Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power <ul><li>Presented by: </li></ul><ul><li>LOUIE A. MEDINACEL...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power In an arena where Philippine civil society has shown treme...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power For example, Transparency and Accountability Network (TAN)...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power However, Quimson (2004) discerned that the country present...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: Ju...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: Ho...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: Th...
Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: It...
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Civil society and public administration

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Civil society and public administration

  1. 1. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power <ul><li>Presented by: </li></ul><ul><li>LOUIE A. MEDINACELI </li></ul>
  2. 2. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power In an arena where Philippine civil society has shown tremendous influence, policy advocacy for more accountability in governance have yet to be fully embraced by most civil society groups in general. Asides from the vital role of Procurement Watch, Inc. (PWI) in the enactment of law on procurement reform, most of the legislative measures that societal actors have remained dormant in the country’s legislative mill.
  3. 3. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power For example, Transparency and Accountability Network (TAN) has formulated various bills that would seek to comprehensively restructure and overhaul the country’s internal revenue collection agency for they believe that it is futile to continue to reform an institution whose corruption has “metastasized”. In addition, they have also been at the forefront to lobby for a law that specifically provides for freedom of access to information in order to encourage greater transparency and eliminate possible obstacles to the disclosure of government actions and decisions.
  4. 4. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power However, Quimson (2004) discerned that the country presently has a crucial gap in its accountability regime. There are no laws that protect whistleblowers which have far reaching repercussions for societal watchdogs. If there is no protection afforded by the state to brave individuals or groups that are willing to divulge and expose official misconduct, it would compromise a mechanism of accountability given the absence or lack of reliable and genuine information backed by concrete evidence.
  5. 5. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: Just like the 1986 People Power Revolt, civil society came to the fore and undeniably was one of the major forces that led to the ouster of an unaccountable and corrupt leader. As a stakeholder, civil society was to a great extent responsible for determining the composition of the new political dispensation. Considerably, some leaders of civil society were appointed to significant positions in the new administration. Some formations within the anti-Estrada movement even transformed themselves into parties that successfully won congressional elections.
  6. 6. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: However, much of the mainstream members of Philippine civil society chose to maintain their distance, remain outside of the formal ambit of the state, and went back to their normal work and respective advocacies. If there was one crucial lesson that civil society learned from the experience, it is the undeniable fact that the country’s accountability regime could be easily subjected to manipulation and abuse.
  7. 7. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: Thus, its reform became one of the most important components of the post-Estrada governance agenda. This imperative also found its way in the reform package promised by the successor government of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. The consensus formed by both the state and civil society became a strong impetus for mutual collaboration as both realized that a partnership is needed if the goal of eradicating corruption and increasing transparency and accountability in governance is to be
  8. 8. Civil Society’s Power to Bargain, Negotiate and Influence Power Civil Society’s Participation in Accountability Reform: It must be noted that the Philippines had a strong tradition of civil society involvement as far as policy or governance issues are concerned (Magadia 2003; Patiño 2005). Given the context that political spaces for civil society engagements both at the national and local level are ostensibly provided in policy frameworks and legal instruments, embarking on an accountability advocacy would relatively not be that cumbersome.
  9. 9. Thank you.
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