Research Workshop Presentation

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Research Workshop Presentation

  1. 1. Welcome to the Planning Division’s Research Resources Workshop
  2. 2. Research Resources WorkshopIntroduction to Data SourcesFormats, Products, Getting StartedDoing Research with GISPutting Research to Work in ScenariosQuestion and Answer Session
  3. 3. SESSION 1INTRODUCTION TO DATA SOURCES by Luis Nieves-Ruiz
  4. 4. Introduction to Data SourcesTypes of DataData Release ScheduleExamples of Data SourcesWhen to Use your Data
  5. 5. Introduction to Data SourcesTypes of Data  Primary  Secondary  Tertiary
  6. 6. Introduction to Data SourcesData Release Schedule  Annual  Other  Projections
  7. 7. Introduction to Data SourcesExamples of Data Sources  Demographic  Economic  Land Use/Spatial  Other
  8. 8. Introduction to Data SourcesExamples of Data Sources  Demographic Economic Land Use/Spatial Other
  9. 9. Introduction to Data SourcesU.S Census Bureau/American Community Surveyhttp://factfinder.census.gov/home/saff/main.html ?_lang=en Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) Your Logo
  10. 10. Introduction to Data SourcesExamples of Data Sources  Economic Land Use/Spatial Other
  11. 11. Introduction to Data SourcesNorth American Industry Classification System (NAICS)  Several digit levels of complexity NAICS 11 Agriculture NAICS 112 Animal Production NAICS 1121 Cattle Ranching
  12. 12. Introduction to Data SourcesInfo USAhttp://ocgis2.ocfl.net/imf/imf.jsp?site=ocflCounty Business Patternshttp://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/index.htmlFREDhttp://fred.labormarketinfo.com/default.asp Your Logo
  13. 13. Introduction to Data SourcesExamples of Data Sources Demographic Economic  Land Use/Spatial Other
  14. 14. Introduction to Data Sources  Department of Revenue Codes CODE DESCRIPTION CONTAINER NURSERY - ABOVE GROUND OPEN, SHADED OR 6930 GREENHOUSE ORNAMENTAL LANDSCAPE 6900 PLANTS / TREES MIXED CONTAINER AND FIELD 6940 NURSERY FIELD NURSERY - IN GROUND 6910 OPEN FIELD OR SHADED Your Logo
  15. 15. Introduction to Data Sources •Committed Land Use Inventory PDNAME TOTRESUNIT SFUNITS MFUNITS THUNITS TOTNONRESF COMMSF OFFICESF INDSF HMTSUNITSFoothills of Mt. Dora PD 640 640 0 0 130744 130744 0 0 0 Colonial Sunflower 575 190 385 0 135634 135634 0 0 0 WindsorServices Office Park Building 0 0 0 0 2880 0 2880 0 0 Robert Allen Commercial 0 0 0 0 16800 16800 0 0 0 Your Logo
  16. 16. Introduction to Data SourcesExamples of Data Sources Demographic Economic Land Use/Spatial  Other
  17. 17. Introduction to Data SourcesWoods and PooleNielsen Claritas Your Logo
  18. 18. map%6n1 3Cmapr0ull%3Cmapr Introduction to Data Sources Nielsen Claritas  Draw your own polygon  Ten cents per point/information  Used by market consultants Your Logo
  19. 19. Introduction to Data SourcesData use depends on the following:  Question  MethodologyNot all data is suitable for all projects Your Logo
  20. 20. Introduction to Data Sources Q: How Many people live within the RSA?  Methodology  GIS Analysis  Quantitative Techniques  Data Sources Used  U-Code Layers  U.S Decennial Census  BEBR 2009 Population Estimate Your Logo
  21. 21. Introduction to Data SourcesQ: Is there enough Industrial Land to meet 2030 demand?  Methodology  Quantitative Analysis  GIS  Data Sources Used  Info USA  Woods and Poole  DOR Codes  Committed Land Use Inventory Your Logo
  22. 22. Introduction to Data Sources P: Study Food Production in Orange County  Methodology  GIS Analysis  Literature Review  Database Review  Data Sources Used  USDA Agricultural Census  DOR Codes  Info USA database Your Logo
  23. 23. SESSION 2FORMATS, PRODUCTS, AND GETTING STARTED by Janna Souvorova
  24. 24. Formats, Products, Getting Started  Creativity and Inspiration for Project Design  Types of Products and Outputs  Project Management Process  Project Maintenance
  25. 25. Formats, Products, Getting Started  Creativity and Inspiration for Project Design Types of Products and Outputs Project Management Process Project Maintenance
  26. 26. Formats, Products, Getting StartedCreativity and Inspiration for Project Design The 6 myths of creativity: 1. Creativity comes from creating types  You want everyone in your organization producing novel and useful ideas 2. Money is a creativity motivation  It is critical to match people to projects where their interest lie 3. Time pressure fuels creativity  Creativity requires an incubation period: let the ideas bubble up 4. Fear forces breakthroughs  People are more likely to have a breakthrough if they are happy 5. Competition beats collaboration  The most creative teams have the confidence to share and debate ideas 6. A streamlined organization is a creative organization
  27. 27. Formats, Products, Getting StartedCreativity and Inspiration for Project Design Effective kick-off and brainstorming sessions: 1. An army of one  Group brainstorming really does not work that well.  Being in a group creates a set of distractions that is difficult to overcome: competition, desire to look good, social inhibitions.  However, it is an important exercise in team-building: 1) alternate individual brainstorming with group sessions; 2) ―brainwriting‖ 2. Asking the right questions  It is important to define the problem right.  The goal should be quantity of ideas, not quality. 3. Bad ideas  When brainstorming, you should be generating, not evaluating ideas.
  28. 28. Formats, Products, Getting Started Creativity and Inspiration for Project Design  Types of Products and Outputs Project Management Process Project Maintenance
  29. 29. Formats, Products, Getting StartedTypes of Products and Outputs1. Written documents2. GIS products3. Outreach materials4. Online content
  30. 30. Formats, Products, Getting StartedTypes of Products and Outputs1. Written documents 3. Outreach materials  Report  Boards  White Paper  Presentation materials  Summary  Brochures & handouts  Policy recommendation(s)  Minutes/transcripts from  Issue Brief an outreach campaign  Issue(s) Series  PowerPoint presentation2. GIS products 4 Online content  Maps  Web page(s)  Data layers  Online information  Technical memorandum storage (ftp sites) - data sources; - assumptions; - methodology; - results
  31. 31. Formats, Products, Getting Started Creativity and Inspiration for Project Design Types of Products and Outputs  Project Management Process Project Maintenance
  32. 32. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Your responsibilities as a project manager: 1. Establishing a project schedule 2. Defining the scope of the project 3. Proving periodic briefing to management staff 4. Serving as a resource to team members 5. Keeping the project focused and on schedule 6. Ensuring quality control and quality assurance
  33. 33. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 1. Identify a project goal 2. Define the scope, approach, limiting constraints 3. Establish a project schedule 4. List available resources that may be used for background and information 5. Develop an outreach plan (if applicable) 6. Compile the project team 7. Schedule the project kick-off meeting 8. Develop a monitoring and reporting system 9. Ensure implementation and follow-up
  34. 34. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 1. Identify a project goal  What is the purpose of the project, study, process, or paper?  Why is it necessary, or being done? 2. Define the scope, approach and limiting constraints  Scope – describes the work required  Approach – describes the manner in which you will achieve the scope  Constraints – time, costs, support and resources
  35. 35. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 3. Establish a project schedule  Provide specific due dates for delivery of products and services and describe the tasks  Include data collection time  Include outreach activities and important meetings (if applicable)  Include project hearing and approval dates (if applicable)  Build in time for review of draft products
  36. 36. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 4. List available resources that may be used for background and information  Economic/demographic and spatial data sources  Technology (prof. software, GIS, keypads, etc.)  Other Department and Divisions  Policies/Codes/Plans  Previous studies and reports  Professional organizations and their publications  Communication Division (if any outreach is planned)
  37. 37. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 5. Develop an outreach plan (if applicable)  Create a list of stakeholders  Identify the issue, the message, the target audience, and the tools used to distribute the information  Develop an outreach schedule  Design a website component with materials for posting and schedule frequent updates
  38. 38. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 6. Compile the project team  Balance your team  Define roles and expectations  Match the team members’ interests to tasks  Maintain organization and ensure that one key person is responsible for each major task  Always acknowledge and give credit for contribution
  39. 39. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Management Process Steps in managing a project: 7. Schedule the project kick-off meeting  Prepare an agenda and a draft outline  Establish a regular meeting time and place  Ensure that you are gathering the team’s feedback and making necessary adjustments 8. Develop a monitoring and reporting system  Keep the project on schedule, provide updates 9. Ensure implementation and follow-up
  40. 40. Formats, Products, Getting Started Creativity and Inspiration for Project Design Types of Products and Outputs Project Management Process  Project Maintenance
  41. 41. Formats, Products, Getting StartedProject Maintenance  Project evaluation  measurement mechanism  evaluation schedule  Project implementation  implementation schedule  major milestones  Project update  monthly/annual/bi-annual/as-needed  Web site maintenance  maintenance schedule  person responsible  Data storage
  42. 42. SESSION 3DOING RESEARCH WITH GIS by Manan Pathak
  43. 43. Doing Research With GISUnderstanding GIS and ExtensionsSpatial AnalystCommunityVizGetting Started Source: latlabrafael.wordpress.com
  44. 44. Doing Research with GIS GIS – Geographic Information System Set of computer tools that for working with data that are tied to a particular location on the earth Three components: Arc Map - Arc Catalog - Arc Toolbox Helps planning, public works, engineering, and government professionals with decision-making Comprehensive Planning as an Example Policy decisions on long-range changes to a community’s physical environment and citizen participation Socioeconomic and commercial demographics combined to facilitate analysis and provide insights for community building
  45. 45. Doing Research with GISArcGIS Extensions 3D Analyst – Provides powerful and advanced visualization analysis Spatial Analyst – Broad range of powerful spatial analysis tools Network Analyst – Network based spatial analysis (routing, directions) Schematics – Schematic representation of ArcGIS Geodatabase Geostatistical Analyst – Spatial data exploration using statistical methods Survey Analyst – Suite of survey measurement-based analysis Tracking Analyst – Sophisticated analysis of time-related dataCounty Layers http://ocgis2.ocfl.net/imf/imf.jsp?site=ocfl
  46. 46. Doing Research with GIS Query  Queries extract features or records from a data table and isolate for further use, such as printing, calculating statistics, editing, graphing, or doing more queries.  Two main categories: Attribute and Spatial
  47. 47. Doing Research with GISSpatial Analyst Spatial Analyst provides a broad range of powerful spatial modeling and analysis tools. You can create, query, map and analyze cell –based raster data, perform integrated raster-vector analysis, derive new information from existing data, and query information across multiple data layers.
  48. 48. Doing Research with GISCommunityViz Planning software that runs on a GIS platform  Scenario 360 and Scenario 3D Scenario 360 and Site Builder 3D toolbar 360 Analysis 360 Set up 48
  49. 49. Doing Research with GISScenario 360 Create and experiment with hypothetical scenarios Assess economic, environmental, social, and visual considerations Make and change assumptions ―on the fly‖ View impacts of proposed changes Create 3D visualizations of scenarios
  50. 50. Doing Research with GISDoing Research with GISScenario 3D Creates beautifully realistic, interactive, sharable 3D scenes. Google SketchUp models can be imported to create context-related visualizations
  51. 51. Doing Research with GISNorthgate Redevelopment Case Study using CommunityViz Created new building points at the centroids of the existing building footprints: Base Scenario: land uses and square footage from the PA website Wellness Village Scenario: square footage, density and other development parameters assigned based on a proposed development program Ran the Common Impacts Wizard to compare the Base Scenario and the Wellness Village Scenario
  52. 52. Doing Research with GIS Getting Started on a GIS Project – http://www.esri.com  Decide on a general topic of interest and research question  Select the tool or model to use  Determine the data needed for the project  Write the proposal according to established guidelines Sources for free training (Virtual Campus) and recommended trainingshttp://training.esri.com/gateway/index.cfm?fa=catalog.gateway County staff that can helphttp://www.orangecountyfl.net/cms/DEPT/growth/fiscal/gis.htm
  53. 53. SESSION 4PUTTING RESEARCH TO WORK IN SCENARIOS by Alissa Barber Torres
  54. 54. Putting Research to WorkScenario PlanningTrend AnalysisUsing IndicatorsPutting It All Together
  55. 55. Putting Research to Work Scenario Planning To make sense of all this….. housing foreclosures hunger H1N1 virus recession unemployment budget deficits climate change homelessness commercial foreclosureswater supply fossil fuels Your Logo
  56. 56. Putting Research to WorkWhy do scenario planning?  Organize staff knowledge and insights  Gather the public’s feedback  Use possible outcomes as a learning tool  Form plans of action  Meet the needs of agencies/funders (FHWA)  Practice within planning profession  Deal with the problem of too much information Your Logo
  57. 57. Putting Research to WorkScenarios are  ―plausible, but structurally different futures‖ (Heijden 1996)  stories that use consistent interpretations of possible future events (Avin 2007)  Not as linear as forecasts  Not valid without logic or cause for existence  Not inherently good or bad (no ―straw men‖ allowed—Avin 2007) Your Logo
  58. 58. Putting Research to WorkScenario planning and ―The Art of the Long View‖ (Schwartz)  List driving forces (variables, trends, events)  Make a scenario grid (based on trends)  Imagine possible futures (stories from your grid)  Brainstorm implications and actions  Track indicators (shows when scenario is now reality) Your Logo
  59. 59. Putting Research to Work Scenario planning and ―The Art of the Long View‖ (Schwartz)Graphic from ―Your Future in 5 Easy Steps: Wired Guide to Personal Scenario Planning‖ (Wired Magazine) Your Logo
  60. 60. Putting Research to WorkSchwartz’ advice on scenario planning  Include ―outsiders‖  Look far ahead  Start with both the present and the past  Do preliminary work in smaller groups  Hold workshops and discussion groups  Live in a ―permanent strategic conversation‖ Your Logo
  61. 61. Putting Research to WorkAvin’s advice on scenario planning  Don’t assume past patterns will make a ―baseline‖ (trends/markets change over time)  Clarify problems before goals and objectives  Limit ―megatrends‖, unless directly applicable  Limit total scenarios to 3 to 5 that are clearly different (and brand using titles)  Use task forces and public forums  Get leadership support Your Logo
  62. 62. Putting Research to Work Trend Analysis Collecting everything you need to know… when you need to know it… then fitting it all together. Your Logo
  63. 63. Putting Research to WorkTrend Analysis—Data Sources  Email newsletters or RSS feeds  OPPAGA  Florida Trend  John Burns Real Estate  Planetizen  Urban Land Institute (ULI)  Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)  Others? Your Logo
  64. 64. Putting Research to WorkTrend Analysis  Google Reader  Organize your RSS feeds  Blogs and Twitter  Other RSS options…now in Safari and Firefox, Microsoft Outlook 2007  Google Alerts  Receive emails with links to resources  Customize keywords and number of alerts  Daily or weekly email Your Logo
  65. 65. Putting Research to Work Indicators how we know what we think we know about scenarios and their stories Your Logo
  66. 66. Putting Research to WorkDeveloping and tracking indicators  Can have several uses  May be used as evaluation criteria to compare scenarios  May be used as monitoring criteria to determine ―arrival‖ of a scenario  Can carry forward key points from process of scenario development Your Logo
  67. 67. Putting Research to WorkDeveloping and tracking indicators  Set benchmarks for measurement  Obtain public input to the extent possible  Survey established indicators in environment for potential use (ex. HCI, myregion.org)  Monitor news, data releases, other sources  Evaluate developments quarterly Your Logo
  68. 68. Putting Research to Work Putting It All Together Examples of scenario-based research Your Logo
  69. 69. Putting Research to WorkPutting It All Together  Issue Briefs  Summaries  White Papers  Series—HOK Landscapes—the Futurity Series http://campaign-archive.com/?u=4c3469dd28c20d086ef782e8b&id=ea2dba5f07&e=9fb2884b26 Your Logo
  70. 70. Putting Research to WorkHOK’s Futurity Trends…Do you agree?  Social change from Millennials*  Increasingly urban planet  Alternative energy  Climate change and sustainability *Issue Brief at http://www.hok.com/Planning/pdf/Landscapes_June_2009/Social%20Change.pdf Your Logo
  71. 71. Putting Research to WorkHOK’s Futurity Trends…Do you agree?  Water and food supply shortages  Science and technology advances  New frontiers (life on the moon…)  Mega multi-national corporate growth Your Logo
  72. 72. Putting Research to WorkPutting It All Together myregion.org■ Seven-county Central Florida region■ Data collection for several reports■ Values Study■ Social Capital Survey■ Several others (very useful for references and indicators…)■ Central Florida Regional Indicators report Your Logo
  73. 73. Putting Research to WorkPutting It All Together myregion.org■ How Shall We Grow? Regional Visioning■ Public participation process■ Four land use scenarios■ Public voting online/Bright House■ Selection of ―4C’s‖ scenario Your Logo
  74. 74. QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION
  75. 75. Thank youfor participating in the Planning Division’s Research Resources Workshop.

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