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  • 1. Routed Access in the Campus Network C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 1
  • 2. Cisco’s Technology Vision: The Intelligent Information Network Integrated Applications Network-Enabled Applications Get More Value Network Intelligence Integrated from Applications Services Phase 3 Virtualized Resources and Get More Value Services from Infrastructure Integrated Phase 2 and Resources Transport The Intelligent Movement of Data/Voice/Video across a System of Networks Get More Value from the Network Phase 1 Foundation Time C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 2
  • 3. The Market “Resources are tight. A complex network infrastructure will only further drain those resources. To prepare, strive for simplicity and uniformity.” CIO Magazine “... a collaboration analyst at Forrester, concurs. “It’s undeniable that electronic communication and collaboration between companies is increasing,…” CIO Magazine C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 3
  • 4. Challenges • Real-time applications are driving network needs VoIP, IP Video, Converged networks, CRM and Instant Messaging • Network recovery and downtime are critical Downtime is expensive Five and Six 9s reliability • Network complexity delays services integration • IT responsible for driving business process CRM, Mobility and Access to Data C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 4
  • 5. Network Have Been Built for Client-Server Applications Core • Hierarchical Decreasing Intelligence traffic: desktop Si Si to server • Non real-time Distribution • Centralized Si Si Si Si • Data only • Rule of 90–10 Access Valuable Services are Closer to the Servers C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 5
  • 6. What Is High Availability? Availability DPM Downtime Per Year (24x365) 99.000% 10000 3 Days 15 Hours 36 Minutes 99.500% 5000 1 Day 19 Hours 48 Minutes 99.900% 1000 8 Hours 46 Minutes 99.950% 500 4 Hours 23 Minutes 99.990% 100 53 Minutes 99.999% 10 5 Minutes “High 1 Availability” 99.9999% 30 Seconds DPM—Defects per Million C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 6
  • 7. What If You Could… Reduce Cost Through Diminished Risk of Downtime • Costs for downtime are high Revenue/ Industry Sector Revenue/Hour Employee- One day cost of lost productivity = Hour $1,644 per employee Energy $2,817,846 $ 569 100 person office = $164K per day Telecommunications $2,066,245 $ 186 • More than just a data Manufacturing $1,610,654 $ 134 network outage Financial Institution $1,495,134 $1,079 • More than just revenue impacted Insurance $1,202,444 $ 370 Revenue loss Retail $1,107,274 $ 244 Productivity loss Impaired financial performance Transportation $ 668,586 $ 107 Damaged reputation Average $1,010,536 $ 205 Recovery expenses Source: Meta Group C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7
  • 8. Routed Access in the Campus • Routing in the campus access layer • Utilizes EIGRP/OSPF for routing services • Spanning Tree Protocol is not used • Provides Si Si Increased resiliency for VoIP and Maximize your existing redundant connections Less configuration complexity Layer 3 Common troubleshooting tools Si Layer 2 Si C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8
  • 9. Multilayer Network Design Without a Rock Solid Foundation the Rest Doesn’t Matter Access • Offers hierarchy―each layer has specific role • Modular topology―building blocks Distribution • Easy to grow, understand, and Si Si troubleshoot • Creates small fault domains― Clear demarcations and isolation Core • Promotes load balancing and redundancy Si Si • Promotes deterministic traffic patterns • Incorporates balance of both Layer 2 Distribution and Layer 3 technology, leveraging the strength of both Si Si • Utilizes Layer 3 Routing for load balancing, fast convergence, scalability, Access and control Data Center C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 9
  • 10. Routed Campus Access Layer • VLANs are isolated to Wiring Closet • Stub routing in Access, no STP or HSRP/VRRP • Faster convergence and better load balancing • Topology could be the same… or… Distribution Layer 3 Stub Access Routing Layer 3 Subnets 3 4 6 7 8 9 C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 10
  • 11. Routed Access Design Structured Design Foundation • EIGRP or OSPF routed links between access and distribution • Routed interfaces, not VLAN trunks, between switches • Equal cost multi path to load balance traffic across network • Route summarization at distribution (like L2/L3) • Single control plane to configure/manage (no STP or HSRP) EIGRP or OSPF Si Si Equal Cost Multi Distribution Path Layer 3 Si Layer 2 Si Access 10.1.20.0 VLAN 20 Data 10.1.40.0 VLAN 40 Data 10.1.120.0 VLAN 120 Voice 10.1.140.0 VLAN 140 Voice C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 11
  • 12. Keep Redundancy Simple “If Some Redundancy is Good, More Redundancy is NOT Better” • Root Placement? • How Many Blocked Links? • Convergence? • Complex Fault Resolution C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 12
  • 13. Ease of Implementation Less to Get Right • No STP feature placement core to distribution LoopGuard RootGuard STP Root • No default gateway redundancy setup/tuning • No matching of STP/HSRP/GLBP priority • No L2/L3 multicast topology inconsistencies C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 13
  • 14. Ease of Troubleshooting • Routing Troubleshooting Tools Show ip route Traceroute Ping and extended pings Extensive protocol debugs Consistent troubleshooting; access, dist, core • Bridging Troubleshooting Tools Show ARP Show spanning-tree, standby, etc… Multiple show CAM dynamic’s to find a host • Failure Differences Routed topologies fail closed—i.e. neighbor loss Layer 2 topologies fail open—i.e. broadcast and unknowns flooded C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
  • 15. Advantages of Routed Access In the Right Environment • EIGRP and OSPF converge in <200 msec • OSPF convergence times dependent on timer tuning • RPVST+ convergence times dependent on GLBP/HSRP tuning 2 1.8 1.6 Upstream 1.4 Downstream Seconds 1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 RPVST+ OSPF EIGRP C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
  • 16. Multicast Routed Access Campus Design Things You Don’t Have to Do… • Tune PIM query interval for designated router convergence • Configure designated router to match HSRP primary • Configure PIM snooping on L2 switches between L3 switches • Worry about all those L2/L3 flow inconsistency issues C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
  • 17. Routed Access Considerations • Do you have any Layer 2 VLAN adjacency requirements between access switches? • IP addressing—do you have enough address space and the allocation plan to support a routed access design? • Platform requirements Catalyst 6500 requires an MSFC with hybrid (CatOS and Cisco IOS®) in the access to get all the necessary switch port and routing features Catalyst 4500 requires a SUP4 or higher for EIGRP or OSPF C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
  • 18. Why Routed Access Campus Design? Si Si Distribution Layer 3 Access Si Layer 2 Si • Most Enterprise Catalysts® support L3 switching today • EIGRP/OSPF routing preference over spanning tree • Single control plane and well known tool set Traceroute, show ip route, sho ip eigrp neighbor, etc… • IGP enhancements; stub router/area, fast reroute, etc.. • It is another design option available to you C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 18
  • 19. Hierarchical Campus Design Routed Access Building Blocks •• Network trust boundary Network trust boundary •• VLANs are contained to the access switch VLANs are contained to the access switch Access •• Use EIGRP or OSPF on interfaces to Use EIGRP or OSPF on interfaces to distribution layer distribution layer •• Use parallel paths for Equal Cost Multi Path (ECMP) Use parallel paths for Equal Cost Multi Path (ECMP) routing routing •• Use EIGRP stub routers or OSPF stub areas to limit Use EIGRP stub routers or OSPF stub areas to limit Distribution scope of convergence events scope of convergence events Si Si •• Access layer aggregation Access layer aggregation •• Route summarization to the core to minimize Route summarization to the core to minimize routing events routing events Core •• Route filtering from the core to minimize routing Route filtering from the core to minimize routing Si Si table size in access table size in access •• OSPF stub area border (ABR) OSPF stub area border (ABR) •• Keep your redundancy simple; equal cost Keep your redundancy simple; equal cost load balancing between access and core load balancing between access and core Distribution •• Vary CEF algorithm to prevent polarization Vary CEF algorithm to prevent polarization Si Si •• Highly available and fast—always on Highly available and fast—always on •• Deploy QoS end-to-end: protect the good and Deploy QoS end-to-end: protect the good and Access punish the bad punish the bad •• Equal cost core links provide for best convergence Equal cost core links provide for best convergence Data Center C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 19
  • 20. Who Can Benefit Enterprise Customers Who Are • Implementing VoIP, IP video or collaboration applications • Looking to improve network availability • Wanting to decrease network complexity • Standardizing on one set of protocols for the network • Easing the growing burden of network configuration and maintenance • Implementing CRM or databases company wide • Increasing intelligence into the wiring closet C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 20
  • 21. Water Agency Improves Network Availability San Antonio Water Systems • Customer Challenges Alleviate bandwidth constraints at network edge Improve network availability and database application performance Maintain operation costs • Solution Routed Access solution with Layer 3 “Routed Access routing capability in the wiring closet eases our management • Net Multiplier Effect burden and makes Halves network complexity and it much easier to reduces network management burden implement new Reduces new service implementation projects.” costs by 25%–30% Darrin Gannaway, Doubles bandwidth, eliminates congestion Senior Network Engineer and improves security with minimal capital outlay C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 21
  • 22. Investment Protection • Maximize equipment you have today • Supported in Catalyst wiring closet switches for Enterprise Catalyst 3560 and 3750 Catalyst 4500 Catalyst 6500 • EIGRP stub included in Catalyst base image • Existing protocols and management interfaces C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 22
  • 23. Supporting Solution Routed Access in the Catalyst Switching Portfolio Features, Scalability, Longevity e tion/Cor Distribu Catalyst 6500 Catalyst 4500 Access Datacenter Catalyst 6500 Routed Access Catalyst Routed 4948 Routed Access Routed Access Blade Switches Access loset Wiring C Catalyst 6500 Catalyst 4500 Catalyst 3750 Catalyst 3560 Catalyst 29xx Catalyst Express 500 Small Medium-sized Large Number of Employees/Density C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 23
  • 24. Cisco Catalyst Switching Enhanced Performance and Service Enablement Deterministic Predictable Business Integrated Application Simplified Continuity Security Performance Operations • Real-time recovery • Perimeter defense • Layer 2/3/4 traffic • Real-time classification troubleshooting • High-availability at • Identity-based (QoS) and traffic the network trust and identify monitoring equipment level management • Multicast for new applications • Configuration • High-availability at • Pervasive security automation the network design connectivity • Hardware-based level services wire-speed • Standardization performance on fewer protocols • Resiliency at the • Secure network protocol management • Intelligent power level management C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 24
  • 25. Cisco Is Your Partner for Delivering Intelligent Networks • More than 1600 support engineers, 40 percent with CCIE® certification • Average 15 years’ experience • 80 percent issues resolved online • Highest level of customer satisfaction • Multiple awards for service • 30,000 Technical Assistance Center(TAC) cases per month • 5000+ partners worldwide deliver direct and subcontracted services for Cisco technology • 1200+ partner-employed CCIEs C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 25
  • 26. Routed Access Summary • Real-time applications are driving network needs VoIP, Video, Triple play networks, CRM and IM • Network recovery and downtime are critical Downtime is expensive Five and Six 9s reliability • Routing in the wiring closet delivers Decreased downtime Predictable recovery from failure “Less to get right” Fewer protocols to troubleshoot C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 26
  • 27. C97-340375-00 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 27