PRAISE FOR A WOMAN’S GUIDE TOSUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATING“A useful book for women on the art of negotiating . . . in busi-ness, ...
OTHER BOOKS BY LEE E. MILLERGet More Money on Your Next Job . . . in Any Economy,Revised and UpdatedUP: Influence, Power an...
A Woman’s         Guide toSuccessfulNegotiating How to Convince, Collaborate, &  Create Your Way to Agreement             ...
Copyright © 2011 by Lee E. Miller and Jessica Miller. All rights reserved. Except as permittedunder the United States Copy...
We would like to dedicate this book to Samantha, Francia, Joanna,Michelle, Jodi, Rebecca, Lindsey, Brittany, Nicole, Hanna...
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Contents                  A CK NOW LEDGMEN TS    IX   I N T RODUCT ION YOU D ON ’ T H AV E TO G I V E U P W HO         YOU...
viii   CONTENTS          CHAPTER 7 Every Day Can Be Valentine’s Day:              Getting What You Want from Your         ...
AcknowledgmentsWe would like to give special thanks to our editor, NancyHancock, who supported this project from its incep...
x   ACKNOWLEDGMENTSTony Awards, an Emmy, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards;Carolyn Kepchar, founder of WorkHerWay.com and...
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS   xiBloomberg Television; Dee Soder, Ph.D., founder and managingpartner, CEO Perspective Group; Pat Mastan...
xii   ACKNOWLEDGMENTSSyndrome; Claire Costello, vice president, philanthropic advise-ment, Citigroup Private Bank; Joanne ...
Introduction              You shall gain what men gain,          but by other means. And so the world                  mak...
xiv   INTRODUCTION   How often have you agreed to something, then looked back andwondered, “What was I thinking? How did t...
INTRODUCTION   xvsituations to ensure that your interests are protected. Althoughyou may not always get everything you wan...
xvi   INTRODUCTIONon vacation or where to go for dinner. You negotiate with yourchildren about curfews, allowances, and ch...
INTRODUCTION   xviiwe interviewed who felt that way. If an accomplished negotiatorfeels like that, we have little doubt yo...
xviii   INTRODUCTIONare a means to the end. For women, relationships are an end inand of themselves, wholly separate from ...
INTRODUCTION   xixeveryone’s interests. Collaborate incorporates and expands uponthe win-win negotiating model. You achiev...
xx   INTRODUCTION       I wanted to coauthor this book with my father because my abil-       ity to negotiate has helped m...
INTRODUCTION   xxiGuide Magazine, my experience teaching courses on influencingand negotiating to both men and women at Col...
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1   You can have anything you want—if you want it   badly enough. You can be anything you want to    be, do anything you s...
2   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGnot fall neatly within one of the convince, collaborate, or createcategories,...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   3depends more on how you say it than on what you actually say.Put another way, to be truly per...
4   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGter the art of negotiating, you must not only learn how; you mustalso practic...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   5lack experience. Like any other skill, negotiating can be learned.And you should consider any...
6   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGare in control of the situation. Allison McGowen advises: “Ifyou don’t know w...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   7speak softly as long as you speak with conviction. We are refer-ring to a quiet confidence, no...
8   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGBE PREPARED, OR BE PREPARED TO FAILI’m a great believer in luck, and I find th...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   9Don’t limit yourself to using search engines like Google. CarolBiaggi, a producer and reporte...
10   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGfor wanting to do so is to prevent anything from being built thatwould impai...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   11to people who do. Avoid the “Me perspective,” that is, looking atissues from your viewpoint ...
12   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGintended either because you convince them they should or simplybecause the n...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   13to increase your offer. As we will discuss later, your BATNAdetermines the point at which yo...
14   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGoffer, or your response, if the other side has already made or willmake, the...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   15   If you must make this deal, if you must have this apartment,or if you simply must go to a...
16   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGtant thing was that she meant it. Because she was willing to giveup the deal...
THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS   17she was booking entertainment for cruise lines. She was tryingto convince the entertainment ...
2           An error doesn’t become a mistake                until you refuse to correct it.                    — O R L A ...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   19BE YOURSELF, BUT BE THE BEST SELF YOU CAN BESeek out that...
20   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATING       sonality into every negotiating situation. I am firm, but I try to   ...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   21     the office. This wardrobe made the right impression ...
22   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGsome women, to avoid being labeled a “bitch,” are cowed intogiving up too ea...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   23men.” But it doesn’t work for them. She advises women to ...
24   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGsate for your weaknesses. It will also enable you to recognizewhen you lack ...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   25dents actually took her up on her offer and were admitted...
26   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGinitially presented to us without questioning it. But the reality isthere’s ...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   27particularly young women, typically don’t negotiate when ...
28   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGlearned the importance of asking for what you want when she gotto the White ...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   29  In general, even if you don’t get everything you ask fo...
30   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGthe best they could. When you ask for more than you expect andaccept that ne...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   31who are excellent negotiators may find it difficult to nego...
32   A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGher not to offer that much. Although her fear of losing the apart-ment was a...
THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM   33ing into adulthood.” Dr. Patricia Farrell believes that w...
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A womans guide to success negotiating

  1. 1. PRAISE FOR A WOMAN’S GUIDE TOSUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATING“A useful book for women on the art of negotiating . . . in busi-ness, in personal relationships, in every area of life.” —Donna Lagani, Publishing Director, The Cosmopolitan Group“Whether you are in the boardroom or at home with your kids,this book shows you how to get what you want and do it withstyle.” —Lisa Gersch, President, Strategic Initiatives, NBC Universal“An invaluable source of wisdom for women, young and old, whowant to take their place in the world.”—Christine Baranski, Emmy- and Tony-Award–Winning Actress“This is a must-read book for women everywhere, whether full-timemoms, corporate executives, or students. The advice the authorsshare to help today’s woman succeed in negotiating calls for a sighof relief in a competitive, male-dominated world. Thank you.” —Terrie Williams, Author of The Personal Touch“Negotiation is important to every aspect of our lives, . . . bothprofessional and personal. Lee and Jessica Miller have created asolid reference book that is both helpful and fun to read. I recom-mend it enthusiastically.”—Joan Shapiro Green, President, Financial Women’s Association“The definitive negotiating guide for women. The fact that a fatherand daughter could actually get this book to print speaks volumesabout their individual negotiating skills.”—Joan Verplanck, President, New Jersey Chamber of Commerce
  2. 2. OTHER BOOKS BY LEE E. MILLERGet More Money on Your Next Job . . . in Any Economy,Revised and UpdatedUP: Influence, Power and the U Perspective—The Art ofGetting What You Want
  3. 3. A Woman’s Guide toSuccessfulNegotiating How to Convince, Collaborate, & Create Your Way to Agreement Second Edition Lee E. Miller Jessica MillerNew York Chicago San Francisco Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Milan New Delhi San Juan Seoul Singapore Sydney Toronto
  4. 4. Copyright © 2011 by Lee E. Miller and Jessica Miller. All rights reserved. Except as permittedunder the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced ordistributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without theprior written permission of the publisher.ISBN: 978-0-07-174651-9MHID: 0-07-174651-XThe material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: ISBN: 978-0-07-174650-2,MHID: 0-07-174650-1.All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbolafter every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and tothe benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Wheresuch designations appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps.McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and salespromotions, or for use in corporate training programs. To contact a representative pleasee-mail us at bulksales@mcgraw-hill.com.This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to thesubject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that neither the author nor the publisheris engaged in rendering legal, accounting, securities trading, or other professional services. Iflegal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professionalperson should be sought.—From a Declaration of Principles Jointly Adopted by a Committee of the AmericanBar Association and a Committee of Publishers and AssociationsTERMS OF USEThis is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGrawHill”) and itslicensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms.Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copyof the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, createderivative works based upon, transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense thework or any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your ownnoncommercial and personal use; any other use of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right touse the work may be terminated if you fail to comply with these terms.THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKENO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY ORCOMPLETENESS OF OR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK,INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THEWORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANYWARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIEDWARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in thework will meet your requirements or that its operation will be uninterrupted or error free. NeitherMcGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission,regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting therefrom. McGraw-Hill hasno responsibility for the content of any information accessed through the work. Under nocircumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable for any indirect, incidental,special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use of or inability touse the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages. Thislimitation of liability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or causearises in contract, tort or otherwise.
  5. 5. We would like to dedicate this book to Samantha, Francia, Joanna,Michelle, Jodi, Rebecca, Lindsey, Brittany, Nicole, Hannah, Taylor, little Samantha, Julia, and Cameron—all the cousins who are young women in our family for whom we hope this book will provide inspiration.
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  7. 7. Contents A CK NOW LEDGMEN TS IX I N T RODUCT ION YOU D ON ’ T H AV E TO G I V E U P W HO YOU A R E TO G ET W H AT YOU D ESERV E XIII`CHAPTER 1 The Three Keys to Success: Be Confident, Be Prepared, and Be Willing to Walk Away 1CHAPTER 2 The 10 Most Common Mistakes Women Make and How to Avoid Them 18 CHAPTER 3 Convince: Changing the Way Others See Things 59 CHAPTER 4 Collaborate: Changing to a Problem-Solving Approach, or How to Satisfy Everyone’s Interests 100 CHAPTER 5 Create: If You Don’t Like the Rules, Change the Game—Changing the Way We Negotiate 120 CHAPTER 6 Mars and Venus: Negotiating with Men versus Negotiating with Women 134 vii
  8. 8. viii CONTENTS CHAPTER 7 Every Day Can Be Valentine’s Day: Getting What You Want from Your Significant Other 146 CHAPTER 8 Negotiating with Your Family: If You Can Negotiate with a Two-Year-Old, You Can Negotiate with Anyone 165 CHAPTER 9 How to Succeed in Business: Equal Pay for Equal Work—but Not unless You Negotiate for It 174 CHAPTER 10 Buying or Leasing a Car: Be Prepared for Traditional Negotiating Tactics, or Change the Way You Negotiate 197 CHAPTER 11 Buying and Selling Real Estate: A Woman’s Place Is in the Home— Whether You’re Buying or Selling 210 CHAPTER 12 Divorce: Don’t Get Even, but Get Enough 225 CHAPTER 13 Virtual Negotiating for Women: When You Cannot Be There in Person 245 A PPENDIX N EGOT I AT ING S KILLS A ND A T T IT UDES C HECK LIST 257 I NDEX 260
  9. 9. AcknowledgmentsWe would like to give special thanks to our editor, NancyHancock, who supported this project from its inception andwhose guidance and insights have been invaluable; Joseph Cicio,former chairman, I. Magnin, and creative merchandising con-sultant; Maria Dorfner, CEO NewsMD Communications; SaraMiller-Moe, president, Sew Inspired Inc.; Rick Hayes, appraiser,commercial real estate, Chaney & Associates; and KathleenHayes Onieal, consultant, Monitor Group. We would also like to thank the following women for sharingtheir wisdom and experience with us: Cathie Black, chairman,Hearst Magazines; Andrea Jung, chair and chief executive offi-cer of Avon Products; Audrey Cramer, vice chair, Cushman &Wakefield; Cari Dominguez, former chair of the Equal Employ-ment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); Lisa Gersch, presidentof strategic initiatives, NBC Universal; Alexis Glick, formeranchor and vice president of business news at the Fox BusinessNetwork; Lisa Bloom, legal analyst for CNN and a principal atthe Bloom Law Firm; Carol Evans, president and CEO, WorkingMother Media; Janice Lieberman, NBC Today Show consumerreporter and author of How to Shop for a Husband: How to Geta Great Buy on a Guy; Lisa Caputo, executive vice president,global marketing and corporate affairs at Citigroup and CEO ofCitigroup’s Women & Co. and former White House press secre-tary to Hillary Clinton; Katie Ford, chief executive officer, FordModeling Agency; Christine Baranski, actress and winner of two ix
  10. 10. x ACKNOWLEDGMENTSTony Awards, an Emmy, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards;Carolyn Kepchar, founder of WorkHerWay.com and one-timeregular on the television show The Apprentice; Jennifer Allyn,managing director, PricewaterhouseCoopers; Erin Noonan, chiefoperating officer for Americas Sourcing, Barclays Capital; AllisonMcGowen, former chief operating officer, Los Angeles Sparks ofthe WNBA; Jeanette Chang, publishing director, Hearst Maga-zines International; Donna Lagani, publishing director, Cosmo-politan Group, which publishes Cosmopolitan magazine; ToryJohnson, CEO of Women for Hire and workplace contributor onABC’s Good Morning America; Elaine Conway, director of theNew York State Commission on Women; Jerri DeVard, formerchief marketing officer, Citigroup; Katie Blackburn, executivevice president, NFL Cincinnati Bengals; Jennifer Valoppi, Emmy-Award-winning television journalist and founder of the Womenof Tomorrow Mentor and Scholarship Program; Carole Cooper,owner/agent, N. S. Bienstock, Inc.; Carol Raphael, president andCEO, Visiting Nurse Service of New York; Gail Evans, formerexecutive vice president of CNN, and author of Play Like a Man,Win Like a Woman; Susanna Hoffs, lead singer for the Bangles;Bonnie St. John, Olympic silver medalist and author of GettingAhead at Work Without Leaving Your Family Behind; TamarSimon Hoffs, producer, writer, and director; Sharon Taylor,senior vice president of human resources, Prudential Financial,Inc.; Anna Lloyd, president and executive director of the Com-mittee of 200; Diane Danielson, founder and chief social mediastrategist, Downtown Women’s Club; Terrie Williams, presidentof the Terrie Williams Agency and author of The Personal Touch;Judge Kathleen Roberts, mediator and former U.S. magistrate;Susan Medalie, executive director, Women’s Campaign Fund;Patricia Hambrecht, president, Harry Winston; Carolyn Wall,former publisher of Newsweek; Wendy Gillette, writer, producer,and reporter, CBS News; Carol Biaggi, producer and reporter,
  11. 11. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xiBloomberg Television; Dee Soder, Ph.D., founder and managingpartner, CEO Perspective Group; Pat Mastandrea, president,Cheyenne Group; Janice Reals Ellig, Co-CEO, Chaddick ElligInc. and author of What Every Successful Woman Knows; LeilLowndes, author of How to Make Anyone Fall in Love withYou; G. G. Michelson, former senior vice president of externalaffairs, R. H. Macy & Co., Inc.; Davia Temin, president, Teminand Company; Cathy Harbin, general manager, King & Bearand Slammer & Squire golf courses; Robin Tomchin, president,RT Productions; Nancy Settle, general counsel, L’Oréal Ltd.(United Kingdom); Patricia Farrell, Ph.D., professor and clini-cal psychologist; Terri Santisi, partner, KPMG, Global IndustryLeader Media and Entertainment Group; Randi Kahn, managingdirector, Citigroup; Kitty Van Bortel, owner, Van Bortel Subaru;Kitty D’Alessio, former president, Chanel; Jean Hollands, presi-dent, Growth and Leadership Center and author of Same Game,Different Rules; Bonnie Stone, president and CEO, Women InNeed; Martha Ward, director, Cushman & Wakefield; CristiKolvin, chief creative officer, Fresh ID; Claire Irving, president,Cranston Capital; Ellen Sandles, executive director, Tri-StatePrivate Investors Network; Emily Menlo Marks, executive direc-tor, United Neighborhood Houses of New York; Gina Doynow,North American community relations director, Citigroup; BrendaChristianson, president, Stellar Public Relations; Judy Rosemarin,president, Sense-Able Strategies, Inc.; Maxine Hartley, execu-tive career coach, Ayers Group; Jan Hopkins, former anchor,CNN Street Sweep; Carolyn Klemm, owner/broker, KlemmReal Estate; Lisa Brown, broker, Stribling Associates; MargeryHadar, vice president, William B. May Company; Linda Gedney,broker, Prudential Fox & Roach; Ronna Lichtenberg, president,Clear Peak Communications and author of It’s Not Business, It’sPersonal; Samantha Daniels, founder and president of Saman-tha’s Table; Karen Salmansohn, author of the Prince Harming
  12. 12. xii ACKNOWLEDGMENTSSyndrome; Claire Costello, vice president, philanthropic advise-ment, Citigroup Private Bank; Joanne Bobes, manager, Pruden-tial Insurance; Roberta Benjamin, partner, Benjamin & Benson;Vikki Ziegler, partner, Walder, Hayden and Brogan; Nancy ErikaSmith, partner, Smith & Mullin; Janet Brownlee, senior vicepresident, human resources, Donovan Data Systems; Dr. Alli-son Ashley, managing partner, Veracity International; Kay AnnHoogland, former vice president, global diversity and compliancefor Motorola; Marcia Lite, account executive, Automated DataProcessing; Lynn Newsome, partner, Donahue, Hagan, Kleinand Newsome; Jennifer Gibbs, Ph.D., assistant professor of com-munications at Rutgers; and Alice Stuhlmacher, Ph.D., associateprofessor of psychology at DePaul University.
  13. 13. Introduction You shall gain what men gain, but by other means. And so the world makes men and women. — O L I V E S CH R EI N ER You Don’t Have to Give Up Who You Are to Get What You DeserveJerri DeVard, former chief marketing officer for Citigroup anda member of the board of directors at Tommy Hilfiger, tells thestory about the day her three-year-old son got his first water gun.He ran around shooting everyone he saw. Later that day, a littlethree-year-old girl friend was dropped off at the house so theycould play together. When she saw the water gun, which by nowhe had grown tired of, lying on the floor, she immediately pickedit up and began to water the flowers with it. This story broughthome once again for us the fact that men and women see theworld very differently, even at a very young age. This is no lesstrue when it comes to how men and women go about trying toget what they want out of life. xiii
  14. 14. xiv INTRODUCTION How often have you agreed to something, then looked back andwondered, “What was I thinking? How did that ever happen?”You not only didn’t get what you wanted—you also agreed to dosomething you never intended to do. What about that raise youdeserve but do not have the nerve to ask for, or the assignmentyou want that the boss is thinking about giving to someone else?What about your new car, which you like but think you paid toomuch for? Why is it that you work as hard as your husband butseem to end up doing more than your share around the house?There is an art to getting what you deserve. It is called negotiat-ing. As the successful women we interviewed noted: whether youlike it or not, you have to “deal with it.” If you want to get whatyou deserve, you have no choice but to negotiate. Our goal is toshow women how to negotiate their way. Don’t compromise ongetting what you deserve. Instead, strategize. While compromiseis sometimes necessary, if you learn how to negotiate, you willnot have to compromise and give up the things that are reallyimportant to you. I once asked the students in my negotiating class to tell me howtheir lives would change if they were able to negotiate more effec-tively. One student said, “My car would have cost less. I wouldmake more money. I could get the home I want. And my hus-band would help more around the house.” Another said, “Peoplewouldn’t be able to take advantage of me.” A third said, “It wouldgive me the confidence to get what I want.” Still another replied,“I could change my community for the better.” All these thingsare possible when you master the art of negotiating. Alexis Glick, former anchor and vice president of businessnews at the Fox Business Network, captures the essence of whatnegotiating can do for you when she states: “If you know how tonegotiate, you control your own destiny. You don’t have to relyon others to do it for you.” You can decide what you will agree toand what you are not willing to accept. You will be able to shape
  15. 15. INTRODUCTION xvsituations to ensure that your interests are protected. Althoughyou may not always get everything you want, you will get morethan you ever imagined you could. More often than not, you willnot only get what you want but you will also help others accom-plish their objectives at the same time. If you are like most women, you don’t feel completely comfort-able negotiating. It is not something you were taught to do whenyou were growing up. In fact, young girls are often taught, subtlyand not so subtly, to defer or manipulate rather than negotiate,especially in their dealings with men. They are expected to usetheir “feminine wiles” to get what they want because it has his-torically been considered “unladylike” to negotiate with men. Jennifer Allyn, a managing director at PricewaterhouseCoopers,believes that one of the reasons women often have difficulty nego-tiating is that they “take rejection hard.” She observes, “Men havemore practice being rejected because they have to ask women outfor dates. Women just have to say yes or no and therefore don’thave as much experience being rejected.” She advises, “Practicewill enable you to get past that.” As Cathie Black, chairman of Hearst Magazines, which pub-lishes Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, O, The Oprah Magazine,Redbook, Seventeen, and Harper’s Bazaar, notes, “Some womenare uncomfortable with the word negotiating. They consider it atough, hard, male word.” Yet you are negotiating all day, everyday, even though you may not think of it that way. You negotiatewith your husband about who will make breakfast for the kids,about what kind of car to purchase, and about whether to buya new refrigerator or to just fix the old one. You negotiate withyour boyfriend about what movie to see and whether or not tohave a big wedding. You negotiate with your boss about gettinga raise, about the time off you need, or about an assignment youwant. You negotiate with customers and vendors about prices anddelivery schedules. You negotiate with friends about where to go
  16. 16. xvi INTRODUCTIONon vacation or where to go for dinner. You negotiate with yourchildren about curfews, allowances, and chores. And you negoti-ate when you buy a car, buy or sell a house, or get a divorce. Suppose you are at a restaurant with a friend, and she asks,“Would you like to share a piece of apple pie for dessert?” Whenyou reply, “I really feel like having chocolate cake,” you are nego-tiating. Whenever two people don’t agree, they negotiate. Theymay not sit around a bargaining table or make proposals andcounterproposals, but the only way two people can reach work-able solutions is by negotiating. As Emily Menlo Marks, executivedirector of United Neighborhood Houses of New York, puts it:“All life is a negotiation. It’s not a question of liking or not likingto negotiate. It’s a matter of doing it.” If you think of children dividing up a loaf of bread as negotiat-ing, then it loses some of its negative connotations. Dividing upthe bread does not mean that one person gets the whole loaf andthe others get only crumbs. Rather, they can divide it up fairly, ina way that fosters their continuing friendship. If one has bread,another has peanut butter, and a third has jelly, the benefits ofnegotiating are obvious. Once you understand that negotiating isreally about obtaining someone else’s help to get what you want,you readily recognize that arguing, screaming, and haggling arerarely effective. Common sense tells you that those tactics willnot work for people with whom you have, or want to establish, arelationship. Those are the very people with whom you have themost important negotiations. They are your bosses, coworkers,husbands, boyfriends, family members, friends, vendors, custom-ers, and prospective customers. Nancy Settle, general counsel for L’Oréal Ltd. (United King-dom), the multinational cosmetic company whose brands includeMaybelline, Lancôme, and Redken, negotiates for a living, andshe is very good at it. Yet when asked if she likes to negotiate, sheresponded, “No, it’s too contentious.” She is not the only woman
  17. 17. INTRODUCTION xviiwe interviewed who felt that way. If an accomplished negotiatorfeels like that, we have little doubt you probably share that feel-ing. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Most of the women weinterviewed admitted that they actually enjoy negotiating—nowthat they are comfortable with the process. Men and women view negotiations differently. As Gail Evans,a former executive vice president at CNN and author of Play Likea Man, Win Like a Woman, told us, “Women are different. Wewere brought up differently; we think differently.” To understandhow those differences affect the way women negotiate, you needto recognize that negotiations involve not only outcomes butrelationships as well. All negotiations can be seen as falling somewhere on a con-tinuum in terms of the importance we place on each of thesetwo dimensions: the outcome and the relationship. On one endof the continuum are negotiations in which you care a lot aboutthe outcome and almost nothing about the relationship, such aswhen you negotiate with a used-car salesperson. You are dealingwith a stranger that you don’t trust and will probably never seeagain; all you really care about are the features you want and thelowest possible price. On the other end of the spectrum are nego-tiations with a boss or potential business partners with whomyou will continue to work in the future. In these situations, anyone deal may be much less important than the ongoing workingrelationship. Similarly, most negotiations with family and friendsfall on the relationship end of the continuum. However, alwaysgiving in, even when something is important to you, can createproblems in a relationship. Although the relationship dimension exists to some degree inmost negotiations, women tend to place greater importance onthe relationship in almost every type of negotiation. Men tendto remain focused on outcomes while making an effort to avoiddamaging relationships they care about. For men, relationships
  18. 18. xviii INTRODUCTIONare a means to the end. For women, relationships are an end inand of themselves, wholly separate from any tangible benefitsthey can derive from them. The intrinsic value women placeon relationships affects how they view negotiations. As a result,women sometimes allow relationships to get in the way of achiev-ing their desired outcomes. Brenda Christianson, president ofStellar Public Relations summarized these tendencies this way:“Women want to see that you are their friend before they engagein negotiations. Men don’t care about the relationship. It’s allabout the deal.” Women can, however, use their relationship skills to help themnegotiate better. In writing this book, we have developed a way ofthinking about negotiations that works for both men and womenbut is particularly powerful for women. Our approach recognizesthe importance that women place on relationships and treats thatas a strength, not a weakness. Our negotiating model consists of three basic approaches fromwhich you can choose at different times during negotiation: con-vince, collaborate, and create. Convince refers to changing the way the person you are deal-ing with views what you are proposing. It focuses on presentingyour ideas in a way that enhances the perceived value of whatyou are seeking. You accomplish that by convincing others thatit is in their interest to do what you are proposing or that whatyou are suggesting supports values that are important to them.This approach draws from the study of rhetoric (persuasion),body language, and traditional distributive negotiating tactics.In Chapter 3, we provide you with the convince tools, such asactive listening, purposeful questioning, using concessions, andanchoring, that will enable you to persuade someone to do whatyou want. Collaborate refers to both sides’ changing the negotiatingfocus to one of problem solving. The goal is to find ways to satisfy
  19. 19. INTRODUCTION xixeveryone’s interests. Collaborate incorporates and expands uponthe win-win negotiating model. You achieve your objectives byworking with the other people involved to come up with a solu-tion that accommodates everyone’s interests. In Chapter 4, youlearn how to use collaborate tools, such as coupling interests,trading, and expanding the pie, to reach mutually satisfactoryagreements. Create refers to changing the way you structure the negotiationsby taking a fresh look at how things have been done in the pastand coming up with more effective ways to achieve your objectives.Create helps you to find ways to negotiate that better fit your needsor your negotiating style. As discussed in Chapter 5, sometimes thebest way to get what you want is to come up with a new way ofresolving the issue—a different negotiating paradigm. In any particular negotiation, you may emphasize one of thesethree as your primary approach. However, you can use all three,in varying degrees, in almost every negotiating situation. Judge Kathy Roberts, a professional mediator and former U.S.magistrate, summarizes our basic philosophy when she states: Women often underestimate the value of having a full repertoire of negotiating skills. A lot of women are more open to the win- win, problem-solving approach and really don’t learn the skills you need where the situation is fundamentally distributive and you are dividing up the pie. Women need to learn how to use all those skills together. They need to be more sophisticated in how they approach negotiating. The best negotiators convince and collaborate simultaneously.Create can also be added to the mix in most negotiations. Youwill learn how to recognize when conditions are right to empha-size a collaborative approach and when your primary approachshould be to convince or create. As you become more skilled, youwill develop a sense for when and how to shift approaches withinthe context of any given negotiation. Jessica states:
  20. 20. xx INTRODUCTION I wanted to coauthor this book with my father because my abil- ity to negotiate has helped me in every aspect of my life. When I was growing up, most of my negotiating involved situations you would not ordinarily think of as negotiations—with friends, with teachers, or with my parents and siblings. Today I con- stantly negotiate in business as well as in my personal life. The lessons we want to impart to our readers are the same ones I learned from my dad at a very early age. This book provides me with an opportunity to share those lessons. Jessica’s qualifications to coauthor this book are obvious. Sheis currently a commercial real estate advisor with Cushman &Wakefield, where she is routinely involved in million-dollar nego-tiations. She joined the firm as a director in 2009 after eight yearsas a commercial real estate advisor with Grubb & Ellis Company,where she was the youngest vice president in the Washington,D.C., region. Prior to entering the real estate industry, Jessicawas an investment banking analyst with Deutsche Bank. Jes-sica also teaches negotiating skills to women’s groups where sheprovides training in “How Women Can Get What They Want”out of everything in their life. Not only has she been successfulin traditionally male-dominated industries but she has also wonany number of awards for her leadership. Most importantly, as anexceptional negotiator, she can provide unique insights into whatit takes for a woman to negotiate successfully. You may be asking yourself what qualifies me to write thisbook. I could talk about my training at Harvard Law School,my years practicing law as a partner in one of the preeminentemployment law firms in the country, where I negotiated laborcontracts and employment agreements, my experience as vicepresident of employee and labor relations at Macy’s or as head ofhuman resources at Barneys New York, USA Networks, and TV
  21. 21. INTRODUCTION xxiGuide Magazine, my experience teaching courses on influencingand negotiating to both men and women at Columbia Universityand in the MBA program at Seton Hall University or the semi-nars I teach on negotiating for women. I could also point to thebody of interviews we conducted with successful women acrossa wide range of fields, upon which this book is based. However, what truly qualifies me to write this book is that Iam the father of two exceptional daughters. I wanted to equipthem to be successful in their personal and professional lives,and to do that, one of the most important things I taught themwas how to negotiate. That is why I wanted to write this bookwith Jessica. No woman to whom we have spoken about this project hasbeen anything but enthusiastic. We became convinced that therewas a critical need for this book when the 25-year-old femalepublic relations executive assigned to evaluate the idea told oureditor, “If we don’t publish this, I want to know who the pub-lisher is because this is a book I have to read.” Now that the bookis finished, we are just as convinced of the need for it as we werewhen we started.
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  23. 23. 1 You can have anything you want—if you want it badly enough. You can be anything you want to be, do anything you set out to accomplish if you hold to that desire with singleness of purpose. —A BR A H A M L I NCOL N The Three Keys to Success Be Confident, Be Prepared, and Be Willing to Walk AwayIn writing this book, we interviewed women from all walks oflife—corporate executives, lawyers, investment bankers, pub-lishers, politicians, entrepreneurs, writers, musicians, actresses,agents, journalists, philanthropists, athletes—all very successful.Most have strong collaborative skills, many are extremely persua-sive, and some excel at taking the negotiating situation they findand creating a different one that better suits their needs. Inter-estingly, almost universally they listed the same three qualitiesas being critical to success as a negotiator: confidence, prepara-tion, and a willingness to walk away. These three qualities do 1
  24. 24. 2 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGnot fall neatly within one of the convince, collaborate, or createcategories, but rather, they are central to all three approaches.They are attitudes that you bring to negotiating. They form theunderpinnings that enable someone to effectively use each of thethree approaches.BE CONFIDENT: WHY MEN DON’T ASK FOR DIRECTIONSClass is an aura of confidence that is being sure without beingcocky. Class has nothing to do with money. . . . It is self-dis-cipline and self-knowledge. It’s the sure-footedness that comeswith having proved you can meet life. —A NN L ANDERSSusanna Hoffs had just put together the Bangles, which wouldbecome the dominant all-female rock band of the 1980s, garnerfour platinum albums, and see two of their many hit singles,“Walk Like an Egyptian” and “Eternal Flame,” make it to the topof the charts. She was performing with the band at a local club.Miles Copeland, the manager who had engineered the earliersuccess of the Go-Gos, approached them after the show to talkabout representing them. Rather than acting as if she should begrateful for his interest, Susanna says, “I took the position thathe should want to work with us because we were going places.”It helped, of course, that at the time she had no idea who MilesCopeland was, and therefore she didn’t know she should benervous. Because of the confidence with which Susanna and theother Bangles approached those negotiations, they were able towork out a favorable deal to have Miles manage the group. Confidence is the secret weapon in negotiating. Almost everywoman we interviewed pointed to it as the key to their successas a negotiator. To gain agreement from others, you need to per-suade them that what you are proposing is based on an accurateunderstanding of the facts, is fair, and is mutually beneficial.Studies have shown that whether someone believes what you say
  25. 25. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 3depends more on how you say it than on what you actually say.Put another way, to be truly persuasive, whatever you say, youmust say with confidence. You can take several steps to build your confidence. Erin Noo-nan, chief operating officer for Americas Sourcing at BarclaysCapital, recommends reading books and taking classes on nego-tiating, which she “has done plenty of” over the course of hercareer. Understanding the negotiating process will add to yourself-confidence. Often you will instinctively know the right thingto do, and all you need is confirmation. One of the nicest thingsanyone said about my first book, Get More Money on Your NextJob, which dealt with negotiating in the employment context,came from a young woman who told me that reading it gave herthe confidence to ask a prospective employer to pay for her MBA.She told me, “It affirmed that what I was doing was okay.”PracticeYou gain confidence through practice. Put the skills you learnfrom this book to use on a daily basis. Practice the active listen-ing and purposeful questioning skills we discuss in Chapter 3until you master them. Try using them at the dinner table withyour husband and children. When others ask you for something,or you hear them ask someone else for something, try to use thecollaborative skill of determining the underlying interests he orshe is trying to satisfy. Like driving a car, negotiating is a skill that must be learned.After reading the driver’s manual and receiving your learner’spermit, you don’t just get into the car for the first time and knowhow to drive. You attend a driver’s education class, you takedriving lessons, or a parent or friend teaches you. While takinglessons, you also practice driving. You practice turning. Youpractice merging into traffic. You practice parallel parking, andthen you practice parallel parking some more. Similarly, to mas-
  26. 26. 4 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGter the art of negotiating, you must not only learn how; you mustalso practice. The more you practice, the more comfortable youwill become. Remember how nervous you were the first time youdrove on a highway? By now, you no longer even give it a secondthought. Like driving, once you have done it enough, negotiatingsimply becomes second nature.Find out about the People on the Other SideAnother way to boost your confidence is to learn as much asyou can about the people with whom you will be negotiating. AsJudge Kathy Roberts, a professional mediator and former U.S.magistrate, put it: It is amazing that people don’t do research about their adversar- ies. This is particularly important for women because if you find out about your opponent, you will be more confident. You will know what to expect. You can anticipate things. If you know someone is known for threatening to walk out at some point or for taunting women, you will not have the same reaction because you know it is coming. You will have thought out how you will respond when it happens. The best way to find out about those with whom you are nego-tiating is to ask people who know them and who have negotiatedwith them before. The more you know about what to expect, themore confident you will be.Confidence Equals SuccessThe more confidence you exude, the better you will negotiate.Conversely, insecurity reduces effectiveness, and a lack of suc-cess will further hurt your confidence. Because women typicallydo not learn to negotiate when they are growing up, as adultsthey are uncomfortable with their ability to do so. This lack ofconfidence frequently translates into poor results. So, they cometo believe they are bad negotiators, when in fact they simply
  27. 27. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 5lack experience. Like any other skill, negotiating can be learned.And you should consider any negotiation successful if you learnsomething from it. Moreover, a negotiation does not necessarilyend if you don’t immediately reach an agreement. Sometimes thevenue just changes. You will generally have other opportunitiesto get what you want by going back and trying again—with thesame party at a later date, with someone else, or in some otherway. The lessons you learn from one negotiation will help you inyour next negotiation and every one thereafter.Act ConfidentUntil you have gained sufficient confidence by mastering negoti-ating skills, simply act as if you know what you are doing: “Fakeit until you make it.” That is what men do. Men are every bit asuncomfortable as women when it comes to doing things that arenew to them. Allison McGowen, formerly the chief operatingofficer for the Los Angeles Sparks of the WNBA, notes the differ-ence is that “men are raised not to show their fear.” While grow-ing up, boys do not share their insecurities with their friends; asJessica notes girls do. Instead, boys learn to put on a show of bra-vado. If someone pushes them, they push back—no matter howbig the pusher or how scared they are. Boys seldom display fearin front of their male friends or, heaven forbid, their girlfriends.In fact, the more nervous men are, the more confident they try toact. Have you ever noticed how many men spend an entire firstdate talking about how terrific they are (even though this oftenresults in its being their last date)? This is not just ego at work.It is nervousness, masked by bravado. That is why men don’t ask for directions. They do not wantto show weakness. They would rather drive around aimlesslyfor hours. When you are lost, not asking for directions is silly.When you are negotiating, acting confident even when you arenot, works. So, regardless of how you actually feel, act as if you
  28. 28. 6 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGare in control of the situation. Allison McGowen advises: “Ifyou don’t know what you are doing, act like you do and then gofigure it out.” Exhibit confidence with the words you use, by the way youspeak, and through your demeanor. Positive body language willsignal confidence. Move forward to your audience. Uncross yourarms. Use open-hand, palms-up gestures. Unbutton your jacket.Look the other person in the eye. Demonstrate that you are incontrol. TIPS FOR PROJECTING CONFIDENCE Prepare. Psych yourself up. Take a deep breath, exhale, and relax. Smile. Stand or sit up straight. Don’t fidget. Speak slowly. Be firm. Moderate your tone. Project your voice. Patricia Farrell, Ph.D., professor of clinical psychology atWalden University and author of How to Be Your Own Therapist,advises: “Psych yourself up before you begin.” She calls this “self-talk.” Convince yourself that your position is right and that youdeserve what you are seeking. If you believe it, so will the peoplewith whom you are negotiating. Smile, look people in the eye,speak slowly, don’t fidget, moderate your tone, and project yourvoice. Demonstrate that you are capable of being firm. You can
  29. 29. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 7speak softly as long as you speak with conviction. We are refer-ring to a quiet confidence, not arrogance or bravado. When younegotiate, you don’t have to know every detail. In fact, sometimesadmitting that you do not know, or don’t remember, somethingactually enhances your credibility. However, admitting to notknowing a detail is not the same as failing to display confidencein the positions you are advocating. Carol Raphael, president and CEO of the Visiting Nurses Ser-vice of New York, was advised by a top labor negotiator the firsttime she had to negotiate a labor agreement: “Act decisively andexude confidence, even if you’re quaking inside.” She has taken thatadvice to heart, and not only with regard to union negotiations. Nomatter what she is feeling, she projects confidence: “Sometimes Iwill step out of the room and may feel queasy and uncomfortable,but no one will ever know it because when I walk back in the roomI am unflappable.” Remember the tagline from the old Secretdeodorant commercials, “Never let them see you sweat”? That isgood advice when you negotiate. If you are in doubt about what todo, find an excuse to take a break and seek advice. A corollary to being confident is not to be apologetic about thepositions you are taking, particularly if you are negotiating withmen. Women often start off their statements with phrases suchas “You may have already considered this, but . . .” or “I couldbe wrong, but . . .” Men view such statements as a sign of weak-ness and lack of conviction. Regardless of what you say after that,men will assume that you are willing to back down from yourposition. Instead, show that you want to collaborate. Be mag-nanimous. Say things like, “That’s a good point” or “I’ve thoughtabout what you said and . . .” Such statements do not show a lackof conviction but rather that you are secure enough in your posi-tion to modify it to accommodate their concerns. Ultimately, asone senior executive we interviewed put it: “When you’re dealingwith men, never apologize unless you step on their foot.”
  30. 30. 8 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGBE PREPARED, OR BE PREPARED TO FAILI’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the moreI have of it. —THOMAS J EFFERSONNegotiations are won or lost before you ever utter a word to theother party. Proper preparation is critical to achieving a success-ful outcome. Skilled negotiators understand the importance ofpreparation. Most of the women we interviewed even used thesame phrase: “Do your homework.” Lisa Bloom, legal analystfor CNN and a principal at the Bloom Law Firm, attributes hersuccess as a young lawyer to always being better prepared thananyone else. She took the metaphor one step further by adding,“And do the extra credit reading.” Preparation may involve months of research, or as little as afew minutes that you set aside to think about things before youbegin. Many of the negotiations you encounter on a daily basiswill allow almost no time for preparation. Although each situa-tion is different, here are some basic steps you should take beforeevery negotiation.Gather the Necessary InformationWe cannot overemphasize the importance of understanding thefacts, the players, and the “rules of the game.” Before you beginto negotiate, gain a thorough mastery of the facts. Figure outwhich questions you want to ask, both to gain information and tomake a point. Anticipate what questions the other side will ask,and determine how you plan to respond to them. Gather information about the people with whom you’ll bedealing. Are they honest? Can you trust them? Will they try tointimidate you? Do you know anyone in common? What is theirnegotiating style? In addition to talking with people that knowthem, the Internet offers an easy way to gather information.
  31. 31. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 9Don’t limit yourself to using search engines like Google. CarolBiaggi, a producer and reporter for Bloomberg Television, notes,“Social media can be a huge advantage in finding out about thepeople you are negotiating with.” Try to determine how the other side expects the negotiationsto proceed. Who do they expect will make the initial offer; howlong do they think the process should take; and what do theydefine as proper etiquette? In other words, what are the “rules ofthe game”? Once you understand that, you can choose an appro-priate strategy for playing the game—or whether this is even agame you want to play. Once you have researched the basic facts, done your analysis,and figured out what you want, you are ready to begin. You cannever know everything, but you can start and continue gatheringinformation and make adjustments as you go along. Negotiatingis an adaptive process. Today’s world moves at “Internet speed.”We are a society operating in real time, so making decisions ortaking actions based on incomplete information is unavoidable.Prepare as much as you reasonably can, then move forward withconfidence, knowing that you are probably better prepared thanthe person with whom you are dealing, particularly if you arenegotiating with a man.Decide on Your Goals and ObjectivesSuccess in any negotiation requires knowing what you want. AsYogi Berra once said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, anyroad will get you there.” Make a list of the things you would liketo get; then prioritize which are most important. When you aredeveloping your list, think about your underlying interests, notjust what you want. Interests are why we want the things that wewant. For example, you may want to purchase the empty lot nextto your house to ensure that your view of the lake remains unob-structed. Buying the property is what you want, but your reason
  32. 32. 10 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGfor wanting to do so is to prevent anything from being built thatwould impair your view. Focusing on your real interests, as wellas your neighbors’, may enable you to reach an agreement thataccomplishes your goal even if they don’t want to sell. By focus-ing on the underlying interests, you will see that there are waysto accomplish your objective other than purchasing the property.For example, you could get your neighbors to agree not to buildanything that would obstruct your view in return for allowingthem to share your driveway from the main road.Determine the Other Person’s InterestsBegin by finding out everything you can about the people withwhom you are negotiating. What do they want? Why do theywant it? What do they really need? What else do they careabout? To do that, you may need to determine who besides thenegotiator has a say in the outcome. When you are selling yourhouse, for example, the real estate broker may be talking to thehusband, but his wife may be calling the shots. If you want toclose the deal, you must find out what she cares about. In thatexample, you could probably find out who is involved in the deci-sion making and what is important to them by asking the realestate broker. Bonnie Stone, president and chief executive officer of WomenIn Need, a nonprofit organization that runs homeless shelters,said it well: Do your homework, and do the other person’s homework. You need to know exactly what his or her needs are. The more you know, the easier it will be to craft a deal. To be successful, you have to know what the other person needs and wants. How do you do that? Determine how he or she thinks andwhat he or she cares about. If the other party is your husband, orsomeone you know well, you will probably have a good sense ofhow the person thinks. If you don’t know the other parties, talk
  33. 33. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 11to people who do. Avoid the “Me perspective,” that is, looking atissues from your viewpoint rather than considering them fromthe other person’s point of view. Talking to people who know the industry and understand theissues can give you insight into how the other side looks at things.Sometimes it helps to have an informal meeting before you actu-ally start negotiating. This also gives you a chance to discuss howthe negotiations will proceed, to figure out what the issues are,or simply to get to know each other a little better. Preliminarymeetings are a perfect opportunity to find out what the other sidewants and needs. They will tell you. All you have to do is ask andthen listen.Determine the Range of Possible AgreementLet’s say you are talking with a prospective home buyer andthe lowest price you would be willing to accept is $240,000.Let’s assume that the most the prospective buyer is willing topay (something you won’t know with certainty) is $250,000.The range of possible settlement lies between $240,000 and$250,000. If you could figure out that $250,000 was the buyer’smaximum, you could hold out until you got $250,000 or anamount close to that. The more accurate you are in determiningthe other side’s range, the better you will be able to negotiate.One way to estimate ranges is by looking at the information avail-able to the other side. In this case, you would probably determinethe market value for this type of home by looking at what similarhomes in the neighborhood have sold for recently. Keep in mind that most negotiations involve more than oneissue. This allows for trade-offs between different issues. Forexample, in the employment context you may be able to negotiatea greater total compensation package if you are willing to accepta lower base salary in return for a larger potential bonus. More-over, people are often willing to give more than they initially had
  34. 34. 12 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGintended either because you convince them they should or simplybecause the negotiation has proceeded to the point that they havebecome psychologically invested in ensuring its success.Identify All the Possible OutcomesTry to develop an exhaustive list of options, and avoid makingjudgments until you have completed the list. Only after you havedeveloped a comprehensive list should you try to determine whichoutcomes would be best for you. For example, if you are negotiat-ing with an employer, you might consider a low salary with a highbonus potential, a high salary with a low bonus opportunity, ormore time off in return for a lower total compensation package,whether high salary and low bonus or low salary and high bonus.Simply having an exhaustive list will help you to be creative oncenegotiations begin and you start hearing from the other side.Determine Your BATNAAs part of your preparation, you must also identify your optionsin the event that you cannot reach an agreement. From amongthose, determine your BATNA. This term, coined by RogerFisher and William Ury in their seminal work on negotiatingGetting to Yes, stands for the “best alternative to a negotiatedagreement.” Put simply, it is what happens if you can’t agree. Asthe term “best” implies, you can have only one BATNA. YourBATNA determines the point at which accepting an offer doesn’tmake sense because you have a better option available. Knowingyour BATNA enables you to negotiate better because you knowwhat to expect if you cannot reach agreement. For example, ifyou have offered $200,000 to buy a house and the seller refusesto accept, if your BATNA is a house down the street that you likealmost as much and can purchase for $195,000, you are not likely
  35. 35. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 13to increase your offer. As we will discuss later, your BATNAdetermines the point at which you will walk away.Decide on an ApproachAre you going to try to convince, collaborate, create, or use somecombination of all three to achieve your goals? Look at yourself.Consider how you negotiate—that is, your strengths and weak-nesses. Then consider those of the other party. Ask yourself howthe negotiations would normally proceed. Then decide if youwant to use a create approach to change the negotiating paradigm.Determine who should make the first offer. (See the discussionof “anchoring” in Chapter 3, pages 77 to 84.) Then choose yourstrategy for handling the negotiations. After you do that, developan initial offer consistent with your chosen approach.Prepare AppropriatelyNot every negotiation calls for hours or weeks of preparation.Your daily interactions, such as deciding what movie you andyour friends will attend, do not require much preparation. Butknowing where and when various movies are playing and havingread the reviews will certainly give you a leg up in influencingthe decision. Moreover, sometimes you will encounter situationsfor which you have no time to prepare. Even if you just have afew minutes, though, spend them thinking about what you wantto do. Jot down a few thoughts. List what you want to get out ofthe negotiation. Determine the best possible outcome you couldhope for and your bottom line—the least you would be willingto accept. Figure out what the other side wants to get out of thenegotiations and how you can help satisfy those interests. Comeup with a few talking points as to why the other party shouldwant to do what you are proposing. Then decide on an opening
  36. 36. 14 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGoffer, or your response, if the other side has already made or willmake, the first offer. FIVE-MINUTE NEGOTIATING PREP List your goals. Determine your bottom line. Identify the other side’s interests. Outline your opening offer. List three ways your proposal satisfies the other party’s interests. Being well prepared not only gives you an advantage in thenegotiations but also boosts confidence. The better prepared youare, the more confident you will be. That added confidence willenable you to be a better negotiator.BE WILLING TO WALK AWAY: NO DEAL IS BETTER THANA BAD DEALTrue luck consists not in holding the best of the cards at thetable; luckiest is he who knows just when to rise and go home. —J OHN H AYWhen Alexis Glick was approached to join CNBC full time as asenior business correspondent, she was working on the tradingdesk at Morgan Stanley and had been appearing as a guest onSquawk Box. The network wanted her to sign a three-year con-tract, but she wanted the right to leave after a year if she didn’tlike it. That was a real sticking point for the network. If sheturned down the network’s offer, she knew that she could remainon Wall Street and “make three times as much money.” Becauseshe “always had in her mind that she could walk away from thedeal, even though she really wanted it,” she eventually got whatshe was asking for.
  37. 37. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 15 If you must make this deal, if you must have this apartment,or if you simply must go to a certain restaurant, you won’t nego-tiate well. You will pay too much, give too much, or just plainget “walked over.” Women want to be liked, and they care aboutwhat others think of them. They tend to blame themselves whenthey cannot reach agreement. As a result, they find it difficultto walk away. Men, on the other hand, usually blame the otherperson when they can’t reach an agreement, so they have less dif-ficulty walking away from deals not to their liking. Whether youare a man or a woman, though, to be a good negotiator you mustbe willing to walk away. Even if you have a great poker face, theother side will sense your need to complete the deal. Whetheryou are negotiating with an investment banker, your boss, oryour boyfriend, the other person will take advantage of the factthat you are not psychologically prepared to walk away. But youcan change that mindset: even though you may not think so atthe time, there is always another deal, another job, or anotherboyfriend. There will always be other opportunities. Christine Baranski, costar of the television series The GoodWife, is a gifted actress who has won two Tony Awards, anEmmy, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards for her work infilm, theater, and television. Yet she believes that early in hercareer she gave up too much when she negotiated because shelacked confidence and cared too much about what other peoplethought about her. Over time she has come to recognize not onlythe need to make clear from the start what is important to herbut also the power of being willing to walk away. When she wasnegotiating to produce and star in the television series Welcometo New York, having time with her children was a priority andshe wanted the network to accommodate her. To do so, the showhad to be shot on the East Coast and the shooting schedule hadto allow her time with her children, including a two-week Christ-mas break. She didn’t scream or carry on to get what she wanted.She just made it clear, through her agent, that she needed thoseaccommodations or she would not do the show. The most impor-
  38. 38. 16 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGtant thing was that she meant it. Because she was willing to giveup the deal, she got what she asked for. You don’t have to be a star to get what you want. You do needto understand the value of what you bring to the table and refuseto accept less. Although it is easier to determine the value of acar you are selling than your own worth, you determine value thesame way. Consider the market and your other options. As dis-cussed in Chapter 2, many women undervalue their own worth,so it’s good practice to review your analysis with someone else.Once you determine your bottom line, though, there’s no greaterpower than being willing to walk away. A good negotiator does everything reasonably possible toarrive at an agreement, starting with proper preparation. If youtry to understand what the other side needs, and you are creativein your approach, you can usually reach an agreement. Becausewomen tend to be more patient and often are willing to work atit longer, they can sometimes find a way to reach an agreementwhen men might not. But if you reach a point when what theother side is insisting on just doesn’t make sense for you, youmust be willing to walk away. Sometimes, not always, that willcause the other side to reconsider its position. As discussed previously, your preparation should includedetermining your BATNA—the best option available to you ifyou do not reach agreement. This is critical not only to being ableto walk away but also to knowing when to do so. Knowing thatyou have an alternative that is at least as good as what you arebeing offered makes it easier to walk away. Whether you are buy-ing a car, seeking a raise, or determining where to go on vacationwith your friends, determining your BATNA will greatly enhanceyour ability to bargain effectively. Leil Lowndes, the author of How to Make Anyone Fall inLove with You, understands the importance of being willing towalk away. She described a situation earlier in her career when
  39. 39. THE THREE KEYS TO SUCCESS 17she was booking entertainment for cruise lines. She was tryingto convince the entertainment director for American HawaiianCruise Lines to book musicals. His reaction to her presentationindicated to her that he was either not interested or he was pre-tending not to be to strengthen his bargaining position. Eitherway, she figured she might as well leave. So she said, “Well, Iknow you think this isn’t for you, so I might as well go.” Withthat, she got up from her chair and started to leave. He obviouslyhadn’t expected that reaction and called after her, “Now wait aminute.” So she sat back down, and eventually he agreed to bookSouth Pacific and My Fair Lady for his upcoming cruises. As we have seen, walking away is often not the end of thenegotiation. Although the other party may come back, you needto be prepared in the event that he or she does not. Having agood BATNA will help you do that. However, if you end thenegotiations on a positive note even when you haven’t been ableto reach an agreement, you leave the door open to the possibilityof future deals. Lisa Bloom, for example, was negotiating withWarren Littlefield, who when he was an executive vice presidentof NBC had developed shows like Cheers and The Golden Girls,about hosting a daytime talk show. Unfortunately they couldn’treach an agreement. But they parted on friendly terms, and Lisatold Littlefield that if something came up in the future whichhe thought she would be right for, he should give her a call. Sixmonths later one of the producers involved in those discussionsapproached her to do a show called Power of Attorney. Whether you are negotiating with a car dealer, your husband,or your boss, confidence, preparation, and a willingness to walkaway will help you get what you want. Remember, sometimes thebest result is to agree to disagree. No deal is almost always betterthan a bad deal.
  40. 40. 2 An error doesn’t become a mistake until you refuse to correct it. — O R L A N DO A. B AT T ISTA The 10 Most Common Mistakes Women Make and How to Avoid ThemSeveral common themes ran through the interviews for this bookregardless of the age, occupation, or experience of the womenbeing interviewed. It was surprising how many of them had madesimilar mistakes at some point during their lives. Based on thoseinterviews and Jessica’s own experiences, as well as my observa-tions working with women, we have identified 10 common mis-takes that women make. Fortunately, once you recognize that youare making them, these mistakes are remarkably easy to avoid. 18
  41. 41. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 19BE YOURSELF, BUT BE THE BEST SELF YOU CAN BESeek out that particular mental attribute which makes you feelmost deeply and vitally alive, along with which comes the innervoice which says, “This is the real me,” and when you have foundthat attitude, follow it. —W ILLIAM J AMESWomen often think that good negotiators act tough, scream,know all the tricks, and simply outsmart their opponents. Sowhen they are seeking to be successful negotiators, that is whatthey try to become. It usually doesn’t work. Why not? In the firstplace, that type of negotiating doesn’t even work for most men,despite the fact that many of them adopt that style. Women aregenerally more successful when they negotiate if they don’t try to“negotiate like a man.” Most women prefer a “relational negotiat-ing style” and are uncomfortable with a “competitive negotiatingstyle” (see Chapter 6, pages 137–138). To be successful, choosea negotiating style that makes you feel comfortable and reflectswho you are. If you aren’t authentic, people will see right throughit, and you will lose all credibility. This point was driven home to me in one of my negotiatingclasses. One of my students, a genuinely nice guy—about 5 feet, 7inches, tall, a little overweight, balding, and always with a smile—did not do well in the early negotiating exercises, so he decided totry a different approach. When he got to a critical juncture duringthe next exercise, he stood up and started yelling and pounding onthe table. Everyone, including his own teammates, had the samereaction: They all burst into laughter. His behavior just wasn’t“him,” and it certainly wasn’t effective. Jessica advises: Negotiate in a way that works for you. In my business and in my personal life, when I want something, I try to figure out a way to get it while still being fair to all parties involved. I trust my instincts and try to be myself. I try to incorporate my own per-
  42. 42. 20 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATING sonality into every negotiating situation. I am firm, but I try to be enthusiastic and friendly. For instance, getting angry has never worked well for me, but using my youth to my advantage seems to work with most people I meet for the first time, espe- cially if they are older. People see right through you if you try to be something you’renot. If you’re soft-spoken, you can be a soft-spoken negotiatorand still take tough positions. You can disagree politely butfirmly. You can provide your reasons for seeing things differently.You can offer alternatives. Although you can be flexible in howyou satisfy those interests, you must be able to disagree ratherthan just to give in to something contrary to your interests. Thisis what we call “quiet firm confidence”—which is very powerfulbecause when you do raise your voice, even just a little, peoplewill notice. They will know that you are serious. When I was graduating from law school and interviewing forjobs, the conventional wisdom was that, when they interviewed,women should wear skirts with matching jackets, typicallynavy blue, white blouses, and little floppy bow ties. This outfitresembled the suits men wore but failed to project the powerfulimage of the three-piece suit men favored at the time. The mes-sage being given to women was that they needed to be like men ifthey wanted to succeed. Author and former CNN executive GailEvans described this as “looking like a junior man.” For mostwomen, this attire didn’t produce the desired effect because itwasn’t authentic. In fact, it made them look silly. Today, womenrealize that they don’t have to dress like a man to be successfulin business and have jettisoned the “junior man” uniform in favorof dresses, tailored suits, pants or whatever outfits suit their per-sonality and the occasion. Jessica notes: As a young investment banker, I usually wore gray or black pantsuits when I visited clients and casual pants and blouses to
  43. 43. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 21 the office. This wardrobe made the right impression and looked good on me. When you look good, you feel confident. Every industry has different norms for what to wear. To get an idea of how you should dress, watch what the most successful women at your company wear at different times. Then try to emulate them, but choose the types of clothes that look good on you and that you are comfortable wearing. Although ultimatums, threats, screaming, stonewalling, tak-ing extreme positions, and other hardball tactics do not work formost women, that does not mean that women cannot be toughnegotiators. In fact, you can be even tougher than a man and getaway with it, if you do it in the right way. Acting the part of the“tough negotiator” is different from delivering a tough message.You can deliver that message firmly but in a way that you feelcomfortable with, or you can find other ways to have it delivered,such as having someone else deliver it for you. What you cannotdo is be something you’re not. Worse, negotiating like a man canconjure up the negative stereotype that, for lack of a better word,some of the women we interviewed referred to as the “bitch”stereotype. The reality is, women are held to a different standard thanmen. Susan Medalie, executive director of the Women’s Cam-paign Fund, first witnessed this double standard when shewas just starting out in government. She was working for anincredibly talented and able woman who was secretary of theU.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Wheneverthis woman expressed anger at her staff, even though it wasdeserved, some of the men were quick to label her a “bitch”behind her back. On the other hand, when her male predecessorhad engaged in similar behavior, it was excused because he wasconsidered a “go-getter.” This stereotype is doubly pernicious. When a woman comeson too strong, men see it as giving them license to disregard notonly the woman’s position but to disregard her as well. Moreover,
  44. 44. 22 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGsome women, to avoid being labeled a “bitch,” are cowed intogiving up too easily on getting what they want when in fact theycould get it if they merely held firm rather than giving in. Theproblem is usually not with the message but how it is delivered. Itis important to ask for what you want, but it is equally importantto ask in the right way. For example, men react negatively whena woman presents them with an ultimatum. Telling them quietlyand firmly, and as often as necessary, that you really need some-thing accomplishes the same objective without causing a negativereaction. As Jan Hopkins, former anchor for CNN’s Street Sweepobserves: You have to be careful about “demands.” You can’t come across as a “bitch.” It turns a lot of people off in a negotiating situation. Sometimes you get more by being charming. Although being loud, sarcastic, intimidating, or even justunnecessarily tough may not actually serve men well, other menwill often overlook, accept, or even forgive their behavior. Not sofor women. Women who engage in this type of behavior quicklyget labeled “bitch,” although rarely to their face, by the men withwhom they are negotiating. They also frequently fi nd themselvesmarginalized or taken out of a negotiation altogether becausemen don’t want to work with them. And because women oftenwork for men, the men they are negotiating with can go directlyto the boss. Not only can this hurt your ability to negotiate effec-tively but it can also damage your career. By using the principlesset forth in this book, you can be firm and not give in, withoutbeing labeled a “bitch.” Jean Hollands, CEO and president of the Growth and Leader-ship Center and the author of Same Game, Different Rules: Howto Get Ahead without Being a Bully Broad, Ice Queen or “Ms.Understood,” works with women who are about to derail theircareers because their companies consider them too aggressive.Some women come to her believing they can get what they wantif they “just bark loud enough, because they have seen it work for
  45. 45. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 23men.” But it doesn’t work for them. She advises women to softentheir approach by showing vulnerability, which she calls the“flip side of anger.” This allows them to press the logic of theirposition without risking being perceived as overly aggressive ordifficult. She says that women can be effective if they talk abouttheir feelings because “they are being authentic.” For example,rather than saying, “I deserved to go to the conference, but youstupidly chose Charlie instead,” a woman could say, “I was reallyhurt that you chose Charlie to go to the conference instead of me.I wanted to go. It would have helped me with the project I amworking on for the company.” Showing vulnerability is not the only effective approachWomen who are successful with an aggressive, competitivestyle succeed because it is natural for them. They are naturallycompetitive, they like to win, and they have learned how to do itwith grace and style. Humor can soften the impact of a competi-tive style and allow a woman to employ it effectively. As CarolynWall, former publisher of Newsweek, puts it, “They can do itbecause they do it with charm. Charm is their secret weapon.”Janice Reals Ellig, Co-CEO at the executive search firm of Chad-dick Ellig Inc. and the author of What Every Successful WomanKnows, suggests that one way for a woman to avoid being seenas too aggressive is “not to keep pushing” if you encounter strongresistance. Instead, she suggests “letting it go for a while and thencoming back to it.” Always negotiate in a way that is consistent with who you are.That doesn’t mean that you cannot change to make yourself a bet-ter negotiator or adjust your approach when you are negotiatingwith someone who has a different style. As Allison McGowen,formerly the chief operating officer for the Los Angeles Sparks ofthe WNBA, put it: “Be yourself, but remember you are playing apart.” Learn to recognize your strengths and weaknesses. Watchhow different types of people react to you. Ask people who haveseen you negotiate how they see your strengths and weaknesses.Self-awareness will help you play to your strengths and compen-
  46. 46. 24 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGsate for your weaknesses. It will also enable you to recognizewhen you lack the skills, style, or patience needed in a particularsituation so you can bring in someone else to handle all or partof the negotiating.IT DOESN’T HURT TO ASK: ALMOST EVERYTHINGIS NEGOTIABLEYou may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if youdon’t try. —B E VERLY S ILL SDavia Temin, president of Temin and Company. and former headof corporate marketing for General Electric Capital Services,remembers the exact moment she realized, “Almost everythingis negotiable, if you see it that way.” She was raised in a middle-class family in Ohio and was taught as a girl to “follow the rules.”She spent the early part of her life doing just that. When she gotout of business school, she accepted her first job as assistant tothe director of development at the Columbia Business Schoolwithout really negotiating. She saw the offer as a choice, nota negotiation: You either took the job or you did not. It nevercrossed her mind that she could negotiate the offer. While working at Columbia, however, she saw something thatchanged her view of the world. She had always assumed that whenyou applied to business school, you either got accepted or youdidn’t. If you didn’t, you went to another business school or wenton to do something else. That is what most people did. But a fewstudents who were rejected came in to see the dean of admissions.They said something to the effect that, “I know you rejected myapplication, but I really want to go to Columbia Business School.What can I do to change your mind?” To Davia’s amazement, thedean of admissions did not send them away but advised them toenroll in the School of General Studies and take four semestersof advanced calculus and statistics. “And if you get A’s in each ofthose courses,” she would say, “I’ll admit you.” A handful of stu-
  47. 47. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 25dents actually took her up on her offer and were admitted. Daviasuddenly realized, “Way more things were negotiable than I hadpreviously thought.” So she decided to learn how to negotiate. The biggest mistake women make is to not negotiate. LikeDavia, many women look at situations in terms of decisionsthey have to make, not opportunities to negotiate. They eitheraccept the offer or turn it down. There are many reasons whythis happens, but often women simply fail to realize that theycan question what is being offered and ask for something else.Successful women understand that almost everything is nego-tiable—although you do not want to negotiate everything. Theyknow how to pick their battles. But when they choose to acceptsomething without negotiating, it is a conscious decision. As Janice Lieberman, NBC’s Today Show consumer reporter,advises, “If you do not ask for what you want, you can’t get it.”She adds, “Ask privately and nicely. Be very clear about what youare asking for. And if you don’t get what you want, ‘push the upbutton’—go to someone higher up who has the power to helpyou.” For example, Lieberman suggests when you are seeking tobook a hotel room, after checking the price being offered on theInternet, call the local number at the hotel and ask to speak withthe manager. He or she “has the authority to make a deal andhas an interest in doing so.” If you can’t get a lower price, ask forfree parking, an upgrade, kids eat free, and /or a free extra night.If the day manager says no, call later and try the night manager.You might get a different result. Tory Johnson, CEO of Women for Hire and workplace con-tributor on ABC’s Good Morning America, states that as a smallbusiness owner, she always researches pricing and asks directlyabout what kind of deal a vendor can offer. Sometimes it’s adiscount to try the product or service. Other times it’s a lowerrate as a sign of appreciation for a long-standing customer. “I’mamazed,” she adds, “at how many people just don’t ask. Typicallyit’s because we assume the price or terms are firm. Other timesit’s because we don’t want to risk rejection. So we agree to what’s
  48. 48. 26 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGinitially presented to us without questioning it. But the reality isthere’s never been a time when someone has laughed at me orhung up on me or screamed at me simply because I had the gutsto ask for the best possible deal.” As president of her own public relations company and as aformer senior vice president at Prudential Securities, RonnaLichtenberg, author of It’s Not Business, It’s Personal: The NineRelationship Principles That Power Your Career, has negotiatedmajor deals involving hundreds of thousands of dollars. How-ever, the negotiation she is proudest of is having convinced asalesman at Neiman Marcus to sell her a pair of Manolo Blahnikshoes for $125. While on vacation in San Francisco, she came across a pairof the designer’s shoes in her size on sale at Neiman Marcus.She had the same pair in another color and loved them. Whileshe could easily afford them, she couldn’t justify spending $395,even on sale, for shoes she already had in another color. So shesaid to the salesman, “You know these are a size 7-AA. You arenot going to be able to sell them to anyone else. It is right beforeChristmas, and you are going to mark them down again rightafter New Year’s. So you can either take an imprint of my creditcard now and send them to me after you take that second mark-down, or I can walk out of here and you won’t get a commissionfor selling me a pair of shoes.” He walked away for a momentto think about her offer; then he came back and took her creditcard. Shortly after New Year’s, she received a package in the mailfrom Neiman Marcus—a pair of Manolo Blahniks for $125. Ronna negotiated this perfectly. She understood what moti-vated the salesman and was able to convince him that what shewas proposing was in his interest as well as hers. But that isnot why she told us about this transaction. She is proud of thisnegotiation because normally she would not even have thoughtof attempting it. Women often fail to consider the possibility of negotiating evenin circumstances when men routinely do. For instance, women,
  49. 49. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 27particularly young women, typically don’t negotiate when theyaccept a new job. They see the offer as a choice that they caneither accept or decline. Men, on the other hand, recognize thesesituations as opportunities to negotiate a significant increase intheir compensation. (See Chapter 9.) Although one major advantage women bring to the bargainingtable is their ability to develop relationships, this advantage toooften becomes a disadvantage when women fail to negotiate outof fear that doing so will damage their relationship with the otherperson. Never underestimate the power of asking. You may notalways get what you ask for, but if you ask in the right way, youwill rarely lose by trying. You will also be surprised at how oftenyou get all or at least some of what you ask for. Jessica notes: At times, when I am negotiating, I remember a quote from hockey great Wayne Gretzky that my dad put up on my door when I was 12: “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.” Throughout my childhood, my father constantly told me that I could do anything I wanted and be whatever I wanted to be if I had the courage to go after it. By the time I reached high school, that lesson had obviously taken hold. Without even thinking about it, I instinctively asked for what I wanted. For example, in eleventh grade, I got a history teacher to change my grade from a B to an A simply by asking. I had been more interested in my social life and in playing soccer than in studying that quarter, but I was not happy with the B. So I went to talk with the teacher who told me that I had just missed getting an A. Instead of accepting that answer, I asked him to give me the A and promised to work extra hard the next quarter. To my surprise, he said okay. Sometimes the very thing you are afraid to ask for is some-thing the people you are dealing with would welcome. LisaCaputo, former press secretary to First Lady Hillary Clinton andnow executive vice president of Global Marketing and CorporateAffairs at Citigroup and CEO of Citi’s Women & Co. business,
  50. 50. 28 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGlearned the importance of asking for what you want when she gotto the White House. Earlier in her career, she had often allowedothers to tell her what was going to happen. At the White House,she was put in a position where she had to negotiate with thepress on a daily basis. “The more I negotiated, the more confi-dence I had to ask. The more times I was met with a favorableresponse, the more I realized I should not be afraid to ask. Soonasking became a basic tenet of how I negotiated.” Shortly after she arrived at the White House, Lisa was able toput that insight to good use. She had barely had time to set up heroffice when television journalists began asking to interview theFirst Lady. Ultimately, the White House decided to give the firsttelevision interview to Katie Couric, who was then the co-hostof the NBC Today Show, which aired in the morning. But Lisawanted the first interview to be in evening prime time so it wouldreach the largest possible audience. She also wanted it to be anhour-long special. So she asked. NBC and Katie Couric were notonly open to the idea, they loved it. So the interview aired as anhour-long NBC news special in prime time, and it proved to bea great ratings success. Getting over the fear of asking is not enough. You also needto ask for more than you expect to get. As Carolyn Kepchar,founder of WorkHerWay.Com and one-time regular on the televi-sion show The Apprentice learned when negotiating with DonaldTrump as chief operating officer for Trump National Golf Club:“To be successful when you negotiate, you need to aim high.”That does not mean asking for something totally unrealistic. Anunrealistic proposal will damage your credibility and may evenresult in the other party’s terminating the discussion before itbegins in earnest. In Chapter 3, you will learn how to anchoryour offer—that is, how to determine the range of reasonablepossible outcomes to which the parties might agree and how tomake your initial offer in a way that not only favors your positionbut is also accepted by the other side as an appropriate startingpoint for the negotiations.
  51. 51. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 29 In general, even if you don’t get everything you ask for, themore you ask for, the more you’ll be given. If we know that, thenwhy do most women ask for too little? In psychologist PatriciaFarrell’s view: Women sometimes don’t realize that you don’t start where you want to end. They really believe that the other person will do the right thing by them. Primarily this is what happens in families. It may also have to do with a lack of confidence, or it may result from their greater sense of fairness. They may be afraid of look- ing foolish. Some women feel that asking for more, at least if it is for themselves, would be “greedy.” Whatever your reason for not asking, you can’t expect to getwhat you don’t ask for, and if you ask for too little, you can besure that’s what you will get. The negotiating process requires compromise. In most nego-tiations, there is an expectation that where you start is not whereyou will finish. Therefore, most people would feel foolish if theysimply gave you everything you asked for, no matter how reason-able your proposal. To feel good about the final agreement, mostindividuals require some give-and-take. If your initial offer iswhere you would actually like to end up, then you’ll either fail toreach an agreement or you’ll have to take less in the end. Other-wise, the other parties will not feel that they have been includedin the process. This does not mean that you should treat negoti-ating as a game in which you manipulate the other side. Rather,when you are doing your preparation, determine the best resultyou could possibly hope for; what you realistically think you canaccomplish; and your bottom line—the least you are willing toaccept. Then, using the tools in this book, seek the best possibleresult. Even if you don’t actually get everything you want, youwill end up better off than if you had set your sights lower. If carried out properly, there is something therapeutic aboutthe negotiating process. Even though both sides don’t get every-thing they want or, paradoxically perhaps, because they don’t geteverything they want, everyone walks away satisfied that they did
  52. 52. 30 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGthe best they could. When you ask for more than you expect andaccept that negotiating requires give-and-take, you allow roomfor the process to work. This, in turn, increases the likelihoodthat you will not only get the things most important to you butalso that both sides will feel that the end result is fair.NEGOTIATE FOR YOURSELF AS IF YOU WERENEGOTIATING FOR SOMEONE ELSEEveryone is valued in this world as he shows by his conduct thathe wishes to be valued. —J E AN D E L A B RUYÈREWhen Carol Raphael is negotiating on behalf of her organiza-tion, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, she always triesto get the best deal she can. On the other hand, she admitted inher interview for this book that she might have gotten a bettercompensation package for herself the last time her contract wasrenewed. Instead, she asked the board of directors for what shethought was fair, and they agreed to give it to her. Like many of the women we interviewed, Carol has a difficulttime negotiating for herself. But she doesn’t want to feel that sheis being taken advantage of, so she would have no problem seek-ing a raise if she felt she was being paid significantly less than herpeers at similar organizations. While we do not advocate pushingto get every last penny you could when you negotiate, there isnothing wrong with negotiating for yourself. As psychologist Patricia Farrell, Ph.D., notes, “Women find itmuch less difficult to negotiate on behalf of others. This placesthem in the role of caregiver, a role they feel very comfortablein.” When it comes to negotiating for themselves, according toDr. Farrell, women often feel “that they don’t deserve what theyare asking for.” Moreover, because women tend to view things inthe context of relationships, they take things personally. Askingfor things for themselves becomes more difficult because if theyare turned down, they see it as a personal rejection. Even women
  53. 53. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 31who are excellent negotiators may find it difficult to negotiatewell on their own behalf. Sometimes just recognizing that you have a tendency to putothers’ needs ahead of your own is enough to change your behav-ior. Randi Kahn, a managing director at Citigroup who negoti-ates multi-million-dollar real estate deals for a living, recognizesthat she has a hard time when it comes to negotiating for herself.Therefore, she compensates for it. She simply forces herself topush just as hard or harder when she is negotiating for herself. Asa result, she has been able to succeed in the very male dominatedworld of investment banking. Dr. Farrell suggests a way for women to overcome their reluc-tance to ask for things on their own behalf: “Take yourself outsideyourself. See yourself as negotiating for someone else. Ask your-self what you would do if you were advocating for someone else.”Before you begin, give yourself a little pep talk. Sit down and makea list of the reasons why you deserve what you are asking for. If, however, after trying to negotiate for yourself using thetechniques in this book, you still cannot do so with the sameforcefulness you would use on behalf of others, recognize thatand take a different approach. For example, bring in someoneelse to encourage and reassure you that what you are asking foris appropriate. Bonnie Stone, CEO of Women In Need, is an excellent nego-tiator when she is working on behalf of others. She recognizes,however, that she is not good at getting what she wants for her-self. Sometimes she “has” to have something. She understandsthat this violates one of the key rules for successful negotiating—“Be willing to walk away”—so when she has to negotiate forherself, she brings in other people to help her. For example, whenshe was looking to buy her first apartment in New York City, shefell in love with one particular apartment. She “had” to have it.Knowing herself, she asked her brother, who is an attorney, tohelp her negotiate the purchase. She wanted to offer the askingprice rather than risk losing the apartment. Her brother advised
  54. 54. 32 A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL NEGOTIATINGher not to offer that much. Although her fear of losing the apart-ment was almost intolerable, she listened to him and offered alower price. The next day the sellers called to accept her offer. Many young girls are taught that if people care about you,they will give you what you want without your asking. That maybe true for children, but as an adult, if you don’t ask for it, yougenerally don’t get it. Sharon Taylor, senior vice president ofhuman resources at Prudential Financial, Inc., put it this way:“Hard work is nice, but you will never get anywhere in life unlessyou ask for what you want and are willing to fight for it.” Mostpeople, even those who care about you, cannot read your mind.Let them know what you want. Our guess is that what you wantis not only reasonable but also probably much less than you couldactually get. Never be embarrassed to ask for what you want. Beas forceful an advocate for yourself as you would be if you werenegotiating for someone else.MASTER THE DETAILS, BUT BE FLEXIBLE AND NEVERLOSE SIGHT OF YOUR ULTIMATE GOALWhen one door closes, another opens. But we often look soregretfully upon the closed door that we don’t see the one thathas opened for us. —A LE X ANDER G R AHAM B ELLMost women are detail oriented. Erin Noonan, chief operatingofficer for Americas Sourcing at Barclays Capital, considers thisone of the “major strengths women bring to the table,” and it isoften one reason why successful women have been able to getto where they are. They make sure that they are better preparedthan the people with whom they are negotiating. Author andformer CNN executive Gail Evans attributes this to the “gameof knowledge” girls learn while growing up. In school, they arerewarded “with good grades, parental approval, [and] teacherattention for being a good student, for doing their homework,[and] for being prepared when called upon. They carry this train-
  55. 55. THE 10 MOST COMMON MISTAKES WOMEN MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 33ing into adulthood.” Dr. Patricia Farrell believes that women tendto overprepare because “they don’t want to look foolish. Theirsometimes-fragile sense of self is on the line. They don’t feelcomfortable working without a script.” Being better prepared than the people you are dealing withcan give you a huge advantage. Preparation often enables womento get the respect they need to negotiate on a level playing fieldwith men. When Erin Noonan was vice president of strategicsourcing at Prudential Financial and was involved in negotiat-ing to buy and sell aircraft, initially she had some difficulty withthe men she was negotiating with because they were not used todealing with women. She was able to establish her credibility by“reading everything and knowing everything about the contractsshe was negotiating and the underlying facts.” Men are much lessforgiving of women who make mistakes with the facts than theyare with men under similar circumstances. Moreover, the betterprepared you are, the more convincing you will be. On the other hand, women sometimes get so caught up in thedetails that they lose sight of what they are trying to achieve.When you are trying to persuade people to your point of view, itis important to focus on the details that are important to them.Edit your points. Just because you know something doesn’t meaneveryone needs to know it. If you share too much information,you lose your audience. Moreover, there is no need to argueover an issue just because you are more knowledgeable thansomeone else, especially if it doesn’t move things along in theright direction. Even if the other side is incorrect, you need dealwith the issue only if it makes a difference. Otherwise, you runthe risk of alienating that person for no reason. Sharon Taylor,senior vice president of human resources at Prudential Financialadvises: “Have all your facts, but focus on the three or four mostimportant things.” And always keep your ultimate goal in mind:to reach an agreement that satisfies your needs. Avoid gettingso mired in the details that you risk losing the deal because youcan’t step back and see the big picture.

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