hour for most models. Occasionally, it takes longer. 5 When the scan finishes, your iPod returns HDD Scan Pass or HDD Scan Fail. Failure indicates a bad hard drive, so go ahead and replace her. If the hard drive passes, you need to look elsewhere for the source of your problems. Your iPod’s logic board is the primary suspect now; see Chapter 9 for how to proceed. 6 6 Check for Drive Compatibility Of all the many hard drives on the market today, only a few models are iPod- 7 compatible, while those that work in certain kind of iPods don’t work in others. You can divide iPod-compatible hard drives into two categories: OEM and non-OEM drives. OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer. An OEM hard drive, then, is one of the actual hard drives that Apple buys wholesale 8 and installs in the iPod at the factory. If you’re going to replace your iPod’s hard drive, you might as well use the same components that Apple does, maximizing compatibility and minimizing your headache. (As you’ll see momentarily, though, there are reasons why you might consider going the 9 non-OEM route.) 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 81 81
  • 98. 1 Table 6-1 lists the OEM hard drives. As you review your options, keep in mind2 that you don’t have to put in the exact same hard drive that you take out. Any OEM hard drive is as good as any other, just as long as it’s compatible with your generation of iPod. Non-OEM hard drives don’t come with any factory-made iPod, but they’re3 compatible with the iPod nevertheless. What makes non-OEM hard drives CAPACITY AND TYPE BRAND MODEL NUMBER COMPATIBILITY 4-gigabyte (GB) Microdrive Hitachi HMS360404D5CF00 First- and second-generation iPod mini4 Seagate ST640211CF 6-GB Microdrive Hitachi HMS360606D5CF00 Released for the second-generation iPod mini, but also Seagate ST660211CF works in the first-generation iPod mini 5-GB hard drive Toshiba MK5002MAL First- and second-generation iPods5 10-GB hard drive Toshiba MK1003GAL First-, second-, and third-generation iPods 15-GB hard drive Toshiba MK1504GAL Released for the third-generation iPods, but also works in the fourth-generation monochrome iPod 20-GB hard drive Toshiba MK2003GAH Second-generation iPod66 Toshiba MK2004GAL Third- and fourth-generation monochrome iPods, iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) Toshiba MK2006GAL Fourth-generation monochrome iPod, iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) 30-GB hard drive Toshiba MK3006GAL Released for the iPod photo (fourth-generation7 color iPod), but also works in the fourth-generation monochrome iPod Toshiba MK3008GAL iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) 40-GB hard drive Toshiba MK4004GAH Third- and fourth-generation monochrome iPods, iPod8 photo (fourth-generation color iPod) Toshiba MK4006GAH Fourth-generation monochrome iPod, iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) 60-GB hard drive Toshiba MK6006GAH Released for the iPod photo, but also works with the fourth-generation monochrome iPod9 Toshiba MK6008GAH iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) 80-GB hard drive Toshiba MK8010GAH iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) Table 6-1: OEM Hard Drives for the iPod and iPod Mini10 82 82 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 99. 1 desirable is their greater storage capacity. For instance, you can get 8 GB of QUICKFACTS 2 storage in an iPod mini by using a non-OEM hard drive, while you can bumpGET A NEW HARD DRIVE up your fifth-generation iPod to 100 GB. (The highest from-the-factory ratingsHard drives aren’t always easy to buy off the shelf at the are 6 GB and 80 GB, respectively.) Some non-OEM hard drives are technicallylocal mall, but doing an Internet search for the specific iPod-compatible, but they require hacks before they’re usable.model number of the drive that you want turns up all 3kinds of buying opportunities. Table 6-2 lists two recommended non-OEM hard drives, neither of whichA replacement hard drive for your iPod costs around requires special hacks to install.$100 to $200 U.S., depending on the model and thevendor. You might run across some juicy deals on eBay, CAPACITY AND TYPE BRAND MODEL NUMBER COMPATIBILITY 4so keep your eyes open. 8-GB Microdrive Seagate ST68022C-RK First- and second-generationOur technical editor points out that if you go the eBay iPod miniroute, you don’t necessarily have to buy new. You could 100-GB hard drive Toshiba MK1011GAH iPod video (fifth-generation iPod)conceivably acquire a second-hand hard drive at a 5fraction of the cost of a brand-new component. As long Table 6-2: Recommended Non-OEM Hard Drives for the iPod and iPod Minias the hard drive is in good working order (and as longas it’s one of the compatible models for your iPod), youcan use it for your replacement drive. Of course, you get Replace Your iPod’s Hard Driveinto stickier issues of quality assurance and customer Table 6-3 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the hard 6 6satisfaction whenever you deal in the second-hand drive in an iPod. We discuss the iPod mini later in this chapter.market, especially where high-tech components areconcerned. Buyer beware most definitely applies. DIFFICULTYAs you consider your options, your high school iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED LEVELeconomics class will serve you well. There’s a point at First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or Moderate 7which the cost of your replacement drive plus the time flat-headed screwdriveryou spend installing it are together more expensive than Second-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or Moderatethe cost of a brand-new iPod. Keep in mind also that the flat-headed screwdriverdata from your old drive must be transferred to the new Third-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or Moderate 8one, so even by replacing the drive, you’re getting what flat-headed screwdriveramounts to a brand-new iPod. Perhaps the only way you Fourth-generation iPod (monochrome) iPod-opening tools or Moderatetruly come out on top is if you put in a higher-capacity flat-headed screwdriverdrive than you take out. But if the time spent isn’t worth it, iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) iPod-opening tools or Moderatethen just buy a new iPod. That’s what Steve Jobs would flat-headed screwdriver 9want of you anyway. iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) iPod-opening tools or Moderate flat-headed screwdriver Table 6-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Hard Drive in an iPod 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 83 83
  • 100. 1 Replace the Hard Drive in2 a First- or Second-Generation iPod To replace the hard drive in a first- or second-generation iPod: 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Unplug and remove the battery from the iPod.3 3. Slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector (see Figure 6-1). Just use your fingers. 4. Remove the hard drive from the iPod, and remove the pieces of rubber that protect the hard drive (see Figure 6-2).45 Figure 6-1: Disconnect the hard drive.667 Figure 6-2: Remove the hard drive.8 5. Put the pieces of rubber on the new hard drive. 6. Slide the new hard drive into the connector (see Figure 6-3). 7. Put the iPod back together.9 Figure 6-3: Connect the new hard drive.10 84 84 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 101. 1 Replace the Hard Drive in 2 a Third-Generation iPod To replace the hard drive in a third-generation iPod: 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Disconnect the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 6-4). 3 3. Locate the hard drive. 4. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector. 5. Remove the hard drive from the iPod, and remove the pieces of rubber that protect the 4 hard drive. 6. Put the pieces of rubber on the new hard drive. Figure 6-4: Disconnect the audio jack. 7. Plug the new hard drive into the hard drive connector. 8. Plug in the audio jack. 5 9. Put the iPod back together. NOTEThe rear casing of the 30-GB iPod video is slightly Replace the Hard Drive in a Fourth-Generationdifferent from that of the 60-GB and 80-GB versions, iPod or an iPod Photo 6 6because the 30-GB hard drive is physically smaller than To replace the hard drive in a fourth-generation monochrome iPod orthe other drives. If you’re upgrading your iPod video’s an iPod photo:30-GB hard drive to something with more storage space(including the 100-GB non-OEM option), you need to 1. Open your iPod according toreplace the rear casing, too, to accommodate the larger the instructions in Chapter 3. 7drive. If you already have a 60-GB or 80-GB iPod video, 2. Disconnect the audioyou already have the right casing, unless, of course, jack from the logic boardyou’re downgrading your iPod to 30-GB for some strange (see Figure 6-5).reason known only to you. Occasionally, Brandon offers 8iPod casings for sale on www.Synctogo.com, but youmight also try a general Internet search. Many iPod repairservices keep them in stock. 9 Figure 6-5: Disconnect the audio jack. Connector Plug 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 85 85
  • 102. 1 3. Locate the hard drive.2 4. Slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector. 5. Remove the hard drive from the iPod, and remove the pieces of blue rubber that protect the hard drive. 6. Put the pieces of rubber on the new hard drive.3 7. Slide the new hard drive into the hard drive connector. 8. Plug the audio jack back into the logic board (see Figure 6-6). 9. Put the iPod back together.4 Replace the Hard Drive in an iPod Video Figure 6-6: Plug in the audio jack. To replace the hard drive in a fifth-generation iPod or iPod Video: 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Unplug the battery from its connector (see Figure 6-7). To help you loosen the5 connection, you can slide the brown clip.667 Cable Brown clip89 Figure 6-7: Unplug the battery.10 86 86 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 103. 1 2 3 Connector 4 Figure 6-8: Unplug the audio jack. 3. Rotate the hard drive to unplug the audio jack’s ribbon cable from the 5 logic board (see Figure 6-8). 4. Locate the hard drive. 5. Find the small connector that holds the hard drive to the logic board 6 (see Figure 6-9). 6 TIP 6. Pull up the black clip to release the hard drive from its connector.Remember, if you’re putting a larger hard drive ina 30-GB iPod video, you need to use the rear casingfrom the 60-GB or 80-GB model. 7 8 9 Figure 6-9: Find the hard drive connector. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 87 87
  • 104. 1 7. Remove the hard drive from the iPod, and remove the pieces of blue or2 grey rubber that protect the hard drive (see Figure 6-10). 8. Put the pieces of rubber on the new hard drive. 9. Plug in the new hard drive. 10. Plug in the ribbon cable for the audio jack.3 11. Plug in the ribbon cable for the battery (see Figure 6-11). 12. Put the iPod back together.45 Figure 6-10: Release the hard drive from its connector.66 Figure 6-11: Plug in the battery.7 Replace Your iPod Mini’s Hard Drive Table 6-4 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the hard8 drive in an iPod mini. iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL First-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools or Moderate flat-headed screwdriver9 Second-generation iPod mini iPod-opening tools or Moderate flat-headed screwdriver Table 6-4: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Hard Drive in an iPod Mini10 88 88 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 105. 1 To replace the hard drive in a first- or second-generation iPod mini: 2 1. Open your iPod mini according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Locate the mini’s Microdrive on the backside of the logic board. It’s the component with Microdrive printed on it. 3. Unplug the Microdrive from the logic board (see Figure 6-12). 3 4. Plug the new Microdrive into the logic board. TIP 5. Slide the logic board back into the mini’s shell (see Figure 6-13).After you replace your iPod mini’s Microdrive, you needto put the mini into Disk Mode and then restore the mini 4in iTunes. See the “Putting the iPod Mini into Disk Mode”QuickSteps for more information. 5 6 6 7 Figure 6-12: Unplug the Microdrive. 8 9 Figure 6-13: Slide in the logic board. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 89 89
  • 106. 1 6. Reconnect the Click Wheel (see Figure 6-14).2345 Figure 6-14: Reconnect the Click Wheel. 7. Replace the two screws in the top of the mini (see Figure 6-15). Figure 6-15: Replace the screws. 8. Place the metal clip back onto the bottom of the mini (see Figure 6-16).6678 Figure 6-16: Replace the metal clip. Figure 6-17: Replace the plastic pieces. 9. Replace the plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the mini (see Figure 6-17).910 90 90 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes PC Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your and
  • 107. 1 UICKSTEPS Restore Your iPod in iTunes 2PUT THE iPOD MINI When you turn on your iPod for the first time after installing a new hard drive,INTO DISK MODE you will probably see the folder icon, which indicates software issues. What’sAfter you replace the Microdrive in an iPod mini, you happening is that your iPod is looking for its operating system on the new hardneed to put the mini into Disk Mode before you can drive. Unless the operating system came preinstalled, it won’t be there for the 3restore it in iTunes. If you don’t do this, your mini won’t iPod to find.function correctly. Before you can use your iPod, you must copy the operating system software toTo put your iPod mini into Disk Mode: the new hard drive, which means restoring the iPod in iTunes, so connect your 1. Hold down the Menu and Select buttons for about 4 iPod to your computer and follow the on-screen prompts. five to eight seconds to reset your iPod mini. 2. The mini shuts down and starts up again almost You should also copy your backed-up music files to your new hard drive. Once immediately. When the Apple logo appears on the your iPod is restored, iTunes asks you to sync your iPod, just like you did when screen, hold down the Back and Select buttons you bought it brand-new. During this process, your tunes are loaded to their 5 until you see the backwards Apple logo and hear new home. As soon as syncing completes, you’re good to go. an audible chirp. 3. The mini prompts you to press the Play button to continue. Press Play. You now have access to the 6 diagnostic menu. 6 4. Browse the menu for the Diskmode option. Highlight it, and press the Select button to select it.You can now restore your iPod mini in iTunes. 7 8 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Storing Tunes and Such: Sorting Out Your Hard Drive PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 91 91
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  • 109. 1How to… Getting a New Audio Jack 2• Replace the Audio Jack in a Third- or Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo 3• Replace the Audio Jack in an iPod Video Balancing Audio Quality and Storage Space Chapter 7 Cranking Up the Volume: 4• Replace Your iPod Mini’s Audio Jack• Solve Your iPod Nano’s Audio Replacing Your Audio Jack Problems 5 When legendary house band M|A|R|R|S enjoins you to pump up the volume, pump up the volume, pump up the volume, dance, dance, we defy you to do anything but. That is, of 6 course, if you can hear them. If you can’t, your iPod’s audio jack might need some attention. In this chapter, we show you how to replace the audio jack so that you can get back to the 7 7 business of cranking it up to 11. Check the Signs 8 of a Bad Audio Jack Good old-fashioned wear and tear is the usual reason for audio jack failure. There’s typically some sort of connection problem. Electrical impulses travel 9 from your iPod to your earbuds by way of the audio jack, which acts more or 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack 93
  • 110. 1 NOTE less like a doorway. The impulses go out through the audio jack into the wire “Pump Up the Volume” by M|A|R|R|S was the record2 that feeds your earbuds, which are nothing more than very small speakers. that never should have been by a band that was never Their function is to convert the impulses to sound. If something breaks down meant to be. M|A|R|R|S began as a collaboration between Colourbox and A R Kane, label-mates on indy 4AD, one anywhere along this connection, the impulses never reach your earbuds or they of the chief outlets for the electronica sound that was arrive in a damaged or incomplete state.3 pulsing through the British underground in the mid-1980s. Despite whatever your mom might have told you, playing your music too loud The goal of M|A|R|R|S was to create artistically minded (but commercially viable) dance music. The bands had doesn’t really have anything to do with it. While loud music can most definitely trouble adapting to each other’s styles, and creative fry your earbuds or speakers—as well as permanently damage your hearing—it differences from the outset kept the project from taking off. doesn’t have an effect on the audio jack itself.4 In the end, with a lot of wrangling from their producer, they managed to cobble together two tracks, one from each What does bad audio sound like? Distorted sound, dropouts, and static top the component group. Colourbox’s contribution was “Pump list. Also, if you have stereo problems—that is, if audio is coming out of one Up the Volume,” to which A R Kane added bits here and earbud and not the other—the audio jack might be to blame. No sound at all is there. It hit the clubs in 1987 in a plain white sleeve. It equally suspect.5 didn’t even ship with an artist attribution. And, of course, it became an instant classic. It shot to the top of the U.K. However, don’t conclude that you need to replace your audio jack until you’ve pop charts, and it’s regarded today as a high-water mark double-checked your earbuds. Bad audio by itself indicates a bad connection, of the ‘80s for its influential use of samples. But the bands but the audio jack isn’t the only place that the connection can go bad. A pinched, responsible were at such cross-purposes that they would6 severed, or blown-out wire inside the earbud cable can cause exactly the same never record as a unit again. sorts of symptoms. So always try to solve your audio problems first by plugging in a different set of earbuds or headphones, or test your earbuds on another device with a headphone jack, such as your computer. NOTE77 Be careful about getting too picky about your iPod’s sound. Depending on your model of iPod, the bass Replace Your iPod’s Audio Jack response might seem weak or muddy, while the iPod Table 7-1 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the audio mini has been known to cause audio distortion even8 when everything is working perfectly. Furthermore, MP3 jack in an iPod. We discuss the iPod mini and the iPod nano in subsequent files don’t have the fidelity of other digital music formats, sections of this chapter. especially when the files are at high compression The bad news first: In first- and second-generation iPods, the audio jack is levels or low sample rates. So if you judge your iPod by soldered to the logic board. Replacing the audio jack by itself is a bit too hard9 audiophile standards, you’re bound to hear limitations; but what you’re hearing could be limitations in the for someone without a lot of iPod repair experience, so we don’t provide technology itself, not necessarily fixable problems. instructions here. However, this doesn’t mean that you’re stuck without a10 94 94 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack iPod Repair Getting Cranking Up the
  • 111. 1 QUICKFACTS iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL GETTING A NEW AUDIO JACK 2 First-generation Not advised Do not attempt; replace You can buy a replacement audio jack online from most iPod the logic board instead any iPod repair service. Do an Internet search or visit Second-generation Not advised Do not attempt; replace Brandon at www.Synctogo.com. You might also have iPod the logic board instead some luck on eBay. Third-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Easy 3 Prices range from about 20 bucks to 60 bucks U.S., iPod screwdriver and small Phillips-head depending on which iPod model you’re repairing. screwdriver Fourth-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Easy iPod (monochrome) screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver 4 iPod photo (fourth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Easy generation color screwdriver and small Phillips-head iPod) screwdriver iPod video (fifth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate 5 generation iPod) screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver Table 7-1: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Audio Jack in an iPod 6 do-it-yourself solution. To clear up your audio issues, you can simply replace the entire logic board, including the audio jack. It might seem strange or counterintuitive, but it’s actually much easier (and safer) to swap logic boards than it is to fiddle around with the audio jack and a soldering iron. 7 7 To replace your iPod’s logic board, see Chapter 9 of this book. Replace the Audio Jack in a Third- or Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo 8 To replace the audio jack in a third- or fourth-generation monochrome iPod or an iPod photo: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 9 2. Disconnect the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 7-1).Figure 7-1: Disconnect the audio jack. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 95 95
  • 112. 1 3. Remove the back from the iPod (see Figure 7-2).234 Figure 7-2: Remove the back.5 4. Locate the audio jack on the back piece (see Figure 7-3).677 Screw8 Figure 7-3: Locate the audio jack. 5. There are three screws attaching the audio jack to the frame of the9 iPod. Take out all three screws with your Phillips-head screwdriver Figure 7-4: Remove the screws. (see Figure 7-4).10 96 96 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack iPod Repair Getting Cranking Up the
  • 113. 1 6. Remove the audio jack (see Figure 7-5). You might have to pull gently, as a small bit of 2 adhesive holds the audio jack in place. 7. Put in the new audio jack. 8. Replace all three screws. 9. Plug the audio jack back into the logic board. 3 10. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Audio Jack in an iPod Video To replace the audio jack in a fifth-generation iPod: 4Figure 7-5: Remove the audio jack. 1. Open your iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. A ribbon cable connects the battery to the logic board. Unplug it (see Figure 7-6). Pull up gently on the brown clip, and the cable should easily come loose. 3. Rotate the hard drive out of the iPod (see Figure 7-7). 5 Brown clip 6 7 7 Figure 7-6: Unplug the battery. 8 Figure 7-7: Rotate the hard drive. 4. Locate the audio jack’s ribbon cable. Pull up gently on the brown clip to release this cable, and then unplug it (see Figure 7-8). 9 Figure 7-8: Unplug the audio jack. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 97 97
  • 114. 1 5. Locate the battery on the back of the iPod, and remove it (see Figure 7-9). A little bit of2 adhesive holds it in place.34 Figure 7-9: Remove the battery.5 6. There are four screws holding the audio jack in place. Remove all four screws with your Phillips-head screwdriver. 7. Find the little piece of black tape that holds down part of the ribbon cable. Remove this tape (see Figure 7-10).6 Screw77 Tape8 Figure 7-10: Remove the screws and the tape.9 8. Place the new audio jack in the iPod (see Figure 7-11). 9. Replace all four screws. Figure 7-11: Put in the new audio jack. 10. Reapply the black tape just as you found it.10 98 98 PC QuickSteps QuickSteps to Know Your PC Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack iPod Repair Getting Cranking Up the
  • 115. 1 QUICKFACTS 11. Place the battery back in the iPod.BALANCING AUDIO QUALITY AND 2 12. Reconnect the audio jack’s ribbon cable. Make sure the brown clip is clipped down onSTORAGE SPACE the cable.Out of convenience or habit, you might call your iPod an 13. Rotate the hard drive back into the iPod.MP3 player, but it can play other kinds of music files, too. 14. Reconnect the battery’s ribbon cable. Again, make sure the brown clip is pressedPerhaps the most common alternate format is AAC, or 3 down.Advanced Audio Coding. In fact, Apple would like youto think of the iPod as an AAC player, not as an MP3 15. Put the iPod back together.player, because AACs are what Apple sells on iTunes.Technically speaking, an AAC file is very similar to an Replace Your iPod Mini’s Audio Jack 4MP3, so much so that it’s not entirely incorrect to think of Table 7-2 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the audioAAC as MP3 version 2.0. Proponents of AAC tout its manyimprovements over the MP3 format, but MP3 has at least jack in an iPod mini.one major advantage: popularity. MP3 is far and awaymore successful than AAC in terms of sheer numbers of iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL 5users, and while MP3 has slipped into the nontechnical First-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderatevernacular, AAC has, as yet, not, no matter how bad Steve iPod mini screwdriver and small Phillips-headJobs might want it to happen. screwdriver Second-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed ModerateAt the beginning of this chapter, we mentioned that iPod mini screwdriver and small Phillips-headMP3s—and by extension AACs—tend to lack in the fidelity 6 screwdriverdepartment, but we didn’t really tell you why. Part of thereason is the level of compression in the typical MP3. Raw Table 7-2: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Audio Jack in an iPod Minidigital audio takes up a lot of storage space. The audio dataneed to be crushed down into smaller, more manageable 7 To replace the audio jack in a first- 7files if you want to be able to carry around thousands ofsongs. That’s where the MP3 format comes in. It makes the or second-generation iPod mini:audio much more compact by putting it through a process 1. Open your iPod mini according to theof compression. The form of compression in an MP3—lossy instructions in Chapter 3.compression, as it’s called—gets rid of some of the excess 8data, which causes an audible drop in quality. Normally, 2. Locate the audio jackmost ears can’t tell much of a difference, but the discerning (see Figure 7-12). It’s on theear can, and the loss in quality becomes obvious to back side of the mini, just aboveeveryone when the rate of compression goes too high. the battery. 9There is such a thing as lossless compression, whichstores audio information more efficiently without getting Continued . . . Figure 7-12: Locate the audio jack. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 99 99
  • 116. 1 QUICKFACTS 3. Carefully unplug the audio jack (see Figure 7-13). Watch out about applying too much BALANCING AUDIO QUALITY AND2 force, because you can damage the logic board. STORAGE SPACE (Continued) rid of any of the excess. Lossless compression gives you the best of both worlds. The data are compressed, so you can fit more songs onto your iPod, but no quality is3 lost, so the audio sounds exactly like the uncompressed original. Your iPod can play Apple Lossless files, which utilize just such a method of compression. The main drawback is that lossless compression doesn’t crush down the audio as much as you might like. Apple4 Lossless files are generally larger than MP3s, although both are much smaller than uncompressed audio files. Another snag with the Apple Lossless format in particular Figure 7-13: Unplug the audio jack. is its lack of portability to computers running Windows. If5 you want to play your tunes on your PC at work as well 4. Plug in the new audio jack (see Figure 7-14). as on your iPod during the commute, the MP3 format makes more sense for purely practical reasons. Your iPod is also capable of storing and playing pristine, uncompressed digital audio. On a Mac, uncompressed6 audio files reside in the AIFF format. On Windows, they’re WAV files. We mention this for the sake of completeness, not as a recommendation. You’re much better off with lossless compression. Lossless music sounds identical77 to AIFF and WAV while taking up considerably less storage. As a side note, you can listen to AIFF files on a computer running Windows, so if quality and multiplatform compatibility are equally important to you, uncompressed Figure 7-14: Plug in the new audio jack. music is always an option.8 Most people don’t rate both factors equally. If your goal is to 5. Slide the logic board and its contents back into the mini’s shell. pack as much music on your iPod as you conceivably can, 6. Put the iPod back together. go with your old standby, the MP3, or try AAC, the iTunes alternative. But if you care less about quantity and more9 about quality (and if you can afford to snub the likes of Bill Gates), see about moving up to Apple Lossless format.10 100 100 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 117. 1 Solve Your iPod Nano’s Audio Problems 2 As you can see from Table 7-3, replacing the iPod nano’s audio jack is not the sort of project that a non-pro should attempt. The reason? The audio jack is soldered to the logic board, and because the nano is that much smaller and more delicate than the iPod, the going is that much trickier. To be successful 3 here, you really need to know what you’re doing. That said, you can solve your iPod nano’s audio problems by installing a new logic board, audio jack and all. We show you how in Chapter 9. 4 iPOD NANO MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL First-generation iPod nano Not advised Do not attempt; replace the logic board instead Second-generation iPod nano Not advised Do not attempt; replace the 5 logic board insteadTable 7-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Audio Jack in an iPod Nano 6 7 7 8 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Cranking Up the Volume: Replacing Your Audio Jack PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Your PC 101 101
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  • 119. 1How to… Polishing Your iPod 2• Replace the Front Panel in a First-Generation iPod• Replace the Front Panel in a 3 Second-Generation iPod• Replace the Front Panel in a Third-Generation iPod Chapter 8• Replace the Front Panel in a Facing the Music: 4 Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo• Replace the Front Panel in an Replacing the iPod Video Front Panel or Shell 5• Replace the Front Panel in a First-Generation iPod Nano• Replace the Shell in a Second- Generation iPod Nano You’re always on the go, and you take your iPod with you. 6 You shove it in your pocket. You toss it into your backpack. It rattles around in your gym bag on the subway. You take it out and pass it around to your friends. You’ve probably dropped 7 it—more than once. Hopefully, you haven’t put it through the washing machine. Before long, that pearly, whiter-shade-of-pale surface that 8 8 so enticed you in the gizmo store begins to look like the face of Frankenstein’s monster. First it gets a little grungy. Then it picks up dings, dints, chips, and scratches, not to mention 9 outright dents. It doesn’t stop working. It plays just fine. It just looks like it’s ready for some reconstructive surgery. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell 103
  • 120. 1 NOTE When this happens, Steve Jobs wants you to think about If you take bets on which song from the Summer of Love2 will be played on the iPod neuron in Standard Earth Year buying a new iPod. He believes that his customers are all 2441, the smart money is on “A Whiter Shade of Pale.” about surface, and his next product generation is glittering in Everyone knows this song. Fewer know the band behind it: Procol Harum, whose succession of stately but soulful the display case. But you don’t have to fall for his Apple-cult mind tricks. Why toss out a perfectly good iPod just because3 albums in the late 1960s and early 1970s surpassed their brilliant breakthrough many times over, although only in artistic terms. “A Whiter Shade of Pale,” Procol’s very first it’s hideous-looking? Simply replace the original front panel or output, recorded in 1967 before they even had a stable shell, and you get that fresh, shiny, new iPod look with none lineup, achieved the kind of commercial and cultural of the hassles of transferring your tunes. We show you how in4 success that few acts in popular music can match. The vocal melody came from singer/pianist Gary Brooker (who this chapter. has a brief role in the movie Evita). The lyrics came from resident poet Keith Reid. The signature organ melody was the work of Matthew Fisher, the band’s featured keyboardist, Get a New Front Panel or Shell5 who wasn’t credited on the original composition, to his long consternation. In December 2006, nearly 40 years after the You’ve decided to give your iPod a facelift. So do you need a new front panel, Summer of Love, Fisher had his day in court and won. The or do you need an entire shell? It all depends on your model of iPod. Table 8-1 royalties from his new co-authorship credit should secure spells it out for you. him a very happy retirement indeed, pending appeal by6 Mssrs. Brooker and Reid. You can buy front panels and shells from most iPod repair services, so check your existing favorite or do an Internet search. Brandon sells these items on iPOD MODEL PART NEEDED QUICKFACTS7 First-generation iPod Front panel POLISHING YOUR iPOD Second-generation iPod Front panel If your iPod isn’t completely banged up, you might Third-generation iPod Front panel consider polishing up your existing case instead of buying Fourth-generation iPod (monochrome) Front panel88 a new one. Polishing gets rid of dirt, restores luster, and iPod photo (fourth-generation color iPod) Front panel even removes certain kinds of scratches. For light to iPod video (fifth-generation iPod) Front panel medium-light wear, it’s certainly something to consider. First-generation iPod mini Shell There are various commercially available polish systems Second-generation iPod mini Shell9 designed specifically for the iPod. Brandon has tried them all, and he comes back with two recommendations: iFresh, First-generation iPod nano Front panel Continued . . . Second-generation iPod nano Shell Table 8-1: Whether to Replace the Front Panel or Shell of an iPod10 104 104 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 121. 1 QUICKFACTS www.Synctogo.com. You might also find a good deal on eBay, but that’s hit or POLISHING YOUR iPOD 2 (Continued) miss. Expect to pay $20 to $60 U.S., depending on the specific part that you need. which he sells at www.Synctogo.com, and Apple Sauce Polish, which you can find at www.applesaucepolish.com. As always, make sure you’re buying the correct front panel or shell. Every single According to Brandon, these two systems work better than generation of iPod has its own unique casing, and you can’t mix and match. any of the others. You’ll pay about 25 bucks for either one. 3 If you decide to try a polish, it’s important to manage your expectations. The polish can work miracles with small or Replace Your iPod’s Front Panel even moderate blemishes, but there are no guarantees, For the flagship iPod in all generations, the front panel is the part that you want and you can forget about larger or deeper scratches. to replace. Table 8-2 shows the required tools and the difficulty level. We talk 4 Decide for yourself what you want to achieve. If getting a pristine-looking iPod is a non-negotiable position for you, about the iPod mini and the iPod nano later in this chapter. you’re better off replacing the front panel or shell. If you just want to tidy up your iPod’s appearance a little, the Replace the Front Panel polish might be the better way to go. in a First-Generation iPod 5 To replace the front panel in a first-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive (see Figure 8-1). There is adhesive 6 holding it down. DIFFICULTY iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED LEVEL First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate 7 screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Second-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Third-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate 8 8 screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Fourth-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate (monochrome) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver iPod photo (fourth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate generation color iPod) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver 9 iPod video (fifth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Hard generation iPod) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriverTable 8-2: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Front Panel in an iPod Figure 8-1: Pull the battery from the hard drive. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 105 105
  • 122. 1 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 8-2).2345 Figure 8-2: Unplug the battery. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector. 5. Pull the hard drive from the iPod (see Figure 8-3).67889 Figure 8-3: Pull out the hard drive. Figure 8-4: Remove the piece of rubber to expose 6. Find the four T6 Torx screws in the logic board. A large piece of rubber covers one of all four T6 Torx screws. them. Take off this piece of rubber to expose the fourth screw (see Figure 8-4).10 106 106 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 123. 1 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all four 2 screws (see Figure 8-5). 8. Remove the logic board from the bottom of the iPod (see Figure 8-6). Now you should be left with the front panel only (see Figure 8-7). 3 4 Screw 5Figure 8-5: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 6 Figure 8-6: Remove the logic board. 7 9. Place the logic board in your new front panel. 10. Replace all four T6 Torx screws in the logic board. 11. Slide the hard drive back into the hard drive 8 8 connector. 12. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 13. Put the iPod back together. 9 Figure 8-7: Only the front panel remains. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 107 107
  • 124. 1 Replace the Front Panel2 in a Second-Generation iPod To replace the front panel in a second-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive. There is adhesive holding it down.3 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector (see Figure 8-8.)4567 Figure 8-8: Slide the hard drive from the connector. 5. Notice the two small brown clips next to the hard drive connector. Pull down on them to loosen the connector, and remove it from the88 logic board (see Figure 8-9).9 Figure 8-9: Remove the hard drive connector.10 108 108 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 125. 1 6. Pull the piece of blue rubber from the iPod (see Figure 8-10). 2 3 4 5 Figure 8-10: Pull out the piece of rubber. 7. Loosen the scroll wheel’s connector by pulling down on the brown tabs (see Figure 8-11). 8. Remove all eight T6 Torx screws from the logic board (see Figure 8-12). 6 Screw 7 8 8 9Figure 8-11: Loosen the scroll wheel’s connector. Figure 8-12: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 109 109
  • 126. 1 9. Carefully lift the logic board just enough to release the scroll wheel’s connector2 (see Figure 8-13).34 Figure 8-13: Release the scroll wheel’s connector.5 10. Remove the logic board (see Figure 8-14). Now only the front panel of the iPod remains (see Figure 8-15).6788 Figure 8-14: Remove the logic board. Figure 8-15: Only the front panel remains. 11. Place the logic board in the new front panel (see Figure 8-16).9 12. Replace all eight T6 Torx screws.10 110 110 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 127. 1 13. Plug in the scroll wheel’s ribbon cable. 2 14. Reattach the hard drive connector, and place the piece of blue rubber where you found it. 15. Slide the hard drive into place. 16. Plug the battery into the logic board, and place the battery on top of the hard drive. 3 17. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Front Panel in a Third-Generation iPod 4 To replace the front panel in a third-generation iPod:Figure 8-16: Put the logic board into the new 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3.front panel. 5 6 7 8 8 Figure 8-17: Unplug the audio jack. 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 8-17). 9 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector, and remove the hard drive from theFigure 8-18: Remove the hard drive. iPod (see Figure 8-18). 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 111 111
  • 128. 1 Plug Connector234 Figure 8-21: Remove the battery. Figure 8-20: Unplug the battery. Figure 8-19: Remove the hard drive connector. Connector5 4. Unplug the hard drive connector from the logic board, and remove it from6 the iPod (see Figure 8-19). 5. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Screw Screw Figure 8-20). 6. Remove the battery from7 the iPod (see Figure 8-21). 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all six screws from the logic88 board (see Figure 8-22). 8. Remove the logic board from the front of the iPod (see Figure 8-23).9 A connector holds the logic board in place. Just unplug Figure 8-23: Remove the logic board. the connector. Figure 8-22: Remove the T6 Torx screws.10 112 112 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 129. 1 9. Notice the back of the screen. Unplug the screen from the connector on the front of the 2 iPod (see Figure 8-24). Now only the front panel of the iPod remains. 10. Plug the screen into the new front panel. 11. Plug the logic board into the new front panel. 12. Replace all six T6 Torx screws. 3 13. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 14. Plug the hard drive connector back into the logic board. 15. Slide the hard drive back into the connector. 16. Plug the audio jack back in. 4 17. Snap the iPod back together. Replace the Front Panel in a Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo 5Figure 8-24: Unplug the screen. To replace the front panel in a fourth-generation monochrome iPod or an iPod photo: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 6 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 8-25). 7 8 8 9 Figure 8-25: Unplug the audio jack. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 113 113
  • 130. 1 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive2 connector, and remove the hard drive from the iPod. 4. Unplug the battery from the logic board, and remove the battery (see Figure 8-26). 5. Remove the black tape covering the hard3 drive connector (see Figure 8-27). Keep the tape, because you’ll need it later. 6. Locate the exposed T6 Torx screws. There are six of them in a fourth-4 generation monochrome iPod, and there are five of them in an iPod photo. With Figure 8-27: Remove the tape. your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove them Figure 8-26: Remove the battery. all (see Figure 8-28).56 Screw Screw7889 Figure 8-28: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 7. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the Click Wheel to the logic board (see Figure 8-29). Figure 8-29: Unclip the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable. This is the ribbon cable on the bottom.10 114 114 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 131. 1 8. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the screen to the logic board (see Figure 8-30). 2 This is the ribbon cable on the top. 3 Connector 4 Figure 8-30: Unclip the screen’s ribbon cable. 5 9. Remove the logic board from the iPod (see Figure 8-31). 10. Pull the screen from the iPod (see Figure 8-32). Only the logic board and the ClickFigure 8-31: Remove the logic board. Wheel remain. 6 7 8 8 Figure 8-32: Remove the screen. 9 11. Put the screen into the new front panel. 12. Put the logic board into the new front panel. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 115 115
  • 132. 1 13. Reconnect the screen to the logic board.2 14. Reconnect the Click Wheel to the logic board. Brown clip 15. Replace all the T6 Torx screws. 16. Plug the battery back into the logic board. 17. Replace the black tape over the hard drive connector.3 18. Plug the audio jack back in. 19. Put the iPod back together. Replace the Front Panel in an iPod Video4 To replace the front panel in a fifth-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. At the bottom of the unit, find and5 disconnect the ribbon cable from the battery (see Figure 8-33). There is a brown clip that you can pull up to make the cable easier to remove. Be gentle with this clip,6 though, as it can pop off. Also, grip the cable near the connector, not where you see the fingers in Figure 8-33: Remove the battery cable. the figure.7 3. Find and disconnect the ribbon cable from the audio jack (see Figure 8-34). This connector also Figure 8-34: Remove the audio jack cable. has a brown clip that works like the one in step 2.88 4. Carefully lift the hard drive, disconnect it using the black clip (which works just like the brown clips from the previous steps), and remove it (see Figure 8-35). 5. Notice the six Phillips-head screws—three on each side—that hold the front panel of the iPod to the frame. Remove all six screws (see Figure 8-36).9 6. Separate the front panel of the iPod from the screen and the logic board (see Figures 8-37 Figure 8-35: Remove the hard drive. and 8-38).10 116 116 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 133. 1 Screw 2 3Figure 8-36: Remove the screws. 4 Figure 8-37: Remove the front panel of the iPod. 7. Put the new front panel onto the frame. 8. Replace the six Phillips-head screws. 5 9. Plug the hard drive back into the hard drive connector. 10. Reattach the audio jack ribbon cable into the connector on the logic board. 11. Rotate the hard drive, and place it in the iPod. 12. Plug the battery’s ribbon cable back into the logic board. 6 13. Put the iPod back together. Replace Your iPod Mini’s Shell 7 For the iPod mini, you need to replace the entire shell, not just the front panel. Figure 8-38: The front panel and the screen and logic board are now separated. See Table 8-3 for the required tools and the difficulty level. iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL 8 8 First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate mini screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver Second-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate 9 iPod mini screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver Table 8-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the iPod Mini’s Shell 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 117 117
  • 134. 1 To replace the shell of a first- or second-generation iPod mini:2 1. Open the iPod mini according to the instructions in Chapter 3. The logic board and shell are now separate (see Figure 8-39).345 Figure 8-39: Separate the logic board and the shell.6 2. Slide the logic board into the new shell (see Figure 8-40).788 Figure 8-40: Put the logic board into the new shell.9 3. Plug the Click Wheel back into the logic board.10 118 118 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 135. 1 4. Put the screws back in the top. 2 5. Replace the metal clip at the bottom of the iPod mini. Replace Your iPod Nano’s 3 Front Panel or Shell The iPod nano is up to its old tricks, as Table 8-4 shows. For first-generation nanos, you replace the front panel, but for second-generation nanos, you replace the entire shell. 4 iPOD NANO DIFFICULTY MODEL TASK TOOLS NEEDED LEVEL Replace the Front Panel in First-generation Replace the front iPod-opening tools or flat- Moderate a First-Generation iPod Nano iPod nano panel only headed screwdriver and small 5 Phillips-head screwdriver To replace the front panel in a first-generation Second- Replace the iPod-opening tools or flat- Hard iPod nano: generation iPod entire shell headed screwdriver and small 1. Open the iPod nano according to the instructions nano Phillips-head screwdriver in Chapter 3. 6Table 8-4: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacingthe Front Panel or Shell of an iPod Nano 2. Three screws hold the logic board down. With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove these screws (see Figure 8-41). 7 Screw 8 8 Figure 8-41: Remove the screws. 9 3. Release the battery from the logic board (see Figure 8-42). Use your iPod-opening tool, because the battery is glued down. Do not completely remove the battery from Figure 8-42: Release the battery. the logic board, because it is soldered in place. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 119 119
  • 136. 1 4. Carefully pull the screen from the Cable2 front panel (see Figure 8-43). The screen is glued down with adhesive. 5. Notice the ribbon cable that connects the front panel of the iPod nano to the logic board.3 Release the clip, and unplug this ribbon cable to free the logic board (see Figure 8-44). Then pull the logic board from the iPod nano. Now the front panel and the logic board4 are separate (see Figure 8-45). Figure 8-43: Pull off the screen. 6. Connect the new front panel to the logic board by attaching the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable (see5 Figure 8-46). Figure 8-44: Remove the ribbon cable.67889 Figure 8-45: Separate the front panel and the Figure 8-46: Connect the new front panel to the logic board. logic board.10 120 120 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to FacingYourMusic: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell QuickSteps Getting Know the PC
  • 137. 1 7. Place the logic board back into the iPod nano. 2 8. Replace the three screws. 9. Put the iPod nano back together. Replace the Shell in a 3 Second-Generation iPod Nano To replace the shell in a second-generation iPod nano: 1. Open the iPod nano according to the instructions in Chapter 3. The logic board and its contents are now separate from the shell (see Figure 8-47). 4 2. Carefully slide the logic board into the new shell (see Figure 8-48). 3. Reattach the audio jack to the logic board. 4. Replace the screw under the audio jack. 5 5. Place the metal bracket back into the bottom of the iPod nano. 6. Slide the audio jack back into place. 7. Replace the screws on the bottom and the top. 8. Put the top and bottom plastic pieces back into place. 6 7Figure 8-47: Separate the shell from theinsides of the iPod nano. 8 8 Figure 8-48: Slide the logic board into the new shell. 9 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Facing the QuickSteps PC Music: Replacing the Front Panel or Shell Getting to Know Your PC 121 121
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  • 139. 1How to… Getting a New Logic Board 2• Replace the Logic Board in a First-Generation iPod• Replace the Logic Board in a 3 Second-Generation iPod•• Replace the Logic Board in a Third-Generation iPod Chapter 9 Replace the Logic Board in a Does Not Compute: 4 Fourth-Generation iPod or an iPod Photo• Replace the Logic Board in an Replacing the Logic Board iPod Video 5• Replace Your iPod Mini’s Logic Board When your iPod was young, did life seem so wonderful? A• Replace the Logic Board in a miracle? Was it beautiful? Magical? That’s because the logic First-Generation iPod Nano board was working perfectly. But logic boards are components 6 like any other, and they go bad from time to time. If yours is making you clinical, cynical, or fanatical because it’s not so logical or dependable (in fact, it’s a vegetable), replacing the 7 logic board is the cure, as we show in this chapter. The cure to Supertramp, however, we have not yet discovered. 8 Check the Signs of a Bad Logic Board The logic board is the brain of your iPod. No joke—your iPod is a miniature computer. The logic board contains the microprocessor as well as the connections 9 9 to the various other components and systems: the battery, the hard drive or flash memory, the display, the audio, the data ports, and so on. If something goes wrong with your logic board, it’s not unlike massive head trauma in a human. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board 123
  • 140. 1 A bad logic board reveals itself in different ways. Your iPod might not turn on, NOTE2 even when you plug it into a charger. If the iPod does turn on, it might show the When one hears “The Logical Song” from Supertramp’s sad face or the folder icon, or it might freeze on the Apple logo. 1979 album Breakfast in America, one wonders if it is some sort of joke. As it turns out, it sort of is. In the It’s hard to diagnose a bad logic board from the symptoms alone, because late 1960s, a Dutch millionaire, wanting to diversify his they’re the same symptoms that you get from other problems. Before you3 portfolio, offered to bankroll struggling keyboardist/singer decide that the logic board is bad, be sure to rule out other possible causes. Rick Davies if he put a band together. Davies didn’t For instance, if the iPod doesn’t turn on, check out the battery, or if you get have to be asked twice. Thus was born Supertramp, the the folder icon, you might want to look into the hard drive or the software. lounge act of the progressive rock era, who borrowed Restoring your iPod in iTunes might do the trick. liberally from the likes of Procol Harum and Yes (not that4 you could tell once Davies and his main conspirator, When you’re reasonably convinced that the other components are in good Roger Hodgson, were finished with them). The first working order, the logic board looks more and more like the culprit. two Supertramp albums generated nothing but debt for Davies’ patron. But the third album, 1974’s Crime of the Replace Your iPod’s Logic Board5 Century, found the trademark mix of Wurlitzer piano, pop melody, and proto-disco that would propel Supertramp to commercial success through the rest of the decade. Table 9-1 shows the required tools and the difficulty level of replacing the logic board in an iPod. We talk about the iPod mini and the iPod nano in subsequent sections of this chapter.6 QUICKFACTS iPOD MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL First-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate GETTING A NEW LOGIC BOARD screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver7 You can buy a replacement logic board for your iPod at Second-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate just about any iPod repair service. Don’t know where to iPod screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver start? Do an Internet search, try eBay, or see Brandon at Third-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate www.Synctogo.com. screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver Unfortunately, the logic board isn’t the cheapest Fourth-generation iPod iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate8 component to replace. Yours will cost you from $50 to (monochrome) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver $150 U.S., depending on your iPod. Once you factor in the iPod photo (fourth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate cost of your labor, it might be cheaper for you just to buy generation color iPod) screwdriver and T6 Torx screwdriver a new iPod. On the other hand, if you do buy a new iPod, iPod video (fifth- iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Hard9 you’ll need to transfer all your music files. Assuming that generation iPod) screwdriver and small Phillips-head9 your hard drive is working fine, replacing the logic board in screwdriver your current iPod saves you from that particular hassle. Table 9-1: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Logic Board in an iPod10 124 124 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 141. 1 Replace the Logic Board in 2 a First-Generation iPod To replace the logic board in a first-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive (see Figure 9-1). There is adhesive 3 holding it down. 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 9-2). 4Figure 9-1: Pull the battery from the hard drive. 5 6 7 Figure 9-2: Unplug the battery. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector. 5. Pull the hard drive from the iPod (see Figure 9-3). 8 6. Find the four T6 Torx screws in the logic board. A large piece of rubber covers one of them. Remove this piece of rubber to expose the fourth screw (see Figure 9-4). 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all four screws (see Figure 9-5). 9 9Figure 9-3: Pull out the hard drive. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 125 125
  • 142. 123 Screw Screw4 Figure 9-4: Remove the piece of rubber to Figure 9-5: Remove the T6 Torx screws. expose the fourth T6 Torx screw.5 8. Remove the logic board from the bottom of the iPod (see Figure 9-6). 9. The screen has four white clips: two on each side of the logic board. These clips hold the screen in place. Disconnect them (see Figure 9-7).67899 Figure 9-6: Remove the logic board. Figure 9-7: Unclip the screen.10 126 126 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 143. 1 10. Find the connector for the screen underneath the Click Wheel. Carefully unplug this 2 connector with your iPod-opening tool or small flat-headed screwdriver (see Figure 9-8). 11. Connect the screen to the new logic board. 12. Connect the four white clips, and make sure they’re holding the screen in place. 13. Fasten the four T6 Torx screws to the new logic board. 3 14. Slide the hard drive into the hard drive connector. 15. Plug the battery into the new logic board. 16. Put the iPod back together. 4 Replace the Logic Board in a Second-Generation iPod To replace the logic board in a second-generation iPod:Figure 9-8: Unplug the screen from the logic board. 5 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Pull the battery from the back of the hard drive. There is adhesive holding it down. 3. Unplug the battery from the logic board. 4. Carefully slide the hard drive from the orange hard drive connector. 6 5. Notice the two small brown clips next to the hard drive connector. Pull down on them gently to loosen the connector, and remove it from the logic board (see Figure 9-9). 6. Pull the piece of blue rubber from the iPod. 7. Loosen the scroll wheel’s connector by pulling down on the brown tabs, just like you 7 did with the hard drive connector in step 5 (see Figure 9-10). 8 9 9 Figure 9-10: Loosen the Figure 9-9: Remove the hard drive connector. scroll wheel’s connector. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 127 127
  • 144. 1 8. Remove all eight T6 Torx screws from the logic board (see Figure 9-11).2 9. Carefully lift the logic board just enough to release the scroll wheel’s connector (see Figure 9-12).3 Screw4 Figure 9-11: Remove the T6 Torx screws.5 Figure 9-12: Release the scroll wheel’s connector.6 10. Remove the logic board (see Figure 9-13). 11. Release the white side clips holding the screen to the logic board (see Figure 9-14).7899 Figure 9-13: Remove the logic board. Figure 9-14: Unclip the screen.10 128 128 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 145. 1 12. Carefully unplug the connector holding the screen to the logic board (see Figure 9-15). 2 13. Connect the screen to the new logic board. 14. Place the new logic board in the iPod, and screw in all eight T6 Torx screws. 15. Plug in the scroll wheel’s ribbon cable. 16. Reattach the hard drive connector, and place the piece of blue rubber where you found it. 3 17. Slide the hard drive into place. 18. Plug the battery into the new logic board, and place the battery on top of the hard drive. 19. Put the iPod back together. 4 Replace the Logic Board in a Third-Generation iPod To replace the logic board in a third-generation iPod: 5Figure 9-15: Unplug the screen from the logic board. 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board. 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector, and remove the hard drive from the iPod (see Figure 9-16). 6 4. Unplug the hard drive connector from the logic board, and remove it from the iPod (see Figure 9-17). 7 Plug 8 9 9 ConnectorFigure 9-16: Remove the hard drive. Figure 9-17: Remove the hard drive connector. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 129 129
  • 146. 1234 Figure 9-18: Unplug the battery.5 5. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 9-18). 6. Remove the battery from the iPod (see Figure 9-19).6 Screw Screw78 Figure 9-19: Remove the battery.99 7. With your T6 Torx screwdriver, remove all six screws from the logic board (see Figure 9-20). Figure 9-20: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 8. Remove the logic board from the front of the iPod (see Figure 9-21). A connector holds the logic board in place. Just unplug it.10 130 130 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 147. 1 Connector 9. Plug the new logic board into the iPod. 2 10. Fasten the six T6 Torx screws to the new logic board. 11. Plug the battery into the new logic board. 12. Plug the hard drive connector into the new logic board. 13. Slide the hard drive back into the connector. 3 14. Plug the audio jack into the new logic board. 15. Snap the iPod back together. Replace the Logic Board in a Fourth- 4 Generation iPod or an iPod Photo To replace the logic board in a fourth-generation monochrome iPod or an iPod photo: 5 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board. 3. Slide the hard drive from the hard drive connector, and remove the hard drive from the iPod. 6 4. Unplug the battery from the logic board, and remove the battery (see Figure 9-22).Figure 9-21: Remove the logic board. 7 8 9 9 Figure 9-22: Remove the battery. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 131 131
  • 148. 123 Screw Screw4 Figure 9-23: Remove the tape.5 5. Remove the black tape covering the hard drive connector (see Figure 9-23). Keep the tape, however, because you’ll need it later. 6. Notice the exposed T6 Torx screws. There are six of them in a fourth-generation mono-6 chrome iPod, and there are five of them in an iPod photo. With your T6 Torx screw- driver, remove them all (see Figure 9-24). Figure 9-24: Remove the T6 Torx screws. 7. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the Click Wheel to the logic board (see Figure 9-25). This is the ribbon cable on the bottom.7899 Figure 9-25: Unclip the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable.10 132 132 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 149. 1 8. Unclip the ribbon cable connecting the screen to the logic board (see Figure 9-26). 2 This is the ribbon cable on the top. 9. Remove the logic board from the iPod (see Figure 5-27). 3 Connector 4 Figure 9-26: Unclip the screen’s ribbon cable. 5 Brown clip Figure 9-27: Remove the logic board. 10. Put the new logic board in the iPod. 6 11. Connect the screen to the new logic board. 12. Connect the Click Wheel to the new logic board. 13. Fasten all the T6 Torx screws to the new logic board. 7 14. Plug the battery into the new logic board. 15. Replace the black tape over the hard drive connector. 16. Plug the audio jack into the new logic board. 17. Put the iPod back together. 8 Replace the Logic Board in an iPod Video To replace the logic board in a fifth-generation iPod: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 9 9 2. At the bottom of the unit, find and disconnect the ribbon cable from the battery (see Figure 9-28). There is a brown clip that you can pull up to make the cable easier toFigure 9-28: Remove the battery cable. remove. Be gentle with this clip, because it can pop off. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 133 133
  • 150. 1 3. Find and disconnect the ribbon cable from the audio jack (see Figure 9-29). This con-2 nector also has a brown clip that works like the one in step 2. 4. Carefully lift the hard drive and rotate it out of the iPod casing, disconnect it using the black clip (which works just like the brown clips from the previous steps), and remove it (see Figure 9-30).34 Figure 9-29: Remove the audio jack cable.56 Figure 9-30: Remove the hard drive. 5. Once the hard drive is removed, unclip the screen from the logic board (see Figure 9-31). Use the brown clip as needed. 6. Notice the six Phillips-head screws—three on each side—that hold the front panel of7 the iPod to the frame. Remove all six screws (see Figure 9-32). Screw899 Figure 9-31: Unclip the screen. Figure 9-32: Remove the screws.10 134 134 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 151. 1 2 3 4 Figure 9-33: Remove the front panel of the iPod. 5 7. Separate the front panel of the iPod from the screen and the logic board (see Figure 9-33). 8. Pull the screen out of the logic board (see Figure 9-34). 6 7 8 Figure 9-34: Remove the screen. 9 9 9. Push the logic board out of the metal frame. There is a little piece of the ribbon cable from the Click Wheel stuck to the metal frame; you need to pull this up. Note also thatFigure 9-35: Remove the logic board from the frame. the logic board is held down with adhesive (see Figure 9-35). 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 135 135
  • 152. 1 10. Unplug the Click Wheel from the logic board (see Figure 9-36).2 11. Connect the Click Wheel to the new logic board. 12. Place the new logic board in the frame. 13. Connect the screen to the new logic board. 14. Put the front panel of the iPod back onto the frame.3 15. Replace the six Phillips-head screws. 16. Clip the screen’s ribbon cable connector down. 17. Plug the hard drive back into the hard drive connector. 18. Attach the audio jack ribbon cable into the connector on the new logic board.4 19. Rotate the hard drive, and place it in the iPod. 20. Plug the battery’s ribbon cable into the new logic board. 21. Put the iPod back together.5 Figure 9-36: Remove the Click Wheel from the logic board. Replace Your iPod Mini’s Logic Board Table 9-2 shows the tools needed and the difficulty level of replacing the logic board in an iPod mini.6 To replace the logic board of a first- or second-generation iPod mini: 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3. 2. Four clips—two per side—attach the screen to the iPod mini. Unclip them to release7 the screen (see Figure 9-37). iPOD MINI MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL8 First-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate iPod mini screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver Second-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate iPod mini screwdriver and small Phillips-head99 screwdriver Figure 9-37: Unclip the screen. Table 9-2: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Logic Board in an iPod Mini10 136 136 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 153. 1 Cable Connector 3. The screen is connected to the logic board by a ribbon cable, which is slid into a 2 small, brown clip. Release the brown clip, and the ribbon cable slides out easily (see Figure 9-38). 4. Unplug the battery from the logic board (see Figure 9-39). 5. Unplug the hard drive from the logic board (see Figure 9-40). 3 4 5Figure 9-38: Disconnect the screen’s ribbon cable. Figure 9-39: Unplug the battery. 6 7 8 9 9 Figure 9-40: Unplug the hard drive. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 137 137
  • 154. 1 6. Unplug the audio jack from the logic board (see Figure 9-41).2 7. Plug the screen into the new logic board. 8. Plug the audio jack into the new logic board. 9. Plug the battery into the new logic board. 10. Plug the hard drive into the new logic board.3 11. Slide the new logic board into the shell. 12. Plug the Click Wheel into the new logic board. 13. Put the screws back in the top. 14. Replace the metal clip at the bottom of the iPod mini.4 15. Replace the plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the iPod mini. Figure 9-41: Unplug the audio jack. Replace the Logic Board in a First-Generation iPod Nano5 As you can see from Table 9-3, replacing the logic board in a first-generation iPod nano is just challenging enough to be interesting, but the second-generation nano is another story entirely. Unless you have a lot of experience fixing nanos, you6 shouldn’t attempt to replace the logic board on your own. Find yourself an iPod repair service instead. iPOD NANO MODEL TOOLS NEEDED DIFFICULTY LEVEL7 First-generation iPod-opening tools or flat-headed Moderate iPod nano screwdriver and small Phillips-head screwdriver Second-generation Not advised Do not attempt iPod nano8 Table 9-3: Tools Needed and Difficulty Level for Replacing the Logic Board in an iPod Nano To replace the logic board in a first-generation iPod nano:9 1. Open the iPod according to the instructions in Chapter 3.9 2. Three screws hold down the logic board. With your Phillips-head screwdriver, remove these screws (see Figure 9-42).10 138 138 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 155. 1 2 3 Screw 4 Figure 9-42: Remove the screws. 5 3. Release the battery from the logic board (see Figure 9-43). Use your iPod-opening tool, because the battery is glued down. Do not completely remove the battery from the logic board, because it is soldered in place. 4. Carefully pull the screen from the front panel (see Figure 9-44). The screen is glued 6 down with adhesive. 7 8Figure 9-43: Release the battery. 9 9 Figure 9-44: Pull off the screen. 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps DoesQuickSteps PC Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board Getting to Know Your PC 139 139
  • 156. 1 Clip 5. A ribbon cable connects the front panel of the iPod nano to the logic board. Release2 the clip, and unplug this ribbon cable to free the logic board (see Figure 9-45). Then pull the logic board from the iPod nano. 6. Release the side clips that hold the screen to the logic board (see Figure 9-46). There are two on each side. You should be able to use your fingers. 7. Locate the ribbon cable that connects the screen to the logic board, and unclip it3 (see Figure 9-47). Cable Connector45 Figure 9-45: Remove the ribbon cable, and pull out the logic board.67 Figure 9-47: Disconnect the screen from the logic board. 8. Attach the screen to the new logic board, and plug the ribbon cable into its connector.8 9. Plug the Click Wheel’s ribbon cable into the new logic board. 10. Place the new logic board into the iPod nano. 11. Fasten the three screws to the new logic board.99 Figure 9-46: Unclip the screen. 12. Put the iPod nano back together.10 140 140 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to Does Not Compute: Replacing the Logic Board QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 157. 1How to…• Install iPodLinux 2 Record Audio with Factory Earbuds• Get Anapod CopyGear 3• Copy Music Files• with Anapod CopyGear Get iGadget Chapter 10 More Than Just Tunes: 4• Copy Music Files with iGadget• Get Daily Horoscopes with iGadget Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software 5• Get Driving Directions with iGadget• Get Movie Showtimes with iGadget We’ve spent nine whole chapters in this book talking about 6• Get Weather Forecasts hardware fixes. Before we leave you, we thought we’d take with iGadget you on a brief tour of the software side of the iPod equation. Normally, when it comes to iPod software, you look no further 7 than Apple’s own iTunes. Maybe iTunes does everything you want it to do, but then again, maybe it doesn’t. For instance, you might want an easier way to transfer your music files 8 from your iPod to your computer. A couple of independent software companies have come up with solutions to that particular problem, which they provide alongside other iPod 9 enhancements that are sure to be of interest. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software 141
  • 158. 1 We talk about those in the second half of this chapter. We2 start you off with trading up your iPod’s operating system, for those of you who are so inclined.3 Check Out iPodLinux When most people come across a new handheld, hard drive–based consumer electronics device, they think about all the ways they can use it to improve the status or quality of their lives. There is that subset of people, however, for whom4 a new handheld, hard drive–based consumer electronics device isn’t so much a ticket to Coolsville or Easy Street as it is an invitation to port a Linux kernel. The people at the iPodLinux project are just this sort. They’ve managed to get5 a species of Linux—the popular open-source computer operating system— onto first-, second-, and third-generation iPods, with development ongoing for later models. To a non-geek, this might seem like the ultimate so-what moment, but just take6 a minute to consider the possibilities. We’ve mentioned many times before that your iPod already has its own built-in operating system, or firmware, as it’s called, but the iPod’s firmware, as sophisticated as it is, is fairly limited as NOTE far as operating systems go, and your iPod has a lot more going for it than it7 iPodLinux is not the only alternate firmware that you can lets on. Replacing your iPod’s built-in operating system with something more install and use on your iPod. If this sort of thing piques robust—something like Linux, for example, which plays in the same league as your fancy, you might also want to check out Rockbox Windows and Mac OS X—brings out your iPod’s inner computer in ways that (www.rockbox.org). As this book goes to press, Rockbox Steve Jobs never conceived of. You get your tunes—that’s just a given—plus8 installations support the iPod in all generations from the games, calculators, calendars, clocks, maps, text editors, graphics editors, first to the fifth; both generations of the iPod mini; and the first-generation iPod nano; among many other brands of system utilities, and on and on. Suddenly you’re not just packing an MP3 MP3 players. player. You’ve got a surprisingly versatile digital engine of computation right there in the palm of your hand.91010 142 142 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 159. 1So is iPodLinux going to render obsolete your personal digital assistant (PDA) or 2notebook computer? Probably not—at least not today. For serious business, youneed more than just an iPod. Where iPodLinux really shines is in enhancing youriPod’s entertainment value, not to mention your standing in your circle of friends.In a world where everyone else has the same old iPod, you certainly won’t lose 3any peeing matches when you whip out your Linux-enhanced configuration.You’ll like the price, too. It’s free of charge. Linux comes from the planet ofopen-source software, where proprietary is a dirty word and people work forthe fun and glory of it, all for the simple pleasure of others, and iPodLinux is 4offered in the same community spirit.The downside to iPodLinux is that it skews technical sometimes, particularlywhen something goes wrong. If you’ve never used Linux before, you might notknow where to begin to fix whatever problems crop up. The iPodLinux project 5does offer technical support of a sort, although they are not a for-profit venture,so they’re not in the business of being nice to customers who don’t really knowwhat they’re doing. If you go to them with a general complaint, particularlywith the mindset of the jilted consumer, “revenge of the nerds” doesn’t quite 6cover the level of sarcasm that you will experience. Apple is even less helpto you, because iPodLinux is operating way outside the traditional corporatecomfort zone. Basically, if you get in over your head, it’s on you. 7You might wonder what can go wrong if you do switch to iPodLinux. Theanswer: everything, but only temporarily. Your iPod can stop working, andyou might lose your music. However, it’s not like a game of Russian roulette.If you take your time with the installation, you shouldn’t have anything to 8worry about. And you improve your chances of success immensely by installingiPodLinux on older iPods only, no newer than the third generation.Even if absolutely everything goes wrong, a good old-fashioned restore fromiTunes will correct any problems that iPodLinux introduces. In no case does 9iPodLinux harm your iPod’s hardware, so you’ll always be able to go back tothe original factory settings. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 143 143
  • 160. 1 Before you attempt to install iPodLinux on your iPod, you want to read over2 the documentation thoroughly, which you find on the project’s Web site at www.ipodlinux.org (see Figure 10-1). There is a good deal of it, so make yourself comfortable, and if you begin to experience that queasy feeling that you always used to get in algebra class, you might be better off giving iPodLinux a skip.345678 Figure 10-1: Check out iPodLinux on the Web.91010 144 144 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 161. 1Install iPodLinux 2 As we mentioned, the first step in getting iPodLinux is to point your Web browser to www.ipodlinux.org and read over the documentation. When you’re ready to continue, look for a link to the official installer. The installer is a software application that you download and run from your computer. There 3 are three different versions: one for Windows XP, one for Mac OS X, and one for Linux. Choose the one that corresponds to your computer’s operating system. So if you’re on a computer running Windows XP, you want the Windows XP installer, even though your iPod is made by Apple. 4 After you’ve downloaded the installer application: 1. Double-click the installer’s icon on your computer. The installer launches, as this illustration shows. 5 6 7 8 2. Connect your iPod to your computer. 3. Your iPod should enter Disk Mode automatically. (You know it’s in Disk Mode when you 9 see the Do Not Disconnect message.) If your iPod doesn’t enter Disk Mode, you can always force it. See Chapter 2 for how to put your iPod into Disk Mode manually. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 145 145
  • 162. 1 4. Select your iPod from the drop-down menu in the installer window, as this2 illustration shows.345 5. Select the option to make Linux your default operating system if you want your iPod to boot up in iPodLinux instead of in the built-in Apple firmware, as the following6 illustration shows. If you don’t select this option, you must choose which firmware to use whenever you turn on or reset your iPod. TIP If you choose to boot your iPod in iPodLinux automatically,7 you can switch back to the original Apple firmware by resetting the iPod and then holding down the Rewind button as the iPod boots up.891010 146 146 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 163. 1 6. Click the Install button. Wait until the installation completely finishes before continuing. UICKSTEPS 2 7. Disconnect your iPod from your computer.RECORD AUDIO WITH FACTORY 8. Reset your iPod by holding down the Menu and Play buttons for about five toEARBUDS eight seconds.In iPodLinux, you can use the earbuds that came with Congratulations! You’re in iPodLinux. The graphical user interface, or GUI, ofyour iPod to record audio directly to your iPod’s hard 3drive, just like a tape recorder. your new firmware is called podzilla after the Web browser Mozilla.That might read like a misprint, but it isn’t. Your earbuds Feel free to explore. Your first stop might be some games. Try Steroids, yourare just very small speakers, as we’ve already pointed iPod Asteroids clone, or BlueCube, your iPod Tetris clone, among many others.out. What you might not know, and which always blows 4minds when it’s first learned, is that speakers andmicrophones are actually the same device. With thespeaker, the sound comes out. With a microphone, the Check Out Anapod CopyGearsound goes in. But the science behind them is exactly Anapod CopyGear is a standalone software application that enables you tothe same. That means that any speaker can double as transfer your music, photos, and videos from your iPod to your computer—a 5a microphone, just like any microphone can double as great way to make backups of all that valuable data (Marc, take note). Think ofa speaker. Your iPodLinux installation takes advantage it as sort of an iTunes alternative. It’s software for your computer, not firmwareof that fact to give you audio-recording capabilitiesright through your factory earbuds. You never need be for your iPod, so you don’t have to worry about your iPod’s configuration. Plus, CopyGear works equally well with all iPod models. 6misquoted again. 1. Connect your earbuds to the audio jack. You download CopyGear directly to your computer. Unlike iPodLinux, it’s 2. In podzilla, choose the Extras menu. commercially licensed software, which means that you have to pay for your 3. From the Extras menu, choose Recordings. copy. How much you pay depends upon the version that you want. If you’re 7 4. From the Recordings menu, choose Mic Record. using Mac OS X, you have only one choice: the Mac OS X version, which 5. Press Select on your iPod to start recording. Use costs you $19.95 U.S. and works with every iPod ever made. Windows users the Play/Pause button to pause. have several options, ranging from $19.95 U.S. for the iPod shuffle version to 6. Talk into the left earbud. $29.95 U.S. for the all-iPods-ever-made version. It’s also worth noting that on 8 computers running Windows, Anapod CopyGear comes as part of the Anapod 7. Press Select to stop recording. Explorer bundle, which gives you buffed-up search and management features, 8. Go to the Playback menu in podzilla to listen to your recording. while on a Mac, you get CopyGear only. 9 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 147 147
  • 164. 1 If you want to try before you buy, you can. Red Chair Software, the makers of2 the Anapod line, offer free trial versions for both Mac and Windows systems. Upgrade to a paid version, and you get free lifetime updates—not a bad incentive. Get Anapod CopyGear3 Point your Web browser to www.redchairsoftware.com/anapod (see Figure 10-2), and look for the link to Mac OS X software. Windows users, click the Get Anapod link instead. From this page, you can download the free trial version or supply456789 Figure 10-2: Get Anapod CopyGear (Mac OS X) or Anapod Explorer (Windows) on the Web.1010 148 148 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 165. 1 your payment information and download the commercial version of your choice. 2 To begin installation once the file has transferred, double-click the application’s icon on your computer. Copy Music Files with Anapod CopyGear 3 After you’ve installed Anapod CopyGear (or Anapod Explorer for Windows users), launch the application and connect your iPod to your computer. You see the contents of your iPod in the CopyGear window (see Figure 10-3). 4 5 6 7 8 9Figure 10-3: CopyGear shows the contents of your iPod. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 149 149
  • 166. 1 To transfer music files back to your computer, select the files that you want to NOTE2 copy, and click the Copy Selected Items tab at the top of the interface. A pop-up By default, Anapod CopyGear places your copied files on window alerts you that file transfer is imminent, as the following illustration the desktop. You can specify a different default location shows. Click the Begin Copy button to start copying. under the Preferences tab.3456 Check Out iGadget Another computer-based utility for copying your music files is iGadget from7 iPodSoft. In addition to creating computer backups of your iPod data, this software enables you to transfer all kinds of digital information to your iPod: daily horoscopes, driving directions, movie showtimes, and weather reports, plus Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, podcasts, gas prices, and so on. NOTE8 Like CopyGear, iGadget is direct-to-download software for your computer. You If you’re using Windows and you use Microsoft Outlook pay $15 U.S. for the Mac or Windows version. Unlike CopyGear, there is no free 2002 or later as your e-mail client, you can use iGadget to copy e-mails and contacts from Outlook to your iPod. trial, although you can download a couple of free utilities from iPodSoft’s Web site that mimic some of the features that you find in iGadget.91010 150 150 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 167. 1 The software works on all versions of iPods. However, not all of the features are 2 available on older iPods or the iPod shuffle. Newer iPods—third generation and on, plus the iPod mini and the iPod nano—give you the best results. Get iGadget 3 Go to www.ipodsoft.com, and click the link for iGadget (see Figure 10-4). From this page, you can buy the Windows or Mac version of the software. You pay your money, and you download your iGadget. After the file transfers to your computer, double-click its icon to begin installation. 4 5 6 7 8 9Figure 10-4: Get iGadget on the Web. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 151 151
  • 168. 1 Copy Music Files with iGadget2 When you launch iGadget for the first time, you see a pop-up window. On a Mac, the pop-up window explains how to prevent iTunes from auto-updating your iPod, as the illustration to the left shows. Be sure to read these instructions all the way through, because if iTunes auto-updates your iPod, you could end3 up losing your music. On a Windows PC, the pop-up window asks you to disable iTunes temporarily to prevent iTunes from auto-updating your iPod and possibly deleting your music files. Select the option for this, and click OK to proceed.4 Now connect your iPod to your computer. The software displays a screen like the one in Figure 10-5. To copy music from your iPod to your computer, click the Transfer Songs plug-in5 on the left side of the interface window. In the Mac version of iGadget, it’s right there in the open in the Plug-ins pane. In the Windows version, find the Transfer Songs From iPod plug-in under the iPod Information category. Select the music files to copy by selecting the corresponding check boxes, and6 then click the Transfer Songs button in the toolbar along the top of the screen. A new window pops up, as the following illustration shows.7891010 152 152 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 169. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7Figure 10-5: Welcome to iGadget! Browse to the location on your computer where you’d like to save the copied files, and click the Transfer button. 8 Get Daily Horoscopes with iGadget Avoid streaks of bad luck and karmic recalibrations with your daily guide to cosmic influence, right there in your iPod, courtesy of iGadget. 9 1. Mac users, choose the Daily Horoscopes plug-in from the pane on the left side of the interface window. Windows users, click the Internet Information category on the left side of the interface window, and choose the Daily Horoscopes plug-in. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 153 153
  • 170. 1 2. Choose your sun sign and the dates of interest. NOTE2 3. Click the Sync Plug-in button (Mac) or the Sync Daily Horoscope button (Windows). First- and second-generation iPods store horoscopes and other downloaded data from the Internet in the Contacts You can now review the prophetic utterances of the planets in the Notes section section of your iPod, because there is no Notes section. of your iPod. Can’t find your Notes section? Didn’t know that you had one? Look under Extras in the main menu of your iPod.3 Get Driving Directions with iGadget Metaphysically isn’t the only way for one to be lost. Assuming that your stars are in order, you want to make sure that the physical you is pointed in the right4 direction also. Get there fast on your iPod through iGadget. 1. Mac users, choose the Driving Directions plug-in from the pane on the left side of the interface window. Windows users, click the Internet Information category on the left side of the interface window, and choose the Driving Directions plug-in.5 2. Click the Add button in the toolbar. 3. A pop-up window opens, as the following illustration shows. Enter your current location and your desired destination, and click OK.67891010 154 154 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 171. 1 4. The pop-up window closes, and iGadget displays your driving directions. Select the 2 ones to copy to your iPod. 5. Click the Sync Plug-in button (Mac) or the Sync Driving Directions button (Windows). When you check your iPod’s Notes or Contacts section, your driving directions should be there. 3Get Movie Showtimes with iGadget Missing work, school, deadlines, and meetings is life, but missing movies is unacceptable. Improve your ratio of timely arrival by carrying around 4 showtimes in your iPod. 1. Mac users, choose the Movie Showtimes plug-in from the pane on the left side of the interface window. Windows users, click the Internet Information category on the left side of the interface window, and choose the Movie Showtimes plug-in. 5 2. Click the Add button in the toolbar. 3. A pop-up window opens, as the illustration to the left shows. Enter your current ZIP code, and type a brief description of this location—Home, Work, or Vacation, for example—for ease of reference later. Click OK to proceed. 6 4. The pop-up window closes, and iGadget displays the movie theaters in your area, along with the movies currently playing and the published showtimes. Select the desired results. 5. Click the Sync Plug-in button (Mac) or the Sync Movie Showtimes button (Windows). 7 Look in your iPod’s Notes or Contacts section for the movies and showtimes.Get Weather Forecasts with iGadget 8 Paul Simon gathers all the news he needs from the weather report. You can, too. 1. Mac users, choose the Weather Forecasts plug-in from the pane on the left side of the interface window. Windows users, click the Internet Information category on the left side of the interface window, and choose the Weather Forecasts plug-in. 9 2. Click the Add button in the toolbar. 10 10 iPod Repair QuickSteps More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Your PC PC QuickSteps Getting to Know Software 155 155
  • 172. 1 3. A pop-up window opens, as the following illustration shows. Enter your current ZIP NOTE2 code or location ID, and type a quick description of this location. From the drop-down “The Only Living Boy in New York” from Bridge Over menu, choose the number of days to include in your forecast, and then click the option Troubled Water, Simon and Garfunkel’s 1970 studio for metric or standard English (Imperial) units, depending on your preference. Click OK finale, isn’t the pop standard that the title track has to continue. become, although it’s clearly the finer song. In it, Simon3 urges friend Tom to get on with his life, even if it means that they don’t see each other any more. Tom, of course, is none other than Art Garfunkel, who went by Tom in the early days when the duo performed as Tom and Jerry. No more heartfelt breakup song between two heterosexual4 men has yet been recorded.5 4. The pop-up window closes, and iGadget displays your weather reports. Select the ones to add to your iPod. 5. Click the Sync Plug-in button (Mac) or the Sync Weather Report button (Windows).6 The weather reports appear in your iPod’s Notes or Contacts section.7891010 156 156 PC iPod Repair QuickSteps to More Than Just Tunes: Looking at Third-Party Firmware and Software QuickSteps Getting Know Your PC
  • 173. checking, 44 IndexNumber checking connections in, 57 D5 In 1 option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 Daily Horoscope plug-in, using with iGadget, going bad, 44 153–154 impact of scanning hard drives on, 81 diagnostic menu life of, 24A problems with, 44 accessing, 18–20AAC (Advanced Audio Coding), 99–100 navigating, 18 prolonging lives of, 44Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), 99–100 options, 21 releasing for screen replacement in iPodAnapod CopyGear software Disk Mode, iPod mini in, 91 nanos, 76 copying music files with, 149–150 Diskmode option in diagnostic menu, removing to replace screen, 67–68 features of, 147–148 function, 21 unplugging for screen replacement, 60 getting, 148–149 drives. See hard drives unplugging from logic board, 45Apple firmware, switching to, 146 driving directions, getting with iGadget, 154–155 unplugging to replace screen, 67Apple logo, unfreezing, 26 Drv Temp option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 battery cables, removing to replace screen, 71audio, recording with factory earbuds, 147 battery replacementaudio jack cable, removing to replace screen, 72 in first- and second generation iPods, 45–46audio jacks in first-generation iPod nano, 56–57 E checking, 93–94 earbuds, recording audio with, 147 in fourth-generation iPod, 50–51 removing from iPod nano, 39–40 in iPod mini, 53–56 replacing, 94–95, 99 in iPod photo, 50–51 unplugging from iPod photo, 33 in iPod video, 51–53 F unplugging to replace screen, 66, 68 factory earbuds, recording audio with, 147 in third-generation iPods, 47–50Audio option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 fifth-generation iPods. See also iPodsaudio quality versus storage space, 99–100 identifying, 8–9audio-jack replacement in fourth-generation iPods, 95–97 C opening, 33–34 Figures CF (CompactFlash) slot, relationship to in iPod minis, 99 diagnostic menu on newer iPods, 19–20 Microdrive, 9 in iPod photos, 95–97 diagnostic menu on older iPods, 18–19 chargers, using with batteries, 24 in iPod videos, 97–99 folder icon, 22 Chgr Curr option in diagnostic menu, in third-generation iPods, 95–97 low-battery icon, 24 function, 21 low-battery symbol, 25 Click Wheel, 11, 70 sad face, 21 Click Wheel connector, unplugging fromB iPod mini, 36 Figures for fifth-generation iPods, features, 9backups, making, 22 Figures for first-generation iPod nanos CompactFlash (CF) slot, relationship toBatt A2D option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 battery replacement, 56–57 Microdrive, 9batteries. See also low-battery; power features, 13 compression, 99 charging, 23 front-panel replacement, 119–121 Contrast option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 logic-board replacement, 138–140 iPod Repair QuickSteps Index Windows XP QuickSteps Storing Information 157 157
  • 174. Figures for first-generation iPod nanos (cont.) Figures for iPod videos firmware, 142 opening, 37 audio-jack replacement, 97–99 first-generation iPod nanos screen replacement, 75–78 battery replacement, 51–53 battery replacement in, 56–57Figures for first-generation iPods front-panel replacement, 116–117 front-panel replacement in, 119–121 battery replacement, 45–46 hard-drive replacement, 86–88 opening, 37 features, 3–4 logic-board replacement, 133–136 replacing screens in, 75–78 front-panel replacement, 105–107 opening, 33–34 first-generation iPods, 3–4. See also iPods hard-drive replacement, 84 screen replacement, 71–74 battery replacement in, 45–46 logic-board replacement, 125–127 Figures for second-generation iPod minis, front-panel replacement in, 105–108 opening, 32 features, 12 iPod mini, 10–11 screen replacement, 60–63 Figures for second-generation iPod nanos iPod nano, 13–14Figures for fourth-generation iPod photos features, 14–15 logic-board replacement in, 125–127 front-panel replacement, 113–116 front-panel replacement, 121 opening, 31–32 logic-board replacement, 131–133 opening, 38–41 replacing screens in, 60–63Figures for fourth-generation iPods screen replacement, 78 resetting, 18 audio-jack replacement, 95–97 Figures for second-generation iPods flash memory, 13 battery replacement, 50–51 battery replacement, 45–46 folder icon, 22–23 features, 6 features, 4–5 fourth-generation iPods. See also iPods front-panel replacement, 113–116 front-panel replacement, 108–111 audio-jack replacement, 95–97 hard-drive replacement, 85–86 hard-drive replacement, 84 front-panel replacement in, 113–116 logic-board replacement, 131–133 logic-board replacement, 127–129 hard-drive replacement in, 85–86 opening, 33 opening, 32 identifying, 6–7 screen replacement, 69–71 screen replacement, 63–66 logic-board replacement in, 131–133Figures for iPod minis Figures for third-generation iPods opening, 33 audio-jack replacement, 99–100 audio-jack replacement, 95–97 replacing, 50–51 battery replacement, 53–56 battery replacement, 47–50 replacing screens in, 69–71 features, 10–11 features, 5–6 front panels, replacing, 104 hard-drive replacement, 88–91 front-panel replacement, 111–113 front-panel replacement logic-board replacement, 136–138 hard-drive replacement, 85 in first-generation iPod nanos, 119–121 opening, 35–36 logic-board replacement, 129–131 in first-generation iPods, 105–108 screen replacement, 74–75 opening, 33 in fourth-generation iPods, 113–116 shell replacement, 117–119 screen replacement, 66–69 in iPod photos, 113–116Figures for iPod photos FireWire in iPod videos, 116–117 battery replacement, 50–51 option in diagnostic menu, 21 in second-generation iPods, 108–111 features, 8 port on first-generation iPod, 3–4 in third-generation iPods, 111–113 hard-drive replacement, 85–86 versus USB, 6 screen replacement, 69–71158 iPod Repair QuickSteps Index
  • 175. iPod videosG I audio-jack replacement, 97–99GB (gigabyte) rating, explanation, 3 IEEE 1394, 4 battery replacement in, 51–53Gen 5.5 iPod, 9 iGadget front-panel replacement in, 116–117gigabyte (GB) rating, explanation, 3 copying music files with, 152–153 hard-drive replacement in, 86–88 features of, 150–151 identifying, 8 getting, 151 logic-board replacement in, 133–136H getting daily horoscopes with, 153–154 opening, 33–34hard drive connector, removing for screen getting driving directions with, 154–155 replacing screens in, 71–74 replacement, 63, 67 getting movie showtimes with, 155 iPodLinuxhard drives getting weather forecasts with, 155–156 features of, 142–144 brands of, 82 installer, using with iPodLinux, 145 installing, 145–147 buying, 83 iPod cases, opening, 30–31 iPods capacities of, 82 iPod minis first generation, 3–4 compatibility, 82 audio-jack replacement, 99–100 fourth-generation, 6–7 compatibility of, 81–83 battery replacement in, 53–56 iPod video, 8 model numbers for, 82 in Disk Mode, 91 OEM hard drives for, 82 problems with, 80 first generation, 10–11 opening first-generation models, 31–32 removing from iPod video, 72 front-panel replacement, 117–119 opening second-generation models, 31–32 removing to replace screen, 67 hard-drive replacement in, 88–90 opening third-generation models, 33 removing to replace screens, 61 logic-board replacement in, 136 polishing, 104–105 scanning, 80–81 opening, 35–36 putting back together, 40 types of, 81 replacing screens in, 74–75 repairing, 31–32hard-drive replacement second generation, 11–12 resetting, 18–19 in first-generation iPods, 84 iPod nanos restoring, 26 in fourth-generation iPods, 85–86 battery replacement in, 56–57 restoring in iTunes, 91 in iPod mini, 88–90 identifying, 12–15 second-generation, 4–5 in iPod video, 86–88 opening, 37–41 storage capacity, 3 in second-generation iPods, 84 iPod photos third-generation, 5–6 in third-generation iPods, 85 audio-jack replacement, 95–97 iTunes, restoring iPods in, 91HDD R/W option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 battery replacement in, 50–51HDD Scan Fail, 22 front-panel replacement in, 113–116HDD Scan option in diagnostic menu, function, 21HDD Scan Pass, 22 identifying, 7–8 logic-board replacement in, 131–133 K Key option in diagnostic menu, function, 21Hitachi, hard drives manufactured by, 82 opening, 33horoscopes, getting with iGadget, 153–154 replacing screens in, 69–71Hp Status option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 iPod shuffles, 15 iPod Repair QuickSteps Index Windows XP QuickSteps Storing Information 159 159
  • 176. L O disconnecting for iPod minis, 75 removing from iPod nanos, 76LCD (liquid crystal display), 4, 60 OEM hard drive, explanation of, 81 revealing on iPod video, 34liquid crystal display (LCD), 4, 60 unclipping from screen, 70logic boards checking, 123–124 P disconnecting audio jack from, 40 removing for screen replacement, 62 polish systems, using, 104–105 power, restoring, 57. See also batteries S sad face, 21–22 removing to replace screen, 65, 68, 71 power icon, 26 screen replacement replacing, 124 in first-generation iPod nano, 75–78 sliding through casing, 41 unclipping screens from, 66, 78 Q in first-generation iPods, 60–63 in fourth-generation iPod, 69–71 unplugging batteries from, 45 QuickFacts in iPod mini, 74–75logic-board replacement audio jacks, 95 in iPod photo, 69–71 in first-generation iPods, 125–127 audio quality versus storage space, 99–100 in iPod video, 71–74 in fourth-generation iPods, 131–133 batteries, 45 in second-generation iPod nano, 78 in iPod minis, 136 Gen 5.5, 9 in second-generation iPods, 63–66 in iPod photos, 131–133 hard drives, 83 in third-generation iPods, 66–69 in iPod videos, 133–136 iPod shuffles, 15 screens in second-generation iPods, 127–129 logic boards, 124 disconnecting from logic boards, 77 in third-generation iPods, 129–131 polishing iPods, 104–105 inkblot in, 59lossless compression, 99–100 popular music, 37 from iPod photo, 71lossy compression, 99 repairing iPods, 31–32 removing from fourth-generation iPods, 71low-battery. See also batteries screens, 61 removing from iPod video, 73 icon, 23–25 U2 Special Edition, 8 unclipping, 62, 65 symbol, 25 QuickSteps unclipping from logic boards, 78 warning screen, 24–25 iPod storage capacity, 3 unclipping in iPod nanos, 77 recording audio with factory earbuds, 147 unclipping in iPod video, 72 software version, 26M unplugging from logic boards, 66 screwdrivers (Torx), sizes, 30Microdrive, 9movie showtimes, getting with iGadget, 155 R screws exposing, 61MP3 versus AAC, 99–100 Read SN option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 removing, 62, 64, 68, 70music Remote option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 scroll wheel popularity of, 37 repairing iPods, 31–32 on first-generation iPod, 3–4 transferring Reset option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 inaccessibility in diagnostic menu, 18music files resetting iPods, 18–20, 23 loosening connector for, 64 copying with Anapod CopyGear, 149–150 restoring iPods, 26, 91 releasing connector for, 65 copying with iGadget, 152–153 ribbon cables160 iPod Repair QuickSteps Index
  • 177. Seagate, hard drives manufactured by, 82–83 for logic-board replacement in iPod nanos, 138second-generation iPod nanos T opening iPod cases with, 30–31 T6 Torx screws opening, 38–41 for replacing batteries, 45 exposing, 61 replacing screens in, 78 for screen replacement, 60 removing, 62, 64, 68, 70 shell replacement in, 121 screen replacement in iPod mini, 74–75 tape, removing to replace screen, 68second-generation iPods, 4–5. See also iPods screen replacement in iPod nanos, 75 third-generation iPods. See also iPods battery replacement in, 45–46 Torx screwdrivers, sizes, 30 audio-jack replacement, 95–97 front-panel replacement in, 108–111 Toshiba, hard drives manufactured by, 82–83 battery replacement in, 47–50 hard-drive replacement in, 84 tunes, storage of, 80 front-panel replacement in, 111–113 iPod mini, 11–12 hard-drive replacement in, 85 iPod nano, 14–15 logic-board replacement in, 127–129 identifying, 5–6 logic-board replacement in, 129–131 U opening, 31–32 U2 Special Edition, 8 opening, 33 replacing screens in, 63–66 Universal Serial Bus (USB), 6 replacing screens in, 66–69 resetting, 18 USB (Universal Serial Bus), 6 toolsshell replacement, 104 Use iTunes to restore screen, 26 for audio-jack replacement, 95, 99, 101 in iPod minis, 117–119 for battery replacement in iPod mini, 53 in second-generation iPod nanos, 121Sleep option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 for battery replacement in iPod nano, 56 for front-panel replacement, 105 WSmrt Dat option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 warranty coverage, 22, 30 for front-panel replacement in iPod minis, 117software version, determining, 26 weather forecasts, getting with iGadget, 155–156 for front-panel replacement in iPod nanos, 119spudgers, 30 Web site for tools, 30 for front-panel replacement in iPods, 105Status option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 Wheel option in diagnostic menu, function, 21 for hard-drive replacement, 83storage capacity, determining, 3 for logic-board replacement, 124storage space versus audio quality, 99–100 iPod Repair QuickSteps Index Windows XP QuickSteps Storing Information 161 161
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  • 179. Connection pointAudio jack ribbon cable