Safeguarding
Children
Ground Rules
Talking about child abuse can be
upsetting – take space and time if you
need it.
Aim
To develop awareness of, and the
ability to act on, concerns about the
safety and welfare of children and
young people
Two parts to safeguarding
Protect children from maltreatment
Prevent impairment
“Child abuse and neglect”
Abuse an neglect are forms of
maltreatment of a child.
Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by
...
Categories of abuse
Neglect
Physical abuse
Sexual abuse
Emotional abuse
What do children need?
Good family environment
Love
Attention
How worries about children come to
light
A child tells someone what is happening to them.
You see signs of abuse or neglec...
Key guidance and legislation
United Nation Convention on the Rights of the
child
Human Rights Act 1998
Children Act 1989
F...
Child in Need
Children Act 1989 s17(10)
A child shall be taken to be in need if:
Is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or ha...
Definition of Harm
Harm is defined in the Children Act 1989 section
31(9) as:
ill- treatment (including sexual abuse and p...
Significant Harm - 1
The children Act 1989 uses the
concept of significant harm to justify
compulsory intervention in fami...
Significant Harm - 2
There are no absolute criteria for
indentifying significant harm. The
severity of ill-treatment depen...
Significant Harm - 3
The extent of premeditation.
The degree of treat and coercion,
sadism and/or unusual elements.
In eac...
Silencing Factors
Fear you may be wrong.
Doubts about the child’s truthfulness.
Anger and distress.
Child’s attempts to bi...
Who are children likely to turn to?
‘The majority of children and young people
indentify at least one person they can talk...
What is important to children when
seeking an adult to trust:
Being there: children and young people having
the general fe...
Sharing your concerns
‘Identification of need’
Try to sort out in you mind why you are worried,
based on:
What you have se...
What should you do?
Be alert to signs of abuse and neglect. It can happen
anywhere.
Be prepared to respond calmly. Childre...
What should you not do?
Promise the child that you will not tell
anyone else. Instead explain that to help
them stop the a...
In summary
“Safeguarding & Promoting the
welfare of children” is not just about
reacting when facing serious or
significan...
Finally
It is the responsibility of professionals to
report concerns, NOT to decide whether it
is or is not child abuse.
C...
Psychology Student
Luciano Souza
lucianosouza77@hotmail.co.uk
July 2013
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Safeguarding children "managing abuse"

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Safeguarding children "managing abuse"

  1. 1. Safeguarding Children
  2. 2. Ground Rules Talking about child abuse can be upsetting – take space and time if you need it.
  3. 3. Aim To develop awareness of, and the ability to act on, concerns about the safety and welfare of children and young people
  4. 4. Two parts to safeguarding Protect children from maltreatment Prevent impairment
  5. 5. “Child abuse and neglect” Abuse an neglect are forms of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting, by those know to them or, more rarely, by a stranger. They may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children.
  6. 6. Categories of abuse Neglect Physical abuse Sexual abuse Emotional abuse
  7. 7. What do children need? Good family environment Love Attention
  8. 8. How worries about children come to light A child tells someone what is happening to them. You see signs of abuse or neglect. You see worries changes in a child’s behaviour or moods. You see worries changes in a parent’s behaviour to a child. Someone else tells you about something they have seen or heard. An adult or child tells you that they have hurt a child. A parent or carer tells you that they are having problems in meeting their child’s needs.
  9. 9. Key guidance and legislation United Nation Convention on the Rights of the child Human Rights Act 1998 Children Act 1989 Framework Children in Need and their Families for the Assessment of (2000) What To Do if You’re Worried a Child is Being Abused (2003) Education Act 2002 Children Act 2004 (section 11) Working Together to Safeguard Children (2006)
  10. 10. Child in Need Children Act 1989 s17(10) A child shall be taken to be in need if: Is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or have the opportunity of achieving or maintaining, a reasonable standard of health or development without the provision for them of services by a local authority under this part. Health or development is likely to be significantly impaired, or further impaired, without the provision of such services. Is case of disability.
  11. 11. Definition of Harm Harm is defined in the Children Act 1989 section 31(9) as: ill- treatment (including sexual abuse and physical abuse) Impairment of health (physical or mental) Impairment of development (physical, intellectual, emotional, social or behavioural)
  12. 12. Significant Harm - 1 The children Act 1989 uses the concept of significant harm to justify compulsory intervention in family life. The local authority has a duty to make enquiries where it has reasonable cause to suspect a child is suffering significant harm.
  13. 13. Significant Harm - 2 There are no absolute criteria for indentifying significant harm. The severity of ill-treatment depends on: The degree and extent of physical harm. The duration and frequency of abuse and neglect.
  14. 14. Significant Harm - 3 The extent of premeditation. The degree of treat and coercion, sadism and/or unusual elements. In each case consider ill-treatment alongside the family strengths and supports.
  15. 15. Silencing Factors Fear you may be wrong. Doubts about the child’s truthfulness. Anger and distress. Child’s attempts to bind you to secrecy. Uncertainty of procedures and consequences. Unresolved feelings. There may be other reasons for the child’s behaviour. Not wanting to interfere in family life.
  16. 16. Who are children likely to turn to? ‘The majority of children and young people indentify at least one person they can talk to …. A Significant minority of children do not feel they have anyone they can trust to share their worries with.’ Friends Mothers Fathers Other trusted adult
  17. 17. What is important to children when seeking an adult to trust: Being there: children and young people having the general feeling that an adult is there for them. Proving themselves: taking the time to listen, acting appropriately and keeping promises. Having the right attitude: not losing their temper or trying to take over. Knowing what they’re talking about: sharing relevant experience, and not acting as if they know more than they do.
  18. 18. Sharing your concerns ‘Identification of need’ Try to sort out in you mind why you are worried, based on: What you have seen. What you have heard from others. What has been said to you directly. Try to be as clear as you can about why you are worried but do not be afraid to listen to your instinct that something just does not seem to be right.
  19. 19. What should you do? Be alert to signs of abuse and neglect. It can happen anywhere. Be prepared to respond calmly. Children are more likely to allow you to help them if you are prepared to listen and appear not to panic. Keep a clear record of your concerns and what action you took. Make yourself aware of local procedures for responding to suspected abuse. Consult your Agency Child Protection advisor and/or Social Care if you are in any doubt. Where circumstances allow be honest as possible with parents.
  20. 20. What should you not do? Promise the child that you will not tell anyone else. Instead explain that to help them stop the abuse you will need to talk to other people. Try to “go it alone”. Children are best protected when all agencies do work together. IGNORE
  21. 21. In summary “Safeguarding & Promoting the welfare of children” is not just about reacting when facing serious or significant injuries. It is the proactive engagement with children, parents, cares, as well as colleagues to make sure children are safe and are achieving their potential.
  22. 22. Finally It is the responsibility of professionals to report concerns, NOT to decide whether it is or is not child abuse. Child protection is a multi-disciplinary activity. No individual should ever feel the sole responsibility of identifying abuse rests. The worst thing you can do is do nothing
  23. 23. Psychology Student Luciano Souza lucianosouza77@hotmail.co.uk July 2013

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