Descubriendo HTML5 con Adobe Dreamweaver
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Descubriendo HTML5 con Adobe Dreamweaver

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Las novedades de la nueva versión de Adobe Dreamweaver CS5.5 y su ventaja multipantalla.

Las novedades de la nueva versión de Adobe Dreamweaver CS5.5 y su ventaja multipantalla.

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  • So, to help designers capitalize on the changing landscape, Adobe is making CS5 even better.Adobe is committed to enabling our customers to not only keep up with market trends, but to keep ahead of them and capitalize on them. This means that we need to innovate quickly so that we can provide the tools our customers need, when they need them. In this case, by enabling designers to create content for the multitude of new devices coming to market, and making production easier on the design and interactivity side, Adobe helps our customers take full advantage of the changes in the marketplace.To support this pace, we will be changing our release schedule so that we can keep customers ahead of these trends. Whereas in the past we had an 18-month Creative Suite release schedule, we will now be moving to a schedule of milestone releases every two years, but with targeted releases in between that deliver the technology our customers need to keep ahead in the areas where technology is shifting. This new release schedule starts now with the release of CS5.5, announcing on April 11, 2011.Our goal with this release is to enable designers to participate in creating content for the latest devices. So we’re not updating every application, we’re targeting specific features and workflows in the point products that are used to author content for tablets and smart phones. For Design Suite customers, feature updates will be added to InDesign, Dreamweaver, Flash Professional and Flash Catalyst. We’ll also take this opportunity to add Acrobat X Pro (the latest version of Acrobat introduced in late 2010) to both Design Standard and Design Premium. And as mentioned earlier, we are also announcing a new Subscription Edition that makes the latest Creative Suite features available without up-front licensing costs.-Subscription edition pricing can be as low as $99 per month-It allows customers flexibility to accommodate temporary staffing or peaks and valleys in business. -And with subscription, you always have the access to all enhancements and the latest versions as soon as they are released. So it’s more affordable than ever to get the latest version and stay current.We expect the subscription edition to appeal to a variety of Creative Professionals including designers on an older versions of Creative Suite (like CS1), which no longer qualify for upgrade pricing, customers who are point product users and want to try out a suite edition without the large up-front upgrade price and small business owners who are looking for flexibility when staffing their business. Subscription edition will make it possible for everyone to enjoy the most current Adobe Creative Suite software.
  • So, to help designers capitalize on the changing landscape, Adobe is making CS5 even better.Adobe is committed to enabling our customers to not only keep up with market trends, but to keep ahead of them and capitalize on them. This means that we need to innovate quickly so that we can provide the tools our customers need, when they need them. In this case, by enabling designers to create content for the multitude of new devices coming to market, and making production easier on the design and interactivity side, Adobe helps our customers take full advantage of the changes in the marketplace.To support this pace, we will be changing our release schedule so that we can keep customers ahead of these trends. Whereas in the past we had an 18-month Creative Suite release schedule, we will now be moving to a schedule of milestone releases every two years, but with targeted releases in between that deliver the technology our customers need to keep ahead in the areas where technology is shifting. This new release schedule starts now with the release of CS5.5, announcing on April 11, 2011.Our goal with this release is to enable designers to participate in creating content for the latest devices. So we’re not updating every application, we’re targeting specific features and workflows in the point products that are used to author content for tablets and smart phones. For Design Suite customers, feature updates will be added to InDesign, Dreamweaver, Flash Professional and Flash Catalyst. We’ll also take this opportunity to add Acrobat X Pro (the latest version of Acrobat introduced in late 2010) to both Design Standard and Design Premium. And as mentioned earlier, we are also announcing a new Subscription Edition that makes the latest Creative Suite features available without up-front licensing costs.-Subscription edition pricing can be as low as $99 per month-It allows customers flexibility to accommodate temporary staffing or peaks and valleys in business. -And with subscription, you always have the access to all enhancements and the latest versions as soon as they are released. So it’s more affordable than ever to get the latest version and stay current.We expect the subscription edition to appeal to a variety of Creative Professionals including designers on an older versions of Creative Suite (like CS1), which no longer qualify for upgrade pricing, customers who are point product users and want to try out a suite edition without the large up-front upgrade price and small business owners who are looking for flexibility when staffing their business. Subscription edition will make it possible for everyone to enjoy the most current Adobe Creative Suite software.
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Enhanced Multiscreen Preview panel -- With Dreamweaver CS5.5 enhancements to the Multiscreen Preview panel, you can view three different screen sizes and run your code in real time. This new functionality allows you to quickly and easily preview your designs for smartphones, tablets, and PC screens. You can also preview custom screen sizes and custom styles for each device. The Multiscreen Preview panel helps you create CSS media queries and display separate style sheets for each device. Design view has been updated to read your media queries. As you change the size of Design view, the corresponding media query is applied, which allows you to switch between styles in real time. Simply resize Design view to another size and design for that device. - New Media Queries dialog box -- provides a robust method for generating and applying multiple media queries to your page or a site-wide media query file. With Dreamweaver CS5.5, you now have the tools to rapidly adapt existing websites and applications for multiple devices on the same code base. Enhanced CSS3 and HTML5 supportEnhancements to Dreamweaver CS5.5 coding tools and workflow provide a new level of support for CSS3 and HTML5. Updates to the CSS panel, user interface, Live View, and advanced media queries help you be more productive as you design and develop for the web and mobile devices. - Updated Live View - CSS3 code hinting - Enhanced CSS panel—The CSS panel is the go-to place for quickly parsing and editing complex sets of styles. - More integrated support for HTML5—Dreamweaver CS5.5 helps you quickly and seamlessly apply your web skills to mobile design. WebKit support for mobile starter layouts, improved code hinting, and integrated management makes it easier than ever to harness the power of HTML5 innovations.Robust new jQuery integration -- Coding just became more powerful, with integrated jQuery code hinting and starter layouts for many different types of mobile devices in Dreamweaver CS5.5. jQuery is the industry-leading JavaScript framework, so integrating it with Dreamweaver CS5.5 for extended jQuery code hinting makes it easier than ever to build robust user interfaces for mobile projects. If you are a web designer, you will appreciate how quickly you can add interactivity to web pages. If you are a developer, you will appreciate how the jQuery framework helps speed up the coding.PhoneGap integration to build native Android and iOS apps -- As web browsing becomes available on an ever-growing number of smartphones and tablets,you need solid support for the “write once–publish anywhere” development model. To streamline your projects, the PhoneGap framework is now integrated as an extension in Dreamweaver CS5.5. Using PhoneGap, you can build native Android and iOS apps directly from Dreamweaver CS5.5 projects. This also allows you to use your existing web development skills, assets, and resources—with no need to learn a new development model. With PhoneGap, you can write a mobile app using standards-based technologies (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript). You can add device-specific functionality, such as multi-touch, geolocation, and accelerometer features. To finish up, Dreamweaver assists you in compiling and packaging the app for direct delivery to the device or to vendor-specific online app stores.Live View enhancements for more accurate rendering - With Dreamweaver CS5.5 enhancements to Live View, you can now preview and manage yourweb, mobile, and multiscreen projects with greater accuracy and all at the same time.W3C validation for improved accuracy Dreamweaver CS5.5 uses the live W3C validation service for increased accuracy and high-qualitycode results for multiple versions of XHTML and HTML.Support for Subversion 1.7 VCS - Dreamweaver CS5.5 offers enhanced support and updated libraries for the Subversion® version control system (VCS). Version control and file management are vital elements of a web project’s success, no matter how large or small your design and development team.New FTPS and FTPeS support for more secure transfers Dreamweaver CS5.5 supports FTPS (FTP over SSL) and FTPeS (FTP over explicit TLS/SSL) as nativetransfer protocols. These two FTP variants are growing in popularity because they enable more secure, encrypted transfer of your files
  • Enhanced Multiscreen Preview panel -- With Dreamweaver CS5.5 enhancements to the Multiscreen Preview panel, you can view three different screen sizes and run your code in real time. This new functionality allows you to quickly and easily preview your designs for smartphones, tablets, and PC screens. You can also preview custom screen sizes and custom styles for each device. The Multiscreen Preview panel helps you create CSS media queries and display separate style sheets for each device. Design view has been updated to read your media queries. As you change the size of Design view, the corresponding media query is applied, which allows you to switch between styles in real time. Simply resize Design view to another size and design for that device. - New Media Queries dialog box -- provides a robust method for generating and applying multiple media queries to your page or a site-wide media query file. With Dreamweaver CS5.5, you now have the tools to rapidly adapt existing websites and applications for multiple devices on the same code base. Enhanced CSS3 and HTML5 supportEnhancements to Dreamweaver CS5.5 coding tools and workflow provide a new level of support for CSS3 and HTML5. Updates to the CSS panel, user interface, Live View, and advanced media queries help you be more productive as you design and develop for the web and mobile devices. - Updated Live View - CSS3 code hinting - Enhanced CSS panel—The CSS panel is the go-to place for quickly parsing and editing complex sets of styles. - More integrated support for HTML5—Dreamweaver CS5.5 helps you quickly and seamlessly apply your web skills to mobile design. WebKit support for mobile starter layouts, improved code hinting, and integrated management makes it easier than ever to harness the power of HTML5 innovations.Robust new jQuery integration -- Coding just became more powerful, with integrated jQuery code hinting and starter layouts for many different types of mobile devices in Dreamweaver CS5.5. jQuery is the industry-leading JavaScript framework, so integrating it with Dreamweaver CS5.5 for extended jQuery code hinting makes it easier than ever to build robust user interfaces for mobile projects. If you are a web designer, you will appreciate how quickly you can add interactivity to web pages. If you are a developer, you will appreciate how the jQuery framework helps speed up the coding.PhoneGap integration to build native Android and iOS apps -- As web browsing becomes available on an ever-growing number of smartphones and tablets,you need solid support for the “write once–publish anywhere” development model. To streamline your projects, the PhoneGap framework is now integrated as an extension in Dreamweaver CS5.5. Using PhoneGap, you can build native Android and iOS apps directly from Dreamweaver CS5.5 projects. This also allows you to use your existing web development skills, assets, and resources—with no need to learn a new development model. With PhoneGap, you can write a mobile app using standards-based technologies (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript). You can add device-specific functionality, such as multi-touch, geolocation, and accelerometer features. To finish up, Dreamweaver assists you in compiling and packaging the app for direct delivery to the device or to vendor-specific online app stores.Live View enhancements for more accurate rendering - With Dreamweaver CS5.5 enhancements to Live View, you can now preview and manage yourweb, mobile, and multiscreen projects with greater accuracy and all at the same time.W3C validation for improved accuracy Dreamweaver CS5.5 uses the live W3C validation service for increased accuracy and high-qualitycode results for multiple versions of XHTML and HTML.Support for Subversion 1.7 VCS - Dreamweaver CS5.5 offers enhanced support and updated libraries for the Subversion® version control system (VCS). Version control and file management are vital elements of a web project’s success, no matter how large or small your design and development team.New FTPS and FTPeS support for more secure transfers Dreamweaver CS5.5 supports FTPS (FTP over SSL) and FTPeS (FTP over explicit TLS/SSL) as nativetransfer protocols. These two FTP variants are growing in popularity because they enable more secure, encrypted transfer of your files
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Key Points:Producing across many screen sizes and types is critical to successRich, interactive content is key to keeping your customers engaged with your brandDetailENVIRONMENT HAS BEEN CHANGING The media landscape that content authors inhabit is changing because there’s a multiscreen revolution occurring.Smartphones and tablets are driving this revolution. In 2014 expect to see more Internet-connected users on mobile devices than we see on PCs. Today, iPhone and iOS users use applications on average 79 minutes a day and they download about nine new applications every month. Android has now surpassed iOS in number of devices sold and Adobe can look forward to a plethora of new Android tablets coming to market. Likewise RIM has not stood still and the market is anticipating a game-changing introduction for the Blackberry Playbook in 2011. And there are some really interesting specialized devices out there, particularly in the eBook market – with the Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, all responding to the tablet threat with improved product offerings. If you’re a content author, there’s never been more options to have your content consumed on the go.  The second is that we are seeing a demand for rich content. Static consumer content or cumbersome enterprise applications just don't cut it anymore. People are demanding a lot more, whether as a consumer or as an employee. And third, the channel to reach those customers is fragmenting. It used to be that you could just build a web site for a PC, then you started to build a web site for mobile devices; and now Adobe have to also build applications for app stores. And those application stores are fragmented, as well. There's not just one or two stores; there’s 35 of them.  And lastly, content publishers have recognized that as they move content online and more of their business moves online they can't rely on the old business models. So they're starting to experiment with new business models -- more targeted advertising, selling apps and content instead of giving them away for free. In app purchases of add-on content, a practice pioneered in the online gaming business, is also being trialed by some of the more innovative publishers out there. One reason for optimism, if you are a content author, is that people do seem to be willing to pay for enhanced digital experiences that showcase unique content. Design and interactivity are positively impacting the value associated with their content. Wired Magazine is a great example.  WIRED publisher, Conde Nast, worked closely with Adobe to deliver a digital edition of WIRED for iPad and they sold more issues of WIRED in the digital form than in the print form. And they did that without cannibalizing the print publication itself. People were willing to pay $5 an issue on an iPad for a WIRED “experience” when they could have just gone to Wired.com and gotten a lot of the same content for free. It's because the experience really made the difference: enhanced video content to build out a story, animations to show how a product works, advertising that uses interactivity to grab the reader’s attention and showcase our favorite brands like never before.  Content has been devalued for too long and well-designed interactive experiences can help the creative industries build long term businesses around their unique content offerings.And remember these trends don’t just effect content authors for media and publishing companies. They effect every marketing professional on the planet. We’ve already discussed how Nike is exploiting the multiscreen revolution to build its brand in discreet communities via mobile apps. Any company that wants to build its brand in this mobile digital age, has to be targeting mobile devices as part of its marketing strategy. BUSINESS CHALLENGESThe bottom line is that for companies, enterprises and brands, these trends are directly impacting revenues and margins – associated with their media properties or marketing campaigns. Delivering content for a multiscreen, interactive, multichannel world is difficult. Multiple devices means you have to deal with multiple operating systems, multiple browsers, multiple form factors, multiple input mechanisms. It can require additional headcount to creative teams, or a new team altogether just to target one mobile platform. There can be skills gaps that have to plugged with training to ensure that creative professionals can live up to the expectations of audiences in terms of interactivity or availability of their content on their favorite mobile platform.  And for publishers and broadcasters there is the age old question of how to build businesses around their unique content. The buzz word that is “monetization”. While publishers and broadcasters are excited about what they see here in terms on new digital platforms like Android and iOS devices, they recognize the emergence of walled gardens pose a threat. The introduction of 30 percent tax on any content delivered through these walled gardens worries them. The question of who owns the customer, the question of who owns the data associated with those applications is of concern to them. They want to be able to offer subscription services that tie a printed publication to a digital version – and the walled garden approach is delaying publication launches and causing distrust between technology companies and the media industry as a whole.Despite these challenges, the end goal is clear: creative professionals and the media companies, enterprises and brands they work for must deliver interactive content – that can be monetized or drive brand value – across multiple channels. And do it at speed. So what’s Adobe doing to help speed the delivery of interactive content?
  • Transparency in design elements, column text, banners, footers pick list of different column layouts- tilted & rounded design elements that are placed upon a page much like “a layer” in Photoshop- embed video/audio with HTML5 tags- Greg Rewis’s CS5 Sneak Preso to the Adobe Education leaders (AELs) in Feb explains a lot of the new features.
  • - Transparencia en los elementos de diseño, - Texto de la columna, banners, pies de página  lista de selección de diseños de columna diferentes Elementos de diseño inclinadas y redondeadas que se colocan en una página muy similar a una "capa" en Photoshop Incrustar vídeo / audio con etiquetas HTML5
  • SUBS- SET UP CHALLENGESGet current and stay current without the large upfront investmentMove up to a suite from an individual productAccommodate temporary staffing and peaks and valleys in businessDiscover Creative Suite software for the first timeAffordable morning payments withno big start-up costThe choice of a more economicalone-year plan or a month-to-month plan you can stop and start as neededAccess to the most current version atno extra charge, as long as your subscription is activeIf you need to shorten these intothree simple pillars:AffordableFlexibleAlways up-to-date
  • SUBS- SET UP CHALLENGESGet current and stay current without the large upfront investmentMove up to a suite from an individual productAccommodate temporary staffing and peaks and valleys in businessDiscover Creative Suite software for the first timeAffordable morning payments withno big start-up costThe choice of a more economicalone-year plan or a month-to-month plan you can stop and start as neededAccess to the most current version atno extra charge, as long as your subscription is activeIf you need to shorten these intothree simple pillars:AffordableFlexibleAlways up-to-date

Descubriendo HTML5 con Adobe Dreamweaver Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Descubriendo el HTML5 con Adobe Dreamweaver© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 2. Luis Palacios Castro Co-Manager del AUGE Director de Tecnologías de Geeks Ecuador @luispalaciosc© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 3. Paradigmas de un Diseñador Web  Que el maquetador construya el website tal cual yo lo hice en Photoshop  Yo no me meto con “El CODIGO” solo hago la interfaz  Las resoluciones , esas son un problema !! ¿ Por qué se demoran tanto en desarrollar lo que diseñe?© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 4. Los roles “Ideales” Diseñador Desarrollador Web Web Crea la interfaz web Desarrolla el sitio desde un software web , utiliza la de diseño interfaz para darle (Photoshop, funcionalidad por Fireworks, medios de software Illustrator). de desarrollo© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 5. ¿Cómo resolver el problema ?© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 6. ¿Cómo resolver el problema? Los diseñadores web necesitamos un programa con integración con nuestras herramientas comunes para crear websitessinnecesidad de saber tantos lenguajes y códigos, donde pueda ver mi diseño y lo pueda hacer funcionar a mi gusto. © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.Def: @cristalaby @freddier
  • 7. ¿Cómo resolver el problema? © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.Def: @cristalaby @freddier
  • 8. Lo nuevo de Dreamweaver CS5.5 •Panel de vista previa mejorada multipantalla( fácilmente una vista previa de los diseños de los smartphones, tabletas y pantallas de PC) • Nuevas pantallas de diálogo de Media-Queries • Soporte mejorado para CSS3 y HTML5 • Vista en vivo actualizada© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 8
  • 9. Lo nuevo de Dreamweaver CS5.5 •Sugerencias de código para CSS3. •Panel CSS mejorado. •Soporte integrado para HTML5 • La sólida integración de jQuery+ jQuery sugerencias para el código PhoneGapintegración para crear aplicaciones nativas para Android y iOS© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 9
  • 10. Lo nuevo de Dreamweaver CS5.5 •Vista en vivo mejorada para la web, móvil, y proyectos multipantalla •Validación W3C para mejorar la precisión • Soporte para Subversion1.7 VCS •FTPS y apoyo FTPES© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential. 10
  • 11. Voy a usar Dreamweaver, ¿y ahora? ¿Qué tecnología me ayudará con darle vida a mi diseño?© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 12. ¿Cómo resolver el problema? © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.Imagenes de http://www.distilled.net/
  • 13. ¿Cómo resolver el problema? © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.Imagenes de http://www.distilled.net/
  • 14. ¿Quees HTML 5? HTML5 es la actualización de HTML, el lenguaje en el que es creada la web, también es un termino para agrupar las nuevas tecnologías de desarrollo de aplicaciones web: HTML5, CSS3 y nuevas capacidades de Javascript, que apunta hacia una web semántica © 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.Def: @cristalaby @freddier
  • 15. Html5 NuevasCaracteristicas – Dreamweaver 5.5 ¿ Como diseñador podrías hacer lo siguiente en sus páginas web maquetadas? (Flechas rojas)© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 16. Html5 NuevasCaracteristicas – Dreamweaver 5.5 - Transparencia en los elementos de diseño, Incrustar vídeo / audio con etiquetas HTML5 - Texto de la columna, banners, pies de página lista de selección de diseños de columna diferentes - Elementos de diseño inclinadas y redondeadas que se colocan en una página muy similar a una "capa" en Photoshop© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 17. Diseñoydesarrollo de Contenido Web paramuchaspantallas  Integración con jquery mobile  Vista en vivo mejoradaparadiferentesdispositivos (multipantallas)  Contenidoescalable con Adobe Flash  Emulación HTML5 ynuevosoportepara Adobe Device Central  Mejorintegracióncon Phototoshopy Fireworks  Un solo contenido , diferentesmaneras de verlo.© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 18. Tusitiodebe verse bien en todos los navegadores  Dreamweaver tiene la funcionalidad “BrowserLab”  Puedes guardar el historial de tus sitios vistos en los navegadores ,mas populares© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 19. Dondeencontrarlo :© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.
  • 20. QuienesSomos: ADOBE http://auge.ec USER @AUGEcuador GROUP @cfmichael ECUADOR @luispalaciosc© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. Adobe Confidential.