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Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español
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Lotus Connections Versión 4 - Español

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En esta presentación comparto algunos consejos y Tips de como una Empresa Social impulsada con una tecnología apropiada como la de IBM puede ser una transformación primordial para la competitividad de …

En esta presentación comparto algunos consejos y Tips de como una Empresa Social impulsada con una tecnología apropiada como la de IBM puede ser una transformación primordial para la competitividad de una compañía en este mundo inteligente.

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  • Most business today are not well connected. If you asked a random colleague how would they find and connect with an expert outside of their domain, a new prospective customer, or your supply chain manager, the most common response is through email and phone. That is not always the most efficient process to do business.
  • A Social business expands on traditional modes of collaboration. A Social business engages with their employee workforce, customers, citizens, and partners. A Social business is transparent, yet secure in how they made decisions, develop products, supports customers, and goes to market with new services. A Social business is nimble, being able to move quickly in decision making, customer support, etc.
  • Leadership in social business involves establishing the characteristics of a Social Business. What makes them different, what makes them more successful? First, a social business is an engaged business. It thrives by creating networks that let people dynamically connect to other people and information. And it optimizes the value and utility of these networks with deep analytics. Second, social businesses tend to be more transparent. Their dynamic networks tend to be agnostic about traditional organizational divisions. They ignore silos, departments, geographies and titles. The full resources of the company can be engaged by colleagues and customers from any standpoint, inside or outside of the firewall. In short, these are open businesses. Third, this engagement and transparency enables a social business to be extremely nimble. Teams can assemble and respond at unprecedented speed to changing market conditions. The company presents a different, personalized face to each consumer.
  • The underling IBM Social Business Framework allows for a flexible delivery model based on your needs and requirements. We're seeing a trend in the Exceptional Work Experience continuing to leverage and deploy on-premise solutions but a strong movement to public cloud based offerings In the Exceptional Web Experience, we also continue to see investments in on-premises solutions but more a movement to private cloud offerings. As companies move to the cloud, our solutions allow for a hybrid deployment allowing your on-premises applications to continue to work and integrate with the cloud to provide a seamless user experience.
  • Key message: A Social Business is nothing you become, nor is it something that just happens once you make social tools available to your employees. It is something you consciously transform you organization into, with determination, suitable tools, conditions AND with help from IBM Global Business Services. This slide is not intended to raise initial excitement about Social Business, but to indicate how get there once you have raised awareness and interest through other messages, most probably about the business value of Social Business. C-Suite Caveat: It may be prudent to avoid using this slide with a CXO audience, since they may misinterpret the illustration as picturing them as the kid and IBM as the adult. That is not the intended message, though. The kid should rather be seen as an organization re-learning ways of working with curiosity and enthusiasm, but as the risk of misinterpretation may result in someone taking offence, it should be used with some caution. How to use the slide. The slide is intended for use either as a quick intro followed by more detailed slides to dig deeper into the topics listed on the slide (if you wish so) OR as the single slide to carry the entire presentation, with the presenter verbally expanding the messages along the way. The way to choose depends on many things, for example the audience and context, the presentation style that is comfortable for the presenter as well as the familiarity with the topic by the presenter (where the second approach is more demanding on the presenter as you need to keep it all in your head). STEP BY STEP (the comments below pertain primarily to internal collaboration, not that much to social analytics or social media marketing. I ’ ll try to supplement with that over time.) Suitable tools Our preferred tool for internal collaboration is IBM Connections, of course. The slide does not lose its ’ validity for similar tools from competitors. It doesn ’ t stop there, though, as the “ suitable tools ” may well be Atlas (SmallBlue), Cognos Customer Intelligence (for analysis of unstructured social data in sentiment analysis etc). It all depends on the balance of client characteristics, context, social maturity, business challenges and opportunities as well as ambition. A good place to start therefore is for us to do an initial analysis to help clients sort this out. An analysis that to some extent can be seen as a way to scope which software and services we might be able to sell. The GBS offering is called the Social Business Strategy Business Value Accelerator, a limited consultancy offering of 6-8 or 12-16 weeks depending on level of ambition. Another aspect of suitable tools may be integration with existing applications; Intranet, CRM, Sales, Marketing and Customer Service tools, Innovation and Product Development etc Infrastructure There are people who are much better suited to describe suitable infrastructure than me. (If you ’ re one of them, please give me a nudge and I ’ ll gladly give you edit access so you can update this part of the speaker notes for the benefit of others). However, there is one aspect I think is important. It needs to be reliable and scalable. Reliable since tools like Connections quickly becomes part and parcel of the daily work of those who adopt their use. Downtime is met with as little tolerance as any other foundational tools needed to do your work, like mail clients. Scalable since you (your client, rather) will experience a fast rise in adoption and use of the tools and unless it is easily scalable you ’ re likely to run into issues with reliability. Other infrastructure aspects to consider are: Mobility – as Connections does not do replication, pervasive access is all the more important Access for people off company sites (VPN etc) Is there a major proportion of the work force that doesn ’ t have a proprietary computer? Maybe try kiosks or mobile access for them instead. Safety measures Safety/Security is often a concern of executives when considering going social: Are there risks of leakage of Intellectual capital? Risks of breaching client confidentiality? Risks of staff leaking confidential or damaging information? (compare with the Google employee who mistakenly published a rant about Google+ externally instead of internally only) Risks of bad behaviour among colleagues internally? Risks of getting in conflict with laws and agreements on Personal Information? How do you behave as a company representative on external collaboration platforms (like Twitter, Google+ or Facebook) We have come across all or most of these, both internally and when working with clients and know how to counter or reduce the risks. Many of them are simply resolved by employees having to be signed in when working in collaboration spaces. The mere absence of anonymity increases caution and self-censorship. Avoiding having solutions that bridge the firewall is another simple approach Establishing and communicating policies for how to behave in the social spaces (both internally and externally) is another area where we can help. Here the IBM Social Computing Guidelines is one of our references or even sales arguments (available publicly – just google those words) Etc. An interesting approach here is to think “ what ’ s the risk of not doing this? ” . It may well be greater, for example if employees start discussing things in public forums that should have been kept confidential. Identify and deal with obstacles There are many factors that may reduce social business adoption and this is probably where our experience can do the most good for clients. Not all obstacles can be removed. Some can, others can be counterbalanced, yet others have to be dealt with by navigating around them. But to do any of those, you first need to be aware of them. Here are some examples of traps not to be tripped over: ENABLERS Steering – In a collaborative environment, communication criss-crosses left, right and center. Not only may this feel unfamiliar or even threatening to communications professionals who may have been used to being driving communication in a traditional top-down approach. If the company moves from a traditional top-down-information-distribution intranet to one where collaboration is integrated into the intranet, this may well have an impact on budgets and governance. From a situation where the intranet – and the budget for it – was a matter for Internal Communications, since it was a and arena where they had the initiative integration of collaborative elements changes it into a work tool for all employees, making it an area of interest of all facets of the company: HR, Business Units etc. All will be affected, all will want influence and all may be asked to pay. Appraisal system – The benefits of collaboration are often hard to measure, not reaped by your own unit and subject to chance and contexts. Spending 30 minutes to share documents may look like a waste of time for you personally and for your unit, but might end up saving hours or days of time for unidentified colleagues elsewhere, enable them to offer services they might not have been able to offer otherwise etc. But how do you know? How is it measured? Can these benefits for the company be traced back to you? Traditional appraisal systems often look upon collaboration efforts as a waste of time, not an investment. Policy/Processes – We touched upon social computing policies before. You need to check for various policies that may need supplementing with social aspects or that may be entirely counter-collaborative. Technology – Apart from what has already been mentioned under Suitable Tools, Infrastructure and Safety measures, you also need to look out for the common “ document management ” mindset, frequently mistaken for collaboration – where people believe that sharing documents is what collaboration is all about. PEOPLE More people-oriented obstacles that frequently occur are: Inertia – Old habits die hard. People are used to sending mails with attachments. Uploading files and sharing them is not self-evident. Neither is sharing and trusting others when you have been fostered to think that hinting at but not giving away knowledge is power. Why should I change? How big is the critical mass and how do you reach it? The primary way of overcoming this is through communication, motivation and training/support. Resistance – Some people do not stop at inertia, but are frankly hostile to collaboration. Typical comments are: “ An internal Facebook is just another opportunity to waste time ” or “ Yet another tool to learn how to handle ” . Most of those arguments can be overcome by doing good work at the enablers above. Thereafter it is, to a large extent, a matter of even more motivation and communication. Leaders – Executives and managers are key to collaboration adoption. The logic of the word leader means that others are supposed to follow. If you don ’ t get leaders on board and acting as ambassadors and as living show-cases, you will fight an uphill battle. After having learned for an entire career that you need to manage, control and define processes it is a pretty large leap of faith to change to empower, trust and rely on chance and opportunity. Do keep in mind that the usual business controls are not removed just because you become a social business. Still, letting lose information and communications may be frightening for a traditional manager who may have served as a channel of vertical communications for ages. Emphasize business and personal benefits and spend a major effort on leaders early on in the adoption work. Internal Communications – As mentioned above under Steering, the paths of communication change drastically in a social business. This goes for external communications as well as internal communications. Every employee can become his or her own publisher and customers will want to get in touch directly with the people in the know or in power, not with any “ communications filter ” . Therefore the role of Communications professionals takes on much more of a coaching dimension instead of being in the driver ’ s seat. This is may be a considerable conceptual change for some communications professionals. In addition, the increased exposure and potential impact of employees being active in public social media puts a unforgiving spotlight on the awareness and understanding of company values as well as the understanding of how to behave in public as a, maybe unofficial but still, representative of the employer. In the context of social media marketing, a common obstacle is lack of understanding of just how social media work. It is depressingly common to see marketing departments use social media as just another channel to broadcast their usual marketing messages and links to press releases. They completely miss the social dimension – dialogue. Listen, listen and respond. As publishing of social media messages usually is made through established channels like Twitter, Facebook, Google+ et al, IBM has little to offer apart from advice and consultancy (which isn ’ t too bad anyway). We do have great products for “ listening ” though: Cognos Consumer Insight, COBRA, SPSS Text Analytics and Unica. There is one more aspect – often overlooked – to make your own public website support and simplify social sharing and recommending. Motivation Transforming an organization into a social business is a major change for a company, just as it is takes a concerted effort for a person to change their customary ways of working and thinking into a collaborative way of working. It ’ s nothing you do just for fun or because an expert tells you to. You need to understand and be convinced of what is in it for you. You need motivation. Motivation enough to persist over a period of time too. There is considerable overlap of the benefits of going social for employers and employees, but there are some benefits that are unique to one or the other. Also the emphasis on different benefits differs between employers and employees. Motivational communications have to be carefully tailored to the audience, therefore. From an organizational perspective we usually talk about: Nimble – Speeding up business with information and insight to anticipate and address evolving opportunities Transparent – Removing boundaries to information, experts and assets, helping people align every action to drive business results Engaged – Deeply connecting people, including customers, employees and partners, to be involved in productive, efficient ways As this split and description primarily takes the organizational perspective, I ’ ll sort things a bit differently, in a way that I find nicely links personal and organizational benefits (my split is less easy to use when talking about external aspects of social business, though): Efficiency and agility Shorter runway, faster resolution of challenges – Through easier and greater access to experts and their expertise as manifested in documents, blog entries, wikis etc, employees spend less time starting up projects and working to resolve challenges. They can easily find experts to ask and information to re-use. Win for the organization and win for the employee. This also means possibilities of improved competitiveness or better profitability as well as more satisfied customers through speed of start-up and delivery, hopefully leading to improved customer/client loyalty and repeat purchases. Don ’ t invent the wheel again, and again… and again – Through re-use of proven solutions and documents, frustration is reduced, speed is increased (as just mentioned) and there is a good chance of improved quality since you hopefully avoid making mistakes over, and over, and over again. Frequently, particularly when people have an old fashioned knowledge management mindset, there is a tendency to think only about sharing prescriptive documentation; best practices, frameworks etc that have been produced and approved by SME ’ s and management. An oft overlooked kind of expertise is the examples from the field of how those prescriptions actually were implemented. Compare it with a knitting pattern (prescriptive) and pictures of knitted results with comments that supplement the patterns. Knowledge growth Knowledge growth is encouraged in two dimensions: Extend the base – Through ease of sharing and distributing expertise, it becomes more widespread and more people can make good use of it Grow the peak – The acknowledgement and appreciation of your expertise that is generated in the collaborative arena motivates further development by the experts themselves Knowledge retention Less sensitive to team changes – As it is easier to share knowledge between team members – in a restricted team community for example – it is easier to onboard new team members. People may leave the organization, but their knowledge stays – Subject to employment agreements, this can be an important factor for companies facing waves of employees going into retirement or downsizing. Admittedly, this is more of an organizational benefit than one for the individual. Employee recruitment, motivation and retention Graduates are likely to favour organizations that are modern, open and collaborative. Social networking is “ the way things are done ” and the absence of such possibilities within a company may negatively affect recruitment success Discover greener grass on your own side – Through the increased transparency of the organization and wider networks (and less limited by geographies and formal structures) it is more likely that employees who feel stuck may find a new role within the company rather than leaving it altogether. Motivation – Humans are social creatures. The absolute majority of us like better to work in an environment where you are encouraged to liaise with peers and where you have better chances of building your knowledge according to your own agenda. Inspiration and business development (innovation) Through the greater exposure of experience and ideas resulting from a collaborative environment, it is more likely that someone may stumble across ideas and experience that they mind be able to build on, improve or combine in new innovative ways. Through information encountered by chance in status updates or blogs, employees may realize that their experience may help others build business, like for example when somebody writes that they are planning to visit a customer where you have worked and can give them some insight that helps them gain the confidence of the people they meet. Innovation thrives where people meet – It used to be over the water cooler or in the lunch room. In a social business you add the possibility to meet online in communities, through networking etc encouraging chance meetings of people and information, possible to combine into new, innovative ways. Compare that with a mail inbox where everything is targeted at you for one reason or another. What is the probability of chance discoveries in an overbearing inbox? (did you notice how these benefits maps rather well with the ideas motivating the kid in the illustration?) Learning… and determination As I started off these speaker notes “ A Social Business is nothing you become, nor is it something that just happens once you make social tools available to your employees. It is something you consciously transform you organization into, with determination, suitable tools and conditions ” . It is something you have to learn to become, both as an organization as an individual. A common mistake – and a likely reason for the high (70%) failure rates – is that organizations do a technical implementation of social tools and then expect adoption to grow out of sheer “ fun and enthusiasm ” . That may work for things like Facebook where the motivation is purely social and private (at least originally). In an organization, there is an entire culture and work processes that usually works against collaboration. You need to work consciously and diligently to transform your organization. This is why the motivation for the top Executives is decisive. If they do not sponsor the transformation and are in for the long haul, you are likely to run into trouble. This also applies very well to marketing and customer service using external social media. Trust is the core value and determinant of social marketing and trust has to be earned. (But once earned, it usually is long-lived unless you make major blunders). Therefore, results take time before they start showing. Give it a year or so of persistent work in social media before you expect to see any tangible results. You need a well conceived, structured and executed transformation project to change the organization. We have the tools and the experience for that. Coach Finally, and naturally, someone who has never bicycled before is wise to listen to an experienced coach. Someone who has done it before, knows what to do, what not to do, what to look out for and who can help with methods and encouragement. Someone like IBM Global Business Services. (ok, some kids do learn how to bicycle without having a coach to help them, but they need much more motivation and the likelihood of getting hurt when falling is much greater)
  • Transcript

    • 1. IBM Collaboration SolutionsLotus ConnectionsLuis Felipe Garzón TorresiSSR ICS para SSAIBM Software Grouplfgarzon@co.ibm.com@lfelipegarzont
    • 2. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.a business ...
    • 3. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.EngagedTransparentNimblea socialsocial business ...
    • 4. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Un Negocio social une a redes de personaspara crear valor dentro del negocio...ConectadoTransparenteÁgil
    • 5. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.On PremisesOn PremisesPublicPublicCloudCloudPrivatePrivateCloudCloudHybridHybridIBM Social Business FrameworkUn modelo de ejecución del negocio Social...ExceptionalExperienceExceptionalExperienceExperienciade trabajoExcepcionalExperienciade WebExcepcional
    • 6. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.InformationManagementInformationManagementBusinessApplicationsBusinessApplicationsUniversal AccessUniversal AccessOpen Standards ArchitectureOpen Standards ArchitectureMessaging Communicating Connecting IntegratingKnowledge Worker Informational Worker (Boundary) External Partners6CloudOnPremisesIBM Collaboration Solutions Platform …
    • 7. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Características Lotus Connections.Home pageVer que esta pasando a través de lasredes sociales empresariales.BlogsPresente su propias ideas y aprendade otros.ComunidadesTrabajar con las personas quienestienen intereses en común y conlos expertos.ArchivosGuardar, compartir y descubrirdocumentos, presentaciones, imagenes,y más.Micro-bloggingBuscar por ayuda o compartir noticias consu red social empresarialPerfilesEncuentra personas que necesitas, unavisión 360º de las personas y su trabajo.WikisCrear contenido Web juntosAnalítica SocialDescubrir quien y que no conoce porrecomendaciones.ActividadesOrganizar su trabajo y coordinar asu red profesional de trabajo.MarcadoresGuardar, compartir y descubrirMarcadores (URLs)ForosIntercambiar ideas y beneficiarse delconocimiento de los demás.MóvilAcceda a Lotus Connections donde sea, acualquier hora con dispositivos móviles ytabletas.
    • 8. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Experiencia Móvil.
    • 9. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Encontrando al experto
    • 10. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Creando conversaciones.
    • 11. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Compartiendo
    • 12. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Iniciando y gestionando Tareas con Actividades.
    • 13. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Comunidades
    • 14. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Perfiles
    • 15. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Social Analytics
    • 16. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Métricas
    • 17. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Cliente de correo integrado. (Social Mail)
    • 18. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.Experiencia Móvil
    • 19. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.La transformación en una empresa social escomo…VelocidadNuevos HorizontesFlexibilidadLibertadHerramientasAdecuadasIdentificar ysortear losobstáculosMotivaciónInfraestructuraCoachMedidas de Seguridad…aprender a montar enBicicletaAprendizajeTu necesitas……y determinación
    • 20. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.¡MuchasGracias!Thank You!Obrigado
    • 21. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.21Luis Felipe Garzón TorresInside Software Sales RepCollaboration SolutionsCarrera 53 No 100-25Bogotá, ColombiaTel: +57 1 6282564lfgarzon@co.bm.comGracias!
    • 22. © 2011 IBM Corporation#getsocial11 - Get Social. Do Business.LET SEE

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