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  • The thematic content of the series: 1 Facts Revenue from the last two years; Localization; History and surroundings 2 Research Six strategic areas; Three Centres of Excellence; Laboratories; Cooperation with SINTEF; 3 Education and student activities Study areas and programmes of study; Quality Reform; Further- and continuing education; Internationalization 4 Innovation and relationships with business and industry Innovative activities; Agreements with the public and private sectors 5 Dissemination Publications, events and the mass media Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, NTNU Library 6 Organization and strategy Board and organization; Vision, goal and strategies; For more on terminology, see www.uhr.no/informasjon/index.htm (“terminologiliste”) See also www.ntnu.no/intersek/english_matters/ (”Selected administrative terms with translations”)
  • Norway: Population 4,7 million Trondheim: 160 000 inhabitants, at 63º N 7º E The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU): The second largest university in Norway, with 20 000 students and a staff providing 4300 man-years Norway is part of the Scandinavian peninsula on the northern outskirts of Europe. About two-thirds of Norway is mountainous, and its indented coastline of some 20 000 miles is dotted with at least 50 000 islands. Modern transport makes far away close at hand The airport has dozens of flights to/from Oslo every day, as well as direct connections with all Norwegian cities. International direct connections to Copenhagen, Amsterdam and London (Stanstead) on scheduled flights. There are frequent train connections with Oslo and the north. The coastal express liner service has daily departures for Bergen to the south and North Cape in the far north. Gulf Stream climate Trondheim has a milder climate in winter than could be expected because of its latitude as it is at the receiving end of the Gulf Stream. Visitors can expect two to three months of snow in winter, but few really cold spells. In the summer, expect temperate changeable conditions and a few periods of warm weather.
  • Life in Trondheim: Left: Coffee bar in Bakklandet. Photo: Norsk Bildebyrå/NTNU Info. Winter photo: Skiing in Bymarka (across Vintervannet lake). Photo: Norsk Bildebyrå/NTNU Info. Rainbow over Nidaros Cathedral, autumn 1999. Photo: Kenneth Aar/NTNU Info. Bottom: Gamle Bybro bridge, Bakklandet, October 2001. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info.
  • The number of applicants is taken from NTNU Table 1 in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research. (See also the table “Studentrapporter/Søknadstall” for NTNU at Database for Higher Education (DBH), dbh.nsd.uib.no). Note that the number of applications is much higher than the number of applicants, because a single applicant may apply to several study programmes at the same time. (See also Database for Higher Education (DBH), at www.nsd.uib.no) The total number of applications is the sum of the applications filed with the Universities and Colleges Admission Service (UCAS), which number approximately 40,000, and the applications that for various reasons (see below) come directly to NTNU. The number of primary applicants (applicants that have NTNU listed as their first choice) is taken from NUCAS (www.samordnaopptak.no), and from the NTNU annual press release in April/May. The term “primary applicants” only applies to those applicants coordinated through UCAS. The number does not include those applying directly to NTNU for a higher degree, for the cand.psychol. degree in psychology, applicants for the spring semester and applicants to The Trondheim Academy of Fine Art and performance studies in music (as a result of required entrance exams for admission). Approximately 6,900 were accepted (see above mentioned Table 1). The difference of approximately 3,000 between those accepted and the number of graduates is explained thusly: Those who graduate have completed a course of study here, for example in technology (MSc). Among those accepted, many will not complete a course of study for a lower/higher degree at NTNU. Some do not show up despite accepting a place at the university, some leave after a few weeks/months, some are accepted into studies of a shorter duration on the basis of main studies at another university, and some only follow individual courses as part of their continuing education. The admissions process may be divided into five stages: 1) Submitted applications; 2) Qualified applicants; 3) Study offers; 4) Acceptance of the study offer; 5) Arriving at the university and paying the semester fee. (Numbers for categories 1) and 5) are found in DBH.) The number of registered students is taken from Table 1 in in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research. The number of degrees awarded is taken from said Table 1 in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research, and the number of PhDs awarded from NTNU Table 5 in the same document. The number of employees is taken from dbh.nsd.uib.no for 2007 (Institusjon-stillingsgruppe-stillingskategori-stillingskode = Undervisnings-, forsknings- og formidlingsstilling) . The number of professors , adjunct professors (“prof. II”) not included, is from the same table, code 1013. The budget number is taken from The first table in the appendix to the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research. (Here 1 Euro is set at 8 NOK, a rate that may vary) The space estimate is taken from the category “Areal” in dbh.nsd.uib.no.
  • Numbers are generated from Note 1 to the NTNU accounts, an appendix in the university’s annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research: (Blue column) Ministry of Education & Research and other ministries. (Red column) The Research Council of Norway. (Yellow column) Business. (Green column) State/municipal: Sum of “State institutions” + “Counties/Municipalities”. (Light blue column) European Union (EU). (Grey column) Other: “Organizations” + “Foundations” + “Other + “Sale of real estate, equipment, etc.” + “Sum other income”. Here, the totals for NTNU are in mill. euro (calculated as 1 Euro = 8 NOK, a rate that may vary): 358 (2002), 383 (2003), 432 (2004), 444 (2005), 469 ( 2006), 525 (2007), 550 (2008).
  • See a complete list at www.ntnu.no/kart Photographs: Left: Natural Science Building, Campus Gløshaugen, February 2000. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info. Right: The main entrance to the Dragvoll campus, facing southeast, March 2008. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info.
  • Top left: Gløshaugen campus, in the west (left) Øya campus with the Faculty of Medicine and St. Olavs Hospital. (Photo: FW Foto AS/NTNU Info. Juli 2004.) Top right: the Marine Technology Centre at Tyholt. (Photo: Bård F. Gimnes/NTNU Info. August 2000.) Centre right: Lerkendal. (Photo: FW Foto AS/NTNU Info. July 2004.) Bottom left: Dragvoll campus. (Photo: FW Foto AS/NTNU Info. July 2004.) Bottom right: Gløshaugen campus with the main administration building from the west. (Photo: FW Foto AS/NTNU Info. July 2004.) Photos: (All photographs except top right) Fjellanger Widerøe Foto as/NTNU Info. (July 2004)
  • The Norwegian University of Science and Technology was established on 1 January 1996, as a result of the reorganization of the University of Trondheim. The university has its foundation in three institutions: the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH), the College of Arts and Science (AVH, 1922), and the Museum of Natural History and Archaeology (1760). The Faculty of Medicine, the Music Conservatory in Trondheim, and the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art were also included as a part of NTNU in the 1996 reorganization. See: http://www.ntnu.no/2010 and http://www.ntnu.no/omntnu/NTNUs_historie (in Norwegian only) Sources: Midbøe, Hans. 1960. Det Kongelige Norske Videnskabers Selskabs historie 1760 – 1960. Bd. I-II. Trondheim: DKNVS. Devik, Olaf. 1960. N.T.H. Femti år. Oslo: Teknisk Ukeblad. Kirkhusmo, Anders. 1983. Akademi og seminar. Norges Lærerhøgskole 1922–1982. Trondheim: Univ. i Trondheim – Norges lærerhøgskole/Tapir. Hanisch, T.J. og E. Lange. 1985. Vitenskap for industrien. NTH – En høyskole i utvikling gjennom 75 år. Oslo/Trondheim: Universitetsforlaget.
  • Top left: Professor Terje K. Lien at a robotic line for the assembly of a door lock system,  NTNU’s Department of Production and Quality Engineering Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Top right: Daniela Pawel works as an art preservationist at the Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, Section for Archaeology and Cultural History. Photo: Geir Gjelseth/NTNU Info. Bottom left: Mapping of global value change. From a social sciences research project at NTNU. Photo and montage: G.K./NTNU Info. Centre: Prof. Jens Hammerstrøm (middle) with two students. Microscopic diagnostics of haematological diseases, group session. The equipment allows four people to observe the samples simultaneously. Haematology lab, Section for Haematology. Photo: G.K:/NTNU Info. Centre lower left: Associate Professor and musicologist Ståle Kleiberg, with the Department of Musicology, was the 2000 composer of the season for the Trondheim Symphony Orchestra Photo: Lisa Olstad/NTNU Info. Centre lower right: Artist, Professor Ove Stokstad with the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art purifies the traditional printing technique. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Centre right: Grant recipient Anita Fossdal with the Department of Materials Science and engineering inserts a sample into a Siemens D5000 x-ray diffractometer. Photo: G.K./NTNU Info. Bottom right: Student ideas for developing the neighbourhood of Tempe. Project name “The Fifth Society”. Ill.: Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art, NTNU/Bruvik, Skarstein, Lund, Kaada. Bottom right: Dissolution containing mixture of lithium borate salts and rock samples in platinum crucibles. The chemical composition of the rock sample is determined with the help of X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info.
  • From NTNU’s strategic document “Constructive, Creative, Critical”, see: http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/aboutntnu/aboutntnu_strategy?menuSectionId=9765 Photo and illustration : Top: AC/DC transformer for the connection of solar panels. Department of Electrical Power Engineering. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Centre: Illustration for an article in Universitetsavisa 19/2000 about the event “NTNU – an interdisciplinary university?” Illustration: Elin Horn/NTNU Info.
  • The number of projects provided by the “Maconomy-system” of the university’s Financial Division, see chap. 1.4 i the annual report “Rapport og planer 2006-2007” to the Ministry of Education and Research . Cooperation with foreign universities regarding research: There is no official list. R&D cooperation between scientists takes place mostly on the personal level. Information from : The number of doctoral degrees, see Table 5 in the annual report “Rapport og planer 2008-2009” to the Ministry of Education and Research . The number of EU projects as reported by the administrative unit for R&D. Picture: Seaweeds at extreme low tide, shoreline of the Trondheimsfjord. Photo: Mentz Indergaard.
  • See chap. 2.1.1., chap. 3.2.1 and chap. 3.2.2 in the annual report to the Ministry of Education and Research (”Rapport og planer 2008-2009”). Per cent of foreign nationals calculated from the pay roll of NTNU.
  • Total number of doctoral contracts, see http://dbh.nsd.uib.no/dbhvev/doktorgrader/doktorgrad_personer_rapport NTNU doctoral programmes, see http://www.ntnu.no/studies/phd/programmes NTNU’s faculties offer a total of 44 doctoral programmes. In addition NTNU is responsible for six graduate schools in cooperation with other institutions, both national and international: Educational Governance is hosted by F aculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management. Medical Imaging is hosted by Faculty of Medicine. Text-Picture-Sound-Space; Language and linguistics and Nordic graduate school in gender studies are hosted by Faculty of the Humanities. Nanotechnology for microsystems is hosted by Faculty of Natural Sciences and Technology.
  • Information on SINTEF, see www.sintef.no In 2006 NTNU and SINTEF formalized a stronger cooperation, through the document “NTNU and SINTEF – Internationally outstanding together”. More than 500 people are jointly employed by NTNU and SINTEF. (SINTEF Annual Report 2007) The 19 Gemini Centres, see http://www.sintef.no/Home/About-us/The-Gemini-Centres-and-other-arenas-of-cooperation/ NTNU and SINTEF established jointly the first five Gemini Centres in 2003. The vision for the centres is that they should excel internationally. These academic communities are expected to establish common strategic processes and coordinated planning of applications for larger R&D projects and programmes. The groups will thus be better suited to creating innovation and contributing to business development.
  • Strategic and thematic activities, see ”Rapport og planer 2006-2007” kap. 3.2.1. Major interdisciplinary research activities: The Gas Technology Center, Centre for Renewable Energy, NTNU Nanolab, FUGE (Norwegian Functional Genomics initiative), Norwegian Centre for Electronic Patient Records (NSEP), Industrial Ecology (IndEcol), NTNU’s Programme for Interdisciplinary Research. See http://www.ntnu.no/forskning/forskn_strategiskeomraader Centres of Excellence and Centres of Research-based Innovation http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/research Nordic Five Tech: http://www.nordicfivetech.org/ Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; The Technical University of Denmark; Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Helsinki University of Technology, Finland Photo: Ole D. Hesledalen/NTNU Info.
  • http://www.ntnu.no/excellence Centre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems (Q2S) has as its primary task research and researcher education. The centre will build expertise and solutions that focus on the quality of future web services, such as the transfer of multimedia services, electronic trade, electronic mail and other web-based human interaction. Centre for the Biology of Memory (CBM) seeks to establish an internationally leading centre for the study of the biology of memory. The research is designed to map out how nerve cells in a normal brain work together to construct memories. Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures (CESOS) seeks to establish an internationally leading centre for the development of a basic understanding of the behaviour of maritime construction, by integrating theoretical and experimental research in hydrodynamics, structural engineering and control systems. The centre’s research should lay the foundation for the innovative design of the ships, platforms and maritime structures of the future. Illustration and photos: Top: Kolbjørn Skarpnes/NTNU Info Centre: A rat brain slice with an electrode inserted into the hippocampus under the microscope. Photo: Centre for the Biology of Memory. Bottom: On a research cruise with the F/F Håkon Mosby, owned by the University of Bergen, 1992. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/Norges Fiskeriforskningsråd.
  • One of NTNU’s three Centres of Excellence: Centre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems (Q2S) has as its primary task research and researcher education. The centre will build expertise and solutions that focus on the quality of future web services, such as the transfer of multimedia services, electronic trade, electronic mail and other web-based human interaction. http://www.q2s.ntnu.no/introduction
  • http://www.ntnu.no/cbm/ One of NTNU’s three Centres of Excellence: Centre for the Biology of Memory (CBM) seeks to establish an internationally leading centre for the study of the biology of memory. The research is designed to map out how nerve cells in a normal brain work together to construct memories. Photo: CBM
  • One of NTNU’s three Centres of Excellence: Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures (CESOS) seeks to establish an internationally leading centre for the development of a basic understanding of the behaviour of maritime construction, by integrating theoretical and experimental research in hydrodynamics, structural engineering and control systems. The centre’s research should lay the foundation for the innovative design of the ships, platforms and maritime structures of the future. http://www.cesos.ntnu.no/cesos/intro.php
  • Objectives The main objective for the Centres for Research-based Innovation (CRIs) is to enhance the capability of the business sector to innovate by focusing on long-term research based on forging close alliances between research-intensive enterprises and prominent research groups. The CRI scheme will: * Encourage enterprises to innovate by placing stronger emphasis on long-term research and by making it attractive for enterprises that work on the international arena to establish R&D activities in Norway. * Facilitate active alliances between innovative enterprises and prominent research groups. * Promote the development of industrially oriented research groups that are on the cutting edge of international research and are part of strong international networks. * Stimulate researcher training in fields of importance to the business community, and encourage the transfer of research-based knowledge and technology. In addition to hosting three centres, NTNU participates in 7 more of the 14 CRIs established in 2006, of which three are hosted by SINTEF, Trondheim. http://www.ntnu.no/research/sfi
  • http://www.ntnu.no/dmf/milab From the Annual Report 2007
  • http://www.ntnu.no/simlab From a series made by Rector’s office
  • http://www.ntnu.no/iocenter NCS = Norwegian Continental Shelf From a series made by Rector’s office
  • http://www.ntnu.no/research/ceer
  • Energy and the environment – because energy technology must reflect the limitations of the environment. Research is being intensified in smart and energy-efficient buildings and environmentally friendly uses of natural gas. Medical technology – because health is one of our greatest challenges. The main focus is on image-based diagnostics and ultrasound intervention, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and medical biotechnology. Materials technology – because materials are the basis for all new technology. Focus areas are light metal alloys and functional materials. Marine and maritime technology – because the ocean holds vast amounts of underused resources. Intense focus on marine technology and marine biology resources. Information and Communications Technology – because humans need to communicate. Research is carried out on four levels: Discipline-specific. Interdisciplinary research in fields such as speech technology, with research teams from telecommunications, computer science and linguistics. Integrated areas with a broad academic base, such as human-machine communication. Integrated projects that draw on resources from a large part of the ICT community. Globalization – because the forces of globalization permeate our society and are significant for all areas of society; no area remains unaffected. It touches everyday life on all levels, from the individual to the state, up to and including the multinational. Globalization means that cultural and social boundaries at all levels become less significant in governing human interactions. As a result, globalization research is highly relevant and significant for both the public and private sectors. Globalization affects most scientific disciplines in fundamental ways. The area includes three overarching interdisciplinary themes; Historical Processes, Ethical Dilemmas, and Economic Conditions. Photos, from top: 1) GEMINI Vol 1, 2003: Fuel cell developed at SINTEF Materials and Chemistry. Photo: Sintef Media. 2) Alginate beads formed by dripping sodium alginate droplets into a solution with calsium chloride. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info 3) Graphics from the internet 4) Ship’s bow. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/Norges fiskeriforskningsråd (1992) 5) Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS). Photo and montage: Gorm Kallestad/NTNU Info. 6) Puzzle. Photo: NTNU Info.
  • Globalization is a research area in which NTNU has potential for outstanding research. The Globalization Programme aims at bringing out this potential by putting researchers from different corners of the institution and of the world together to examine the issues and challenges of an increasingly globalized world. http://www.ntnu.no/global
  • For more information, see “Rapport og planer 2006–2007” (the report to the Ministry of Education and Research) kap. 3.2.1, page 30. Photo: Ole D. Hesledalen/NTNU Info
  • See http://www.sffe.no/index_e.php and http://www.ntnu.no/research/energy-environment See chap. 2.1 s. 4-5 and chap. 3.2.1 in the annual report ”Rapport og planer 2007-2008” (in Norwegian only) ESFRI = European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures. The goal is to be included in the European infrastructure that for a large part decides who gets financial backing. (See ”Rapport og planer 2007-2008” kap. 2.1.1, p. 4). The Engineering Education Observatory evaluated both the commitment of the university to education in sustainability at the undergraduate level and the availability of Master and PhD level specialization. With its long track record of courses for engineering students and the MSc and PhD programmes in industrial ecology, NTNU comes out on top, narrowly beating its closest rival, the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm. Download the report here. The report was commissioned by the rectors of the Technical Universities of Catalonia and Delft, Chalmers University, and the Alliance for Global Sustainability. See the report on https://www.upc.edu/eesd-observatory/why/reports/EESD%20Observatory2006%20Report.pdf See press release (in Norwegian) at http://www.ntnu.no/aktuelt/pressemeldinger/aasland
  • See chapter 4.6 in “Budget Document for NTNU 2005-2007” (table 3.5) and appendix 1, section 5.1 in “Budget Document for NTNU 2003–2005” and the same document for 2004–2006, and report to the Ministry of Education and Research (2006-2007) ch. 2.1. and 3.2.4.
  • NTNU and SINTEF operate special laboratories, field stations and academic collections as a national resource for education and research. The equipment, buildings and knowledge are a result of decades of work and financing. A more extensive list can be found at: http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/research/research_lab?menuSectionId=9791 Photographs, from top: 1: In the Ocean Basin Laboratory at the Marine Technology Centre, 1996. Photo: Cathrine Dillner Hagen/NTNU Info. 2: Professor Terje K. Lien at a robotic line for the assembly of a door lock system, Department of Production and Quality Engineering. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. 3: From the Materials Technology Laboratories, 1995. Photo: Jens Søraa/NTNU Info. 4:Nanotechnology: Professor Thomas Tybell, Dept. of Electronics and telecommunications, NTNU, checks the temperature in a vacuum chamber using an optical thermometer. Behind him are (from left) ass. professor Turid Worren, Dept. of Physics and PhD student Kjersti Midtbø. The chamber is used to produce nanosized material films through bombardment with ionized gases. Ca. 2003. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info .
  • The selection reflects NTNU’s broad range of experimental facilities. The pictures to the right are from other NTNU laboratories than those listed, clockwise from top left: Metallurgy Lab. Hydroforming. Department of Materials Technology and Electrochemistry. (2002). Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Spark-over in an insulator at a voltage of about 200kV in a laboratory at NTNU’s Department of Electrical Power Engineering. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info (2002) Structure for the study of CO2 removal at the Reactor Technology research group, in the Department of Chemical Engineering. Photo: G.K./NTNU Info. (2002) Postgraduate student Mona Stensvik, a member of the Separation Technology Research Group, examines newly separated crystals under a microscope in the crystallisation lab at NTNU’s Department of Chemical Engineering. Photo: G.K./NTNU Info. (2002) Propeller tested in the Cavitation Laboratory. Photo: Knut Arne Hegstad/Dept. of Marine Technology, NTNU. Antenna-testing laboratory. Echo-free room with an antenna tower for testing antenna types, associated with NTNU’s Radio Systems research group in the Department of Telecommunications. Photo: G.K./NTNU Info. (2002) Virtual Reality Lab: Students in a cave where seismic data are projected three-dimensionally. Photo: Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics, NTNU. A more extensive overview is available at: www.ntnu.no/forskning/programmer/
  • NTNU and SINTEF operate special laboratories, field stations and academic collections as a national resource for education and research. The equipment, buildings and knowledge are a result of decades of work and financing. A more extensive list can be found at: www.ntnu.no/forskning/programmer
  • Numbers from the database ”Frida” (log in) - /Rapporter/Institusjon/Kategorifordeling for NTNU 2008, with subcategories. The term ”Scientific presentations”’ includes oral presentations often being published in conference proceedings. ” Books” include: Scientific anthologies (128); Scientific monographs (40);  Scientific commentary editions (3); Non-fiction professional books (35); Encyclopedias (0); Reference books (2);   Popular science books (15); Textbooks (17). ” Part of book/report” include: Chapter/article (1029); Encyclopedic article (4); Other (24). ” Art and museum exhibitions” include: Museum exhibition (24); Architect exhibition (1); Art show (25); Web show (4); Other (37). ” Artistic productions” include: Architect drawings (5); Art and picture material (5). ” Products” include: Digital educational material (2); Model (architecture) (0); Multi media products (3);  Music – recorded products (0); Software (3); Databases (0); Sound materiale (7); Other products (12).
  • Top: Studentersamfundet - the Student Union Building, with the main administration building of the NTNU in the background, seen from the pedestrian bridge over the river, summer 2005. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info. Left: Auditorium R7 with coloured fluorescent lights in the ceiling, Natural Science Building, spring 2000. Photo: Kenneth Aar/NTNU Info. Middle: Associate Professor Sverre H. Torp, from the Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s and Women’s Health. Second year students in medicine have a class in anatomy. What does the brain look like – on the inside? From left: Marte Syvertsen, Sverre Torp, Marte Skoglund and Bergljot Dahl. Faculty of Medicine. From "Lærerliv”, a picture series on the life of lecturers at NTNU September 2002. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Right: From a class at the Department of History and Classical Studies, January 2002. Photo: G.K./NTNU Info.
  • From http://www.nokut.no/sw473.asp Universities and specialized institutions at university level: Norwegian University of Life Sciences Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Oslo School of Architecture The Norwegian Academy of Music The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science The University Centre on Svalbard University of Bergen University of Oslo University of Stavanger University of Tromsø UniK - University Graduate Center The Norwegian Lutheran School of Theology (from 1 Jan 2005) University of Agder (from Sept 1 2007) (see also http://www.uib.no/siu/ur/bros-eng.htm)
  • The number of applicants is taken from NTNU Table 1 in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research. (See also the table “Studentrapporter/Søknadstall” for NTNU at Database for Higher Education (DBH), dbh.nsd.uib.no). Note that the number of applications is much higher than the number of applicants, because a single applicant may apply to several study programmes at the same time. (See also Database for Higher Education (DBH), at www.nsd.uib.no) The total number of applications is the sum of the applications filed with the Universities and Colleges Admission Service (UCAS), which number approximately 40,000, and the applications that for various reasons (see below) come directly to NTNU. The number of primary applicants (applicants that have NTNU listed as their first choice) is taken from NUCAS (www.samordnaopptak.no), and from the NTNU annual press release in April/May. The term “primary applicants” only applies to those applicants coordinated through UCAS. The number does not include those applying directly to NTNU for a higher degree, for the cand.psychol. degree in psychology, applicants for the spring semester and applicants to The Trondheim Academy of Fine Art and performance studies in music (as a result of required entrance exams for admission). Approximately 6,900 were accepted (see above mentioned Table 1). The difference of approximately 3,000 between those accepted and the number of graduates is explained thusly: Those who graduate have completed a course of study here, for example in technology (MSc). Among those accepted, many will not complete a course of study for a lower/higher degree at NTNU. Some do not show up despite accepting a place at the university, some leave after a few weeks/months, some are accepted into studies of a shorter duration on the basis of main studies at another university, and some only follow individual courses as part of their continuing education. The admissions process may be divided into five stages: 1) Submitted applications; 2) Qualified applicants; 3) Study offers; 4) Acceptance of the study offer; 5) Arriving at the university and paying the semester fee. (Numbers for categories 1) and 5) are found in DBH.) The number of registered students is taken from Table 1 in in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research. The number of degrees awarded is taken from said Table 1 in the annual report (2008-2009) to the Ministry of Education and Research, and the number of PhDs awarded from NTNU Table 5 in the same document. The number of programmes of study is taken from http://www.ntnu.no/studier . The list of international Master’s programmes from http://www.ntnu.no/studier/internasjonalemasterprogram The number of courses is calculated from the list in http://www.ntnu.no/studier/emner Photo: Cathrine Dillner Hagen/NTNU Info .
  • NTNU has ten areas of study . All areas are approved by the Ministry of Education and Research: Mathematics and scientific studies (science), arts (humanities), social sciences, technology, medicine, architecture, psychology, performing music, fine art, and practical-pedagogical studies. (The Examen philosophicum is in addition to this.) The hierarchical terminology is 1) Area of study, 2) Programme of study (both for lower and higher degrees, and for doctoral studies), and 3) Course (which is the basic unit that awards credits). Photo: Cathrine Dillner Hagen/NTNU Info. For more on terminology, see http://www.uhr.no/utdanning/terminologi (“termbase”) See also www.ntnu.no/intersek/english_matters/ (”UHR´s Termbase - translations of educational terms”)
  • In NTNU’s degree structure, students can choose between two pathways: 3+2: Students taking the arts, social sciences and natural sciences can chose different programmes of study that can be combined in a bachelor’s degree (BA, BSc) – 3 years. This can be combined with a subsequent 2-year master’s degree (MA, MSc., MPhil.) Integrated degree: The other path is an integrated degree such as a Master of Science (Norwegian: Mastergrad i teknologi (previously sivilingeniør and/or sivilarkitekt)). This takes 5 years to complete. Or a professional degree in medicine or psychology (these degrees are both 6 year programmes). A doctoral degree (at NTNU, usually a PhD) builds on a master’s degree, and normally takes 3 years. The doctoral programmes are structured like the master’s programmes. It is also possible to choose a two-year master’s degree building on three years of technological or architectural studies. There is a separate medical research programme. This education is centred around medical studies. One can also choose the practical-pedagogical teacher education as a one-year addition to: - A five-year master’s degree - A three-year bachelor’s degree - 180 credits Teacher education may also be taken as a two-year addition to general education and vocational training (part-time). NTNU is the second largest institution in Norway for teacher education. (Graphics from http://www.studier.ntnu.no/?id=2 .)
  • See http://www.ntnu.no/financing and for Admission requirements: http://www.ntnu.no/studies/degree_students/admissions
  • The numbers for higher degrees include a small number of the so-called “International master’s degrees” awarded at NTNU, where all lectures are in English. Source: NTNU Table 4 in the annual report “Rapport og planer 2008 – 2009” submitted to the Ministry of Education and Research.
  • See http://www.ntnu.no/international/master and chap. 3.1.2, p. 20-23 in ”Rapport og planer 2008 – 2009”. NUFU = National Program for Research and Education financed by NORAD, and managed by the Norwegian Association of Higher Education Institutions. NOMA = NORAD’s program for master studies. The Erasmus Mundus programme is a cooperation and mobility programme in the field of higher education which promotes the European Union as a centre of excellence in learning around the world. It supports European top-quality master’s courses and enhances the visibility and attractiveness of European higher education in third countries. It also provides EU-funded scholarships for third country nationals participating in these master’s courses, as well as scholarships for EU-nationals studying at partner universities throughout the world. Erasmus Mundus External Cooperation Window is coordinated by the University of Lund, Sweden, for cooperation with universities in India; encompassing 12 European universities and 8 Indian universities. IAESTE is the International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience. BEST is the Board of European Students of Technology
  • Nordic Five Tech (N5T) is an exclusive strategic alliance of the leading technical universities in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden with the scope of utilizing shared and complementary strengths within education, research and innovation. http://www.nordicfivetech.org/
  • www.videre.ntnu.no Information from slide 27 in the Norwegian edition of the slide series See chap. 3.3.2 in the document “Rapport og planer 2007 – 2008” and chap. 3.1.2 in “Rapport og planer 2008-2009” (in Norwegian)
  • Information from slide 28 in the Norwegian edition of the slide series Library units: Dragvoll Library Marine Technology Library, Tyholt Library for Architecture, Civil Engineering and Product Design, Gløshaugen Valgrinda Library Trondheim Academy of Fine Art Library, Innherredsveien Music Library, Olavskvartalet Gunnerus Library, Kalvskinnet Medical Library, St. Olavs Hospital Natural Science Library, Gløshaugen Main Library for Technology, Gløshaugen Dora Library
  • The number of students at NTNU, Sør-Trøndelag University College and other local institutions of higher learning totals about 30,000 (according to the Annual Report 2004 for the Student Welfare Organization of Trondheim) Trondheim’s population was 169,257 January 1, 2009, with the number of households at approximately 70,000. In addition to residents, about 23,000 students live in the city, but formally reside in their respective home counties. To estimate the actual population for Trondheim, we must also subtract about 2,000 students whose registered address is Trondheim, but who live and study elsewhere. The actual resident population can thus be estimated at approximately 180,000. There are no exact numbers for the residences of the student population, so the estimates are approximate. See www.trondheim.kommune.no -> om kommunen/fakta og tall/befolkningsstatistikk og www.trondheim.com ->om Trondheim/Trondheim i dag. NTNUI = The student sport association at NTNU (the Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Number of members in NTNUI from http://www.ntnui.no/main/Page/43.xhtml. Photos from left: 1) Matriculation/Enrolment event Aug 18 2005, on the Gløshaugen campus. Banners for the biannual event ”UKA” (Student week). Photo: Geir Mogen/NTNU Info. 2) Preparations for the coming rowing competition on Nidelva through central parts of Trondheim. July 2005. Photo: Håvard Hamnaberg/NTNU Info. 3) From the Matriculation/Enrolment event in August 2006. Performance by the Dance group of the students sporting assocuation NTNUI. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info.
  • From NTNU Alumni, April 2009 Contact: alumni@ntnu.no www.ntnu.no/alumni Photo: Gorm Kallestad, Scanpix/NTNU Info
  • Information from slide 48 in the Norwegian edition (This slide is made in cooperation with NTNU’s Unit for Research and Innovation.)
  • See http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/business See also annual report from NTNU TTO at http://www.tto.ntnu.no/ Photo: NTNU Info/Ole D. Hesledalen.
  • www.ntnu.no/business See also annual report from NTNU TTO at http://www.tto.ntnu.no/ Photo: NTNU Info/Ole D. Hesledalen.
  • Information from slide 49 in the Norwegian edition, from NTNU TTO Observe the vital role of government agencies for creating a suitable framework for these processes.
  • www.tto.ntnu.no At the turn of the year 2008/2009 NTNU TTO had 21 employees. NTNU has authorised TTO sole rights to handle the commercialisation of research results from NTNU. Photo: NTNU TTO
  • http://www.ig.ntnu.no/ Gløshaugen Innovation Center is primarily a service for students, faculty, employees or others with ties to NTNU or SINTEF, aiming to set up businesses founded on interesting R&D-based ideas with a commercial potential.
  • The number of projects taken from the “Maconomy”-system of the Financial Division, April 2009. Amount “From industry” : From Table 4.1.1 Note 1 in the appendix of tables of “Rapport og planer 2008-2009” (the annual Report to the Ministry of Education and Research). Industrial R&D agreements from a list obtained through the NTNU Main Archives, Jan. 2005. The agreement with Shell, see Universitetsavisa 24 May 2004; with Rolls-Royce, see UA 9 May 2005; with Norsk Hydro, see UA 20 May 2005. Jotun and Borregaard, see NOBIPOL at Dept. of Biotechnology http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/aboutntnu/facultiesanddepartments/nt/biot?menuSectionId=6004 Number of adjunct professors, see employment code 9301 for ”Tilsatte” in www.dbh.uib.no
  • IAESTE = The International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience. Examples of agreements between faculty and industry organisations can be found at the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Technology (the chemical industry) and the Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology (the construction industry). NTNU Alumni was established 2005, and had its first year of routine operation in 2006/2007. www.ntnu.no/alumni/ Access Mid-Norway is a Norwegian association formed to attract international and Norwegian companies to set up business in the region of Mid-Norway. The access to world leading research and education institutions and an advanced and well-functioning system for education of highly qualified manpower is unique for this region. Access Mid-Norway will guarantee the company access to all institutions in the region providing education in the field of expertise of the company and the access to professional recruitment agencies with a commitment to recruit skilled workers to the Mid-Norway region through their international networks.
  • http://ekstranett.innovasjonnorge.no/templates/Page_Meta____56522.aspx The Minister of Trade and Industry together with the Minister of Local Government and Regional Development announced on 27 April 2006 that six Industrial areas in Norway have been selected as Norwegian Centres of Expertise. These are NCE Maritime at the West Coast, NCE Microsystems in the Region of Vestfold, NCE Systems Engineering at Kongsberg, NCE Subsea in the region of Hordaland, Instrumental hub in the region of Trøndelag and finally NCE at Raufoss. The new Centres of Expertise are meant to increase the effort to improve regional innovation throughout the whole country. The NCE are to contribute to new commercial activities and development of new ideas and technologies. The NCE programme has been developed by SIVA, (the Industrial Development Corporation in Norway), the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. These are also the three organizations that made the selection of the six Centres of Expertise. See http://www.nce.no/ The selection was based on the following criteria: * companies with international presence and great potential to improve further growth based on innovation * increased cooperation * internationalization * research and development
  • Top: Science Festival 17 Sept 2004. MINILABORANTS: Vegard and Amanda are both in fourth grade schoolchildren. The test tube has been used to extract the DNA from an onion. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info. Bottom, from left: 1) Christmas Concert in the Hall of the Main Building at NTNU, 21 Dec 2005. Sigmund Tvete Vik and Hans Petter Mæhle, violin, Vegar Snøfugl, bratsj, Torleif Holm, cello. Photo: NTNU Info/Anja Tjelflaat. 2) Gemini cover, last issue spring 2008 (in Norwegian). 3) Museum of Natural History and Archaeology Chinese exhibition, autumn 2005. Photo: Arne Asphjell/NTNU Info. 4) Balloon release at the opening of The Science Festival, 26 September 2002. Photo: NTNU Info/Rune Petter Ness. 5) From “Researchers’ Night”, and evening arrangement for secondary school students, 26 Sept.2005. Photo: Nina E. Tveter/NTNU Info.
  • From chap. 3.3 ”Rapport og planer 2008 – 2009”, Table 7 p. 32, and the Frida system for NTNu for 2008. ” Contributions … in the media” include chronicles, letters to the editor, interviews and others.
  • Phtotos: The Museum of Natural History and Archaeology at NTNU
  • From the Science Centre and www.viten.ntnu.no, april 2009 Picture: Orbitron at the Science Centre, 2003. Photo: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info
  • [Rector = Vice-Chancellor (UK) = President (USA)] The faculties and their departments: Architecture and Fine Art: Fine Art – The Trondheim Academy of Fine Art; Architectural Design, Form and Colour Studies; Architectural Design and Management; Architectural Design, History and Technology; Urban Design and Planning. Humanities: Archaeology and Religious Studies; Art and Media Studies; History and Classical Studies; Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies; Language and Communication Studies; Modern Foreign Languages; Music, Philosophy; Scandinavian Studies and Comparative Literature. Information Technology, Mathematics and Electrical Engineering: Computer and Information Science; Electrical Power Engineering; Electronics and Telecommunications; Engineering Cybernetics; Mathematical Sciences; Telematics. Engineering Science and Technology: Civil and Transport Engineering; Energy and Process Engineering; Engineering Design and Materials; Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering; Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering; Marine Technology; Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics; Product Design; Production and Quality Engineering; Structural Engineering. Medicine: Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine; Circulation and Medical Imaging; Neuroscience; Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health; Public Health and General Practice. Natural Sciences and Technology: Biology; Biotechnology; Chemical Engineering; Chemistry; Materials Technology; Physics. Social Sciences and Technology Management: Economics; Education; Geography; Industrial Economics and Technology Management; Programme for Teacher Education; Psychology; Social Anthropology; Social Work and Health Science; Sociology and Political Science; Human Movement Science Programme, Lifelong Learning Centre. There is also: Museum of Natural History and Archaeology. Sections: Archaeology and Cultural History; Archaeometry; External Services; Natural History. At the Faculty for Socials Sciences and Technology Management there is also Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB).
  • The Board is the highest governing body at NTNU. The Board makes decisions on issues of principal importance. The Board is responsible for activities at the university and for ensuring that the university operates within the framework and guidelines stipulated by the Ministry of Education and Research, and the Storting. The Board decides the strategies, objectives and the expected results from NTNU. It also presents the accounts, financial statements and budget proposals. The Board appoints the Rector. [Rector = Vice-Chancellor (UK) = President (USA)] The Rector is the Secretary to the Board and the head of academic and administrative affairs at NTNU. The Rector reports to the Board and represents NTNU on a day-to-day basis. The Rector is responsible for communications between the Board and the outside world regarding decisions passed by the Board. There are 11 members of the Board . Three are from the academic staff at NTNU, one represents academic or research staff without tenure, one represents the technical and administrative staff. There are also two student members of the Board and four external representatives (all from outside the university). All members are elected for a four-year term, except for the two student representatives and the representative for academic or research staff without tenure who are elected for one year. Members of the Board at present (until 1 august 2010) are: External repr.: Marit Arnstad (Chair), Karin Röding, Ådne Cappelen , Morten Loktu . Tenured academic staff: Professor Bjarne Foss , Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics; ass. professor Anne Kristine Børresen , Dept. of History and Classical Studies; professor Helge Holden, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences. Academic or research staff without tenure: Haaken Annfelt Moe , Dept. of Matematical Sciences. Technical/administrative staff: Kristin Dæhli . Students: Julia Iablokova, Morten Olimb. (see http://www.ntnu.no/aboutntnu/board) Photos of Arnstad, Dæhli: Gorm Kallestad, Scanpix/NTNU Info Photo of R öding: Camilla Svensk, Karolinska, Inst. Photo of Digernes: Synnøve Ressem/NTNU Info Photos of Foss, Loktu: Rune Petter Ness/NTNU Info Photo of Cappelen: Jon Olav Folsland/SSB Photo of Børresen: Lars Gisnås, Trondheim/NTNU Photos of Holden, Annfelt Moe, Iablokova, Olimb: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info
  • From NTNU’s strategic document “Constructive, Creative and Critical” See http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/aboutntnu/aboutntnu_strategy?menuSectionId=9765
  • From NTNU’s strategic document “Constructive, Creative and Critical” http://www.ntnu.no/portal/page/portal/eksternwebEN/aboutntnu -> Strategy and objectives Picture: The Foucault pendulum in the Natural Sciences Building . Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info
  • From NTNU’s strategic document ”NTNU 2020 – Internationally Outstanding” http://www.ntnu.no/eksternweb/multimedia/archive/00011/strategidokument-202_11952a.pdf Picture: The monodisperse beads invented by professor John Ugelstad, Trondheim. Photo: Dept. of Chemical Engineering, NTNU.
  • From NTNU’s strategy dokument ”NTNU Internationally Outstanding 2020” http://www.ntnu.no/eksternweb/multimedia/archive/00013/strategic_plan_ntnu__13392a.pdf Picture: Experimental melting of iron ore at the Department of Materials Technology . Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info
  • Left: The assembly hall in the main administration building, a Saturday morning in May 2000. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info. Top right: Dragvoll campus with “the Street”, 1996. Photo: Cathrine Dillner Hagen/NTNU SA. Bottom right: From a conference in May 1999. The atrium in the Electrical Engineering Buildings is used as a recreational area. Photo: Mentz Indergaard/NTNU Info.
  • NTNU

    1. 1. Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), May 2009 – Research – Education – Innovation – Dissemination – Organization – Objectives
    2. 4. NTNU key figures (2008) <ul><li>53 departments in 7 faculties </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU Library </li></ul><ul><li>Museum of Natural History and Archaeology </li></ul><ul><li>63 600 student applications – more than 10 000 have NTNU as first choice </li></ul><ul><li>20 000 registered students, 6900 admitted </li></ul><ul><li>2 850 degrees awarded </li></ul><ul><li>314 doctoral degrees awarded </li></ul><ul><li>4 500 person-years </li></ul><ul><li>2 700 employed in education and research; 557 professors </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: EUR 550 million </li></ul><ul><li>560 000 m 2 owned and rented premises </li></ul>FACTS
    3. 5. Sources of revenue (EUR million) FACTS FACTS
    4. 6. NTNU in Trondheim FACTS
    5. 8. Trondheim’s academic history <ul><li>1217 Schola Cathedralis Nidarosiensis </li></ul><ul><li>1760 Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters </li></ul><ul><li>1910 Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH) </li></ul><ul><li>1922 Norwegian Teacher Training College </li></ul><ul><li>1968 University of Trondheim </li></ul><ul><li>1973 Music Conservatory in Trondheim </li></ul><ul><li>1974 Section for Medicine (From 1984: Faculty of Medicine) </li></ul><ul><li>1979 Trondheim Academy of Fine Art </li></ul><ul><li>1984 College of Arts and Science </li></ul><ul><li>1996 Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) </li></ul><ul><li>2010 Celebration of Trondheim’s 250 years as an academic city </li></ul>FACTS
    6. 10. Research – a core activity <ul><li>NTNU’s fundamental strengths: </li></ul><ul><li>Technology and the natural sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Broad academic base </li></ul><ul><li>Interdisciplinary collaboration </li></ul>R & D
    7. 11. Research – I <ul><li>314 doctoral degrees awarded in 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>More than 2000 research projects </li></ul><ul><li>62 EU projects from 2002 – 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>30 projects in the EU’s 7th Framework Programmes </li></ul><ul><li>More than 320 cooperative agreements with universities globally </li></ul>R & D
    8. 12. Research – II <ul><li>26 % of the faculty are foreign nationals </li></ul><ul><li>34 % of PhD candidates are foreign nationals </li></ul><ul><li>International cooperation for research infrastructure in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) and research in the arctic, at Svalbard </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU has joined the ”European Charter for Researchers” and ”Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers” </li></ul>R & D
    9. 13. PhD programmes at NTNU <ul><li>1867 PhD candidates in NTNU’s graduate school (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>44 doctoral programmes </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate schools where NTNU is the responsible coordinator: </li></ul><ul><li>- Educational Governance </li></ul><ul><li>- Medical Imaging </li></ul><ul><li>- Text – Picture – Sound – Space </li></ul><ul><li>- Language and linguistics </li></ul><ul><li>- Nordic Graduate School in Gender Studies </li></ul><ul><li>- Nanotechnology for Microsystems </li></ul>R & D
    10. 14. Cooperation with <ul><li>SINTEF is one of Europe’s largest independent research organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: EUR 325 million/year (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>2150 staff from 64 different countries </li></ul><ul><li>Contract research in technology, natural sciences, medicine and social sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Joint strategy with NTNU </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperates with NTNU in terms of staff, equipment, laboratories and science communication </li></ul><ul><li>19 Gemini Centres for joint NTNU – SINTEF R&D </li></ul>R & D
    11. 15. Strategic focus – I <ul><li>Three Centres of Excellence </li></ul><ul><li>Three Centres of Research-based Innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Six thematic strategic areas </li></ul><ul><li>Interdisciplinary research activities – examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gas Technology Centre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NTNU Nanolab </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nordic Five Tech – Strategic alliance of the leading Nordic technical universities </li></ul>R & D
    12. 16. Centres of Excellence <ul><li>Centre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems – Q2S </li></ul><ul><li>Centre for the Biology of Memory – CBM </li></ul><ul><li>Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures – CESOS </li></ul><ul><li>Duration: 2003 – 2013 </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: EUR 11 million annually </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by the Research Council of Norway, NTNU and industry </li></ul>Nationally selected research groups at NTNU of high international standard that are governed by uniform management principles. R & D
    13. 17. Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems (Q2S) <ul><li>Audio over IP Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Multimedia over IP Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Interdomain and Overlay Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Intradomain Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Trustworthy Multiparty Interactions in Dynamic Networking Environments </li></ul><ul><li>A total of 35 professors, postdocs and PhD candidates. </li></ul><ul><li>Financed by the Research Council of Norway, </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU and UNINETT. Supported by Telenor R&D </li></ul>FAKTA R & D
    14. 18. Centre for the Biology of Memory <ul><li>Research on brain and memory </li></ul><ul><li>Neural mapping of the spatial environment </li></ul><ul><li>Named Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>One of 15 Kavli institutes in the world, others at Harvard, Yale, MiT, Stanford and Cambridge </li></ul><ul><li>A total of 36 professors, visiting professors, postdocs, graduate students and associated researchers. Co-funded by NTNU and the Research Council of Norway. </li></ul>FAKTA R & D
    15. 19. CESOS – Ships and Ocean Structures <ul><li>Design and operation of the future’s </li></ul><ul><li>ships and ocean structures: </li></ul><ul><li>Marine hydrodynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Structural mechanics </li></ul><ul><li>Automatic control </li></ul>FAKTA R & D Oil and gas operations in deep water challenge mooring systems and risers. 6 key persons, 11 postdocs, 32 PhDs in progress (2008). A total of 40 research man-years, including visiting professors and associated personnel. Co-funded by NTNU and the Research Council of Norway
    16. 20. Centres for Research-based Innovation <ul><li>Medical Imaging Laboratory for Innovative Future Healthcare (MI Lab) </li></ul><ul><li>Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) </li></ul><ul><li>Centre for Integrated Operations in the Petroleum Industry (CIO) </li></ul><ul><li>Duration: 2007–2015. </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: Min. EUR 7.5 mill. annually. </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by the Research Council, NTNU and industry. </li></ul>R & D Research-intensive enterprises allied with prominent research groups at NTNU
    17. 21. Medical Imaging (MILab) <ul><li>EUR 30 million for 2007 – 2014 </li></ul><ul><li>Partners: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>R&D: St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital and SINTEF </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Industry: GE Vingmed Ultrasound; FAST; Medistim; Sonowand; Odetect; Nordic Neurolab; CorTechs Labs; ASD </li></ul></ul>Patients: Improved quality of life Healthcare: Cost efficient solutions Industry: New products and applications Society: Halting the increase in health care expenses Intra operative assessment by ultrasound in cardiovascular surgery R & D
    18. 22. SIMlab – Structural Impact Laboratory Computer simulation of how aluminium structures behave in collisions  Goal for safer and lighter cars: 100 kg of aluminium to replace 200 kg of steel. In the USA this would save 18 bn litres of petrol/year SIMlab partners: BMW, Audi, Renault At present: 40 million people injured and 1.2 million killed globally on the roads each year. R & D
    19. 23. Centre for Integrated Operations in the Petroleum Industry FAKTA R & D Every 1% of extra oil recovered on the NCS = USD 50 billion p.a. Partners: Shell, Total, StatoilHydro, Conoco-Phillips, Stanford U., Delft Technical U., SINTEF, Research Council of Norway Onshore operation and control room.
    20. 24. Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME) <ul><li>Top-level R&D groups cooperating with innovative industries Established by the Research Council of Norway 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>FME Centre hosted by NTNU: </li></ul><ul><li>Research Centre on Zero Emission Buildings – ZEB </li></ul><ul><li>FME Centres with NTNU as active partner: </li></ul><ul><li>BIGCCS – International CCS Research Centre </li></ul><ul><li>Centre for Environmental Design of Renewable Energy (CEDREN) </li></ul><ul><li>Bioenergy Innovation Centre (CenBio) </li></ul><ul><li>Research Centre for Offshore Wind Technology </li></ul><ul><li>The Norwegian Research Centre for Solar Cell Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Duration: 2009–2017, based on evaluations </li></ul>R & D
    21. 25. NTNU’s six strategic areas <ul><li>Energy and Petroleum – Resources and Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Materials Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Marine and Maritime Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Information and Communication Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Globalization </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: </li></ul><ul><li>Seed funding (EUR 0.5–1.5 million per area) </li></ul><ul><li>Funding for PhD candidates </li></ul>R & D
    22. 26. Globalization <ul><li>Three focus areas: </li></ul><ul><li>Global Production and Communication </li></ul><ul><li>War, Conflict and Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Intercultural Dynamics: Communication, Responsibility and Development </li></ul>R & D
    23. 27. Strategic focus – II Interdisciplinary research <ul><li>Gas Technology Research & Education </li></ul><ul><li>Nanotechnology – NTNU Nanolab </li></ul><ul><li>The Nord-Trøndelag County Health Study (HUNT) </li></ul><ul><li>Functional Genome Research (FUGE) </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial Ecology (IndEcol) </li></ul>R & D
    24. 28. Energy and environment <ul><li>Centre for Renewable Energy, with SINTEF Energy. 200 researchers and 55 PhD candidates </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU coordinator for Norwegian R&D proposal to ESFRI on energy and the disposal of CO 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Bilateral agreement with MIT on Energy R&D, supported by StatoilHydro </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation with Japanese universities in Kyoto International Forum for Environment and Energy </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU ranked No.1 in Engineering Education for Sustainability in Europe </li></ul>R & D
    25. 29. International research networks <ul><li>NTNU is an attractive partner for the global academic community </li></ul><ul><li>Research and education cooperation with about 200 universities worldwide. </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU is represented in key international research organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU participates with other Norwegian academic groups in Athens, Rome, Paris, St. Petersburg and on Spitsbergen. </li></ul>R & D
    26. 30. Major laboratories <ul><li>NTNU and SINTEF share more </li></ul><ul><li>than 100 research laboratories: </li></ul><ul><li>Hydrodynamic/marine technology laboratories (Towing Tank and Ocean Basin Laboratory) </li></ul><ul><li>Machine Tools Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Materials and Engineering Laboratories </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratories for semiconductor materials </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU Nanolab – Nanotechnology </li></ul>R & D
    27. 31. Laboratories – examples <ul><li>Daylight Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Phonetics Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Marine Cybernetics Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Norwegian Biopolymer Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Ultrasound Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Magnetic Resonance Centre </li></ul><ul><li>Structural Impact Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Energy and Indoor Environment Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>ENGAS Lab. (Gas Technology Centre) </li></ul><ul><li>Waterpower Laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering Lab. </li></ul><ul><li>Trondheim Marine Systems Research Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Ugelstad Laboratory </li></ul>R & D
    28. 32. SINTEF/NTNU laboratories – Tyholt FAKTA R & D Hydrodynamic/marine technology labs (Towing Tank and Ocean Basin Laboratory)
    29. 33. Academic output from NTNU in 2008 R & D Scientific papers and review articles 2 074 Scientific presentations 3 769 Books 247 Reports and theses 744 Book chapters/reports 1 098 Artistic productions and art and museum exhibitions 88 Products 52
    30. 34. NTNU, May 2008 EDUCATION
    31. 35. University-level institutions in Norway 1) NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology 2) Norwegian University of Life Sciences 3) University of Oslo 4) Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration 5) Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education 6) The Oslo School of Architecture and Design 7) The Norwegian Academy of Music 8) The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science 9) UniK – University Graduate Centre, Kjeller 10) The Norwegian Lutheran School of Theology 11) University of Stavanger 12) University of Bergen 13) University of Tromsø 14) The University Centre on Svalbard 15) University of Agder 1 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 11 12 13 14 EDUCATION 15
    32. 36. Education – 2008 <ul><li>63 600 student applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- more than 10 000 have NTNU as their first choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- 6 900 students were admitted </li></ul></ul><ul><li>20 000 registered students </li></ul><ul><li>2 850 degrees awarded </li></ul><ul><li>314 doctoral degrees awarded </li></ul><ul><li>150 study programmes </li></ul><ul><li>30 international Master’s programmes </li></ul><ul><li>3 000 courses </li></ul>EDUCATION
    33. 37. Ten areas of study <ul><li>Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Humanities </li></ul><ul><li>Science </li></ul><ul><li>Social Sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Medicine </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology </li></ul><ul><li>Fine Art </li></ul><ul><li>Music </li></ul><ul><li>Practical-pedagogical Education </li></ul>EDUCATION
    34. 38. Degree structure (years of study) EDUCATION Humanities Fine Art Science Social Sciences Technology Architecture Medicine Clinical Psychology Music Teacher education
    35. 39. Education for international students <ul><li>No tuition fees </li></ul><ul><li>Must document a minimum of NOK 85 000 (EUR 10 000) per year to cover living expenses </li></ul><ul><li>Categories of international students at NTNU: </li></ul><ul><li>Exchange students </li></ul><ul><li>Degree-seeking students (undergraduate and graduate) </li></ul><ul><li>International master's programme students </li></ul><ul><li>Visiting/non-degree students </li></ul><ul><li>NUFU students </li></ul><ul><li>PhD candidates </li></ul>EDUCATION
    36. 40. Degrees awarded in 2008 EDUCATION Lower degrees Higher degrees Technology [not offered] 1 098 Social Sciences 252 333 Humanities 229 176 Science 104 123 Architecture [not offered] 90 Medicine [not offered] 117 Psychology [not offered] 55 Fine Art 13 7 Performing Music 20 6 Teacher Training Diploma 212 [not offered] TOTAL 830 2 029
    37. 41. Internationalization – studies (2008) <ul><li>36 international (English) master’s programmes </li></ul><ul><li>3 master’s programmes under Erasmus Mundus </li></ul><ul><li>584 NTNU students studied abroad </li></ul><ul><li>866 students from abroad to NTNU </li></ul><ul><li>Joined the Erasmus Mundus – External Cooperation Window </li></ul><ul><li>Study centres in Caen, York, Kiel, St. Petersburg and Fudan </li></ul><ul><li>IAESTE and BEST (student programmes) </li></ul>EDUCATION
    38. 42. Nordic Five Tech – a strategic alliance EDUCATION
    39. 43. NTNU Centre for Continuing and Professional Development (2008) <ul><li>organizes NTNU’s further and continuing education . </li></ul><ul><li>4562 participants at conferences </li></ul><ul><li>6695 in further and continuing education (total figures) </li></ul><ul><li>163 credit-based courses completed (= 512 years of study) </li></ul><ul><li>Seven master’s programmes offered, based on work experience </li></ul><ul><li>Provides expertise and industrial contacts </li></ul>EDUCATION
    40. 44. NTNU Library <ul><li>11 library units </li></ul><ul><li>2.8 million books and periodicals </li></ul><ul><li>367 000 photographs, 32 000 maps, 30 000 music scores </li></ul><ul><li>46 300 electronic books, 11 800 electronic periodicals </li></ul><ul><li>166 databases (47 reference, 74 full text and 45 others) </li></ul><ul><li>Access to 1200 international reference databases </li></ul><ul><li>132 staff </li></ul><ul><li>Budget: NOK 143 million </li></ul>R & D and EDUCATION
    41. 45. Student town No. 1 in Norway <ul><li>One in five inhabitants in Trondheim is a student </li></ul><ul><li>The Student Union (Studentersamfundet) has 8 000 members and operates its own building </li></ul><ul><li>UKA , the student week, is Norway’s largest cultural festival </li></ul><ul><li>ISFiT = International Student Festival in Trondheim </li></ul><ul><li>NTNUI is Norway’s largest sports association with 10 000 members </li></ul>EDUCATION
    42. 46. NTNU Alumni <ul><li>For NTNU students and graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Contact with the community at large, business and industry </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: Networking and knowledge sharing </li></ul><ul><li>17 000 members (April 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>250 participating network groups </li></ul>www.ntnu.no/alumni
    43. 47. NTNU – Innovation and Creativity R&D  new knowledge TEACHING  expertise Dissemination of knowledge, expertise and R&D results. Contributes to improving the business community and society at large. Education for academic and professional purposes.Training. Developing new technology. International cooperation. INNOVATION AND INDUSTRY DISSEMINATION  innovation
    44. 48. Innovation – I <ul><li>Gløshaugen Innovation Centre (21 companies in-house, April 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>About 40 courses related to entrepreneurship </li></ul><ul><li>Centre for Entrepreneurship </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU Technology Transfer Office AS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help and support for people with business ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Search for business ideas among academic groups </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Start – a student-run organization for innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation agreements with industry </li></ul><ul><li>Events </li></ul>INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    45. 49. Innovation – II <ul><li>Results 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>80 business ideas </li></ul><ul><li>51 patents registered </li></ul><ul><li>8 new companies formed </li></ul><ul><li>4 license contracts </li></ul>INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    46. 50. Innovation and business development Innovation and renewal require interaction between: <ul><li>Investors , who finance new projects. </li></ul><ul><li>Entrepreneurs, who generate ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Business and industry , as owner and customer. </li></ul><ul><li>The universities , with an active role in the development of new business activities. </li></ul>INNOVATION & INDUSTRY Investors Universities Businesses Entrepreneurs
    47. 51. <ul><li>Wholly owned subsidiary of NTNU. </li></ul><ul><li>Creates business activities from research at NTNU and St. Olav University Hospital. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes spin-off companies and licenses new technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Win-win cooperation among scientists, companies and investors. </li></ul>NTNU Technology Transfer AS INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    48. 52. Gløshaugen Innovation Center NÆRINGSLIV OG NYSKAPING INNOVATION & INDUSTRY Norway’s first on-campus incubator for innovation in business and industry Incubator for companies from NTNU and SINTEF 21 companies (April 2009)
    49. 53. NTNU and industry – I <ul><li>Approx. 725 major research projects in cooperation with the industry, public sector and various funds </li></ul><ul><li>EUR 25 mill. to NTNU from industry in 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of NTNU’s 42 adjunct professors are directly connected to industry </li></ul><ul><li>Extensive offering in Continuing and Professional development, such as the annual industrial seminars in January </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU has education and research agreements with: </li></ul>Telenor Aker Jotun AS StatoilHydro Shell Total Rolls Royce Det norske Veritas Elkem INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    50. 54. NTNU and industry – II <ul><li>International placement projects through IAESTE and EC programmes </li></ul><ul><li>Formal agreements among NTNU’s faculties, businesses and industry to stimulate cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU Alumni (network for former students) has 17 000 members and about 250 alumni groups </li></ul><ul><li>Access Mid-Norway – provides new industries access to NTNU and other research and education institutions </li></ul>INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    51. 55. Norwegian Centres of Expertise (NCE) <ul><li>NTNU participates in six centres: </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Maritime, Møre </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Microsystems, Vestfold </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Systems Engineering, Kongsberg </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Subsea, Hordaland </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Raufoss </li></ul><ul><li>NCE Instrumentation, mid-Norway </li></ul>INNOVATION & INDUSTRY
    52. 56. SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
    53. 57. Science communication (2008) <ul><li>60 art productions/performances/presentations </li></ul><ul><li>111 events for the general public </li></ul><ul><li>330 popular scientific articles </li></ul><ul><li>860 popular scientific lectures </li></ul><ul><li>1 600 contributions from NTNU faculty in the media </li></ul><ul><li>11 000 visitors to the annual Science Festival and Researcher’s Night </li></ul><ul><li>14 000 articles in Norwegian and foreign media that mention NTNU </li></ul><ul><li>Popular periodicals published by NTNU: Gemini and Spor </li></ul><ul><li>Websites universitetsavisa.no and forskning.no </li></ul>SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
    54. 58. The Museum of Natural History and Archaeology at NTNU SCIENCE COMMUNICATION A university museum that conducts research and resource management in natural and cultural history. Scientific collections of national and international importance in natural and cultural history. Major activities in science and culture communication through exhibitions, botanical gardens, popular science events, the Internet and more. http://www.ntnu.no/vm/english
    55. 59. Trondheim Science Centre <ul><li>Centre for hands-on experience of science </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU is a financial contributor </li></ul><ul><li>68 000 visitors annually </li></ul><ul><li>200 interactive exhibits </li></ul><ul><li>Develops teaching materials such as books and models </li></ul><ul><li>Offers lectures and courses for teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Experimental club </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Robot laboratory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inventor’s workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Geology workshop </li></ul></ul>SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
    56. 60. <ul><li>Co-produced by NTNU and SINTEF </li></ul><ul><li>NTNU’s largest science communication effort </li></ul><ul><li>Six issues per year (4 in Norwegian, 2 in English) </li></ul><ul><li>Circulation: approx. 70 000 </li></ul><ul><li>Free subscription </li></ul><ul><li>Most cited science magazine in Norway </li></ul><ul><li>Winner of several first prizes as best corporate magazine </li></ul>GEMINI science magazine SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
    57. 61. Organization Faculties FACTS Board Architecture and Fine Art Rector Information Technology, Mathematics and Electrical Eng. Engineering Science and Technology Medicine Director Organization and Information Director Finance and Property Innovation and External Relations Prorectors Research and Innovation Education and Quality of Learning Humanities Natural Sciences and Technology Social Sciences and Technology Management
    58. 62. The Board – NTNU’s ruling body Marit Arnstad (Chair) Karin Röding (external) Ådne Cappelen (external) Morten Loktu (external) Bjarne Foss (academic staff) Anne K. Børresen (academic staff) Helge Holden (academic staff) Kristin Dæhli (techn. adm. staff) Haaken A. Moe ( acad./res.staff without tenure) Julia Iablokova (student) Morten Olimb (student) Torbjørn Digernes (Rector) FACTS FACTS
    59. 63. NTNU’s vision NTNU’s goal is to be an academic leader that safeguards and develops Norway’s technological expertise. With its strong disciplinary standing and broad academic scope, NTNU will contribute to greater understanding of the interactions between culture, society, nature and technology. OBJECTIVES From NTNU’s strategic document “Constructive, Creative and Critical”
    60. 64. Main strategies NTNU will develop its technological and scientific profile. NTNU will be a broadly based, modern university with focus on interdisciplinary development. NTNU will develop its role as an institution for education and research in an active dialogue with society, culture and industry. NTNU will be an attractive and stimulating environment for students and staff. OBJECTIVES From NTNU’s strategic document “Constructive, Creative and Critical”
    61. 65. Main objectives <ul><li>Develop and disseminate knowledge by maintaining, creating and spreading knowledge in interaction with society at large. Develop our graduates’ expertise by providing high quality research-based education that has relevance for both the individual and society at large. </li></ul><ul><li>Contribute to society at large by creating value and better living standards – regionally, nationally and globally </li></ul>OBJECTIVES From NTNU’s strategic document “NTNU2020 – Internationally Outstanding”
    62. 66. NTNU in 2020 – Internationally Outstanding <ul><li>International leader in our selected strategic research areas </li></ul><ul><li>Among the ten leading technological and scientific universities in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Among the top 1 % of universities in the world with broad academic scope </li></ul>OBJECTIVES From NTNU’s strategic document “NTNU2020 – Internationally Outstanding”

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