Webquests: A tool to develop thinking skills Lucía Ramírez Anglo Colombian School Bogotá, Colombia
<ul><li>Introduction (10 min) </li></ul><ul><li>What is a Webquest (20 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Look for examples (20 min) <...
WEBQUEST WHAT IS IT? WHY USE IT? ITS STRUCTURE TYPES WHICH TOPICS CAN BE USED? TEACHER’S  ROLE STUDENTS’ ROLE WQ AND  THIN...
Tell me and I’ll forget. Show me and I might remember. Involve me and I’ll understand. -Author Unknown
What is a Webquest? &quot;A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which some or all of the information that learners...
&quot;The best WebQuests do this in a way that inspires students to see richer thematic relationships, facilitate a contri...
Why use a Webquest? <ul><li>Makes use of primary, up-to-date materials </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulates learners with an inter...
Structure of a Webquest Introduction  sets the stage and provides some background information.  Task  that is doable and i...
Types of Webquests <ul><li>WebQuests can be either short-term or longer-term </li></ul><ul><li>Short-term (1-3 lessons) wh...
The role of teacher and students <ul><li>Teacher    Facilitator of the process </li></ul><ul><li>Students    Active part...
What kinds of topics lend  themselves to Webquests? <ul><li>WebQuests can’t be used to teach factual pieces of information...
Image taken from   http://www.logo.com/twp/intro_images/thinking_skills.jpg
<ul><li>CRITICAL THINKING </li></ul><ul><li>Students should be taught to think logically, analyze and compare, question an...
&quot;Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skilfully conceptualizing, applying, ana...
<ul><li>How can we teach critical thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>By using  graphic organisers  (e.g. Venn diagrams, Flow char...
<ul><li>What does critical thinking involve? </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing : Identifying and articulating similarities and d...
References <ul><li>Air War College (n/d).  Creativity & thinking skills.  Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from  http://www.a...
References <ul><li>Foundation for Critical Thinking (2008).  Critical Thinking: Where to begin . Retrieved November 16th, ...
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WebQuests: a tool to develop thinking skills

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Rio Workshop Conference. November, 2008.

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  • O Colombiano
  • WebQuests: a tool to develop thinking skills

    1. 1. Webquests: A tool to develop thinking skills Lucía Ramírez Anglo Colombian School Bogotá, Colombia
    2. 2. <ul><li>Introduction (10 min) </li></ul><ul><li>What is a Webquest (20 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Look for examples (20 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Design your Webquest (1 hour) </li></ul><ul><li>Plenary (10 min) </li></ul>How is this workshop organised?
    3. 3. WEBQUEST WHAT IS IT? WHY USE IT? ITS STRUCTURE TYPES WHICH TOPICS CAN BE USED? TEACHER’S ROLE STUDENTS’ ROLE WQ AND THINKING SKILLS
    4. 4. Tell me and I’ll forget. Show me and I might remember. Involve me and I’ll understand. -Author Unknown
    5. 5. What is a Webquest? &quot;A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which some or all of the information that learners interact with comes from resources on the internet…&quot; (Dodge, 1995, cited by March, 2008) &quot;A WebQuest is a scaffolded learning structure that uses links to essential resources on the World Wide Web and an authentic task to motivate students’ investigation of a central, open-ended question, development of individual expertise and participation in a final group process that attempts to transform newly acquired information into a more sophisticated understanding. The best WebQuests do this in a way that inspires students to see richer thematic relationships, facilitate a contribution to the real world of learning and reflect on their own metacognitive processes.&quot; &quot; WebQuest,&quot; as defined by Tom March, circa 2003
    6. 6. &quot;The best WebQuests do this in a way that inspires students to see richer thematic relationships, facilitate a contribution to the real world of learning and reflect on their own metacognitive processes.&quot; 3 Rs of WebQuests:&quot; &quot;Is it Real, Rich and Relevant? Interdisciplinary relationships. Contextualizing the topic with what makes it worth learning. Authentic tasks -  authentic assessment Metacognition: students are aware of their own thinking patterns  independent use of these strategies
    7. 7. Why use a Webquest? <ul><li>Makes use of primary, up-to-date materials </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulates learners with an interesting do-able task </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses learners’ attention on outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes collaborative work </li></ul><ul><li>Improves research skills </li></ul><ul><li>Develops thinking skills </li></ul>
    8. 8. Structure of a Webquest Introduction sets the stage and provides some background information. Task that is doable and interesting. Information sources needed to complete the task. They do not necessarily come from the World Wide Web. Process description of the steps to accomplish the task. Conclusion that brings closure to the quest, reminds the learners about what they've learned, and perhaps encourages them to extend the experience into other domains. Evaluation includes the rubric to assess the task.
    9. 9. Types of Webquests <ul><li>WebQuests can be either short-term or longer-term </li></ul><ul><li>Short-term (1-3 lessons) where the goal is to allow for knowledge acquisition and integration </li></ul><ul><li>Longer-term (1 week – 1 month) where the goal is to extend and refine knowledge </li></ul>
    10. 10. The role of teacher and students <ul><li>Teacher  Facilitator of the process </li></ul><ul><li>Students  Active participants </li></ul>
    11. 11. What kinds of topics lend themselves to Webquests? <ul><li>WebQuests can’t be used to teach factual pieces of information. </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuests can help students meet standards focused on critical-thinking and analysis skills </li></ul><ul><li>They may be particularly useful for social studies and science. </li></ul><ul><li>By using multimedia, WebQuests also help with multiple intelligence work. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Image taken from http://www.logo.com/twp/intro_images/thinking_skills.jpg
    13. 13. <ul><li>CRITICAL THINKING </li></ul><ul><li>Students should be taught to think logically, analyze and compare, question and evaluate. Skills taught in isolation do little more than prepare students for tests of isolated skills (Spache and Spache, 1986). </li></ul>
    14. 14. &quot;Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skilfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth, and fairness...&quot; A statement by Michael Scriven & Richard Paul {presented at the 8th Annual International Conference on Critical Thinking and Education Reform, Summer 1987}.
    15. 15. <ul><li>How can we teach critical thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>By using graphic organisers (e.g. Venn diagrams, Flow charts, KWL charts, Concept maps, Tree charts, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>By stating the processes to be developed, e.g. compare, write a summary, analyse, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>By scaffolding </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>What does critical thinking involve? </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing : Identifying and articulating similarities and differences between things. </li></ul><ul><li>Classifying : Grouping things into definable categories on the basis of their attributes. </li></ul><ul><li>Inducing : Inferring unknown generalizations or principles from observations or analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>Deducing : Inferring unstated consequences and conditions from given principles and generalizations. </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing errors : Identifying and articulating errors in one's own or others' thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>Constructing support : Constructing a system of support or proof for an assertion. </li></ul><ul><li>Abstraction : Identifying and articulating the underlying theme or general pattern of information. </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing perspectives : Identifying and articulating personal perspectives about issues. </li></ul>
    17. 17. References <ul><li>Air War College (n/d). Creativity & thinking skills. Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-thkg.htm#cog </li></ul><ul><li>Dabbagh, N (n/d). Concept Mapping as a Mindtool for Critical Thinking . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.thestep.gr/trainmor/dat/%7B52fb953f-3495-4396-a847-7be1adf6d20d%7D/article.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Dodge, B. (1998). WebQuests: A Strategy for Scaffolding Higher Level Learning. Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://webquest.sdsu.edu/necc98.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Dodge, B. (2002). WebQuest Taskonomy: A Taxonomy for tasks . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http:// webquest.sdsu.edu/taskonomy.html </li></ul><ul><li>Dodge, B. (2007). What is a Webquest . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http:// webquest.org/index.php </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Broadcasting Corporation (2004). Workshop: Webquests . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/webquests/index.html </li></ul>
    18. 18. References <ul><li>Foundation for Critical Thinking (2008). Critical Thinking: Where to begin . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.criticalthinking.org/starting/index.cfm </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic.org (N/d). Graphic organizers . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.graphic.org/goindex.html </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Theories Knowledgebase (2008, November). ARCS Model of Motivational Design (Keller) at Learning-Theories.com . Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.learning-theories.com/kellers-arcs-model-of-motivational-design.html </li></ul><ul><li>March, T. (2008). What Webquests are (Really). Retrieved November 16th 2008 from http://bestwebquests.com/what_webquests_are.asp </li></ul><ul><li>Tomlinson (2000). What is differentiated instruction? Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/263 </li></ul><ul><li>Zheng, R., Stucky, B., McAlack, M., Menchana, M. & Stoddart, S. (n/d). WebQuest Learning as Perceived by Higher-Education Learners. Retrieved November 16th, 2008 from http://www.u.arizona.edu/~sakoi/webquest%20learning%20as%20perceived%20by%20higer-education%20learners.pdf </li></ul>

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