Doing Good Work

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Social Entrepreneurship as a business model

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  • Doing Good Work

    1. 1. DOING Social Entrepreneurship as a business model GOOD WORK
    2. 2. OLD MODEL
    3. 3. NEW MODEL
    4. 4. STRESS ANXIETY DEPRESSION WHY THE SHIFT?
    5. 5. STRESS ANXIETY DEPRESSION DOOMSDAY CLOCK
    6. 7. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Return Continuum Grant Funded Non-Profit (Charity) RETURN Social (Charitable) Financial (Commercial) Traditional Business Revenue Generating Non-Profit Social Purpose Business SVF Target Zone Social Enterprise (larger # in UK/US)
    7. 8. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Wikipedia: A social entrepreneur is someone who recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to make social change.
    8. 9. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Wikipedia: A social entrepreneur is someone who recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to make social change. Whereas a business entrepreneur typically measures performance in profit and return , a social entrepreneur assesses success in terms of the impact s/he has on society.
    9. 10. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Wikipedia: A social entrepreneur is someone who recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to make social change. Whereas a business entrepreneur typically measures performance in profit and return , a social entrepreneur assesses success in terms of the impact s/he has on society. While social entrepreneurs often work through nonprofits and citizen groups, many work in the private and governmental sectors
    10. 11. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP "Social entrepreneurs identify resources where people only see problems. They view the villagers as the solution, not the passive beneficiary. They begin with the assumption of competence and unleash resources in the communities they're serving.” -- David Bornstein, author of How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas
    11. 12. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Ashoka: Social entrepreneurship - the practice of responding to market failures with transformative and financially sustainable innovations aimed at solving social problems
    12. 13. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Ashoka: Social entrepreneurship - the practice of responding to market failures with transformative and financially sustainable innovations aimed at solving social problems Social entrepreneurs are “ change agents ,” creating “large-scale change through pattern-breaking ideas,” “addressing the root causes” of social problems, possessing “the ambition to create systemic change by introducing a new idea and persuading others to adopt it,” and changing “the social systems that create and maintain” problems.
    13. 14. SOCIAL ENTREPRENUERSHIP Ashoka: Social entrepreneurship - the practice of responding to market failures with transformative and financially sustainable innovations aimed at solving social problems Social entrepreneurs are “ change agents ,” creating “large-scale change through pattern-breaking ideas,” “addressing the root causes” of social problems, possessing “the ambition to create systemic change by introducing a new idea and persuading others to adopt it,” and changing “the social systems that create and maintain” problems. “ Social entrepreneurs are not content just to give a fish or teach how to fish. They will not rest until they have revolutionized the fishing industry.” – Bill Drayton, Founder of Ashoka
    14. 15. CANADIAN ASHOKA FELLOWS
    15. 17. Columbia, Duke, Harvard, Yale, Wharton U Stockholm School of SE, Seattle U, Uof Alberta, Earth U (Costa Rica) Uof Michigan, UNC Stanford, INSEAD, Berkeley, NYU
    16. 19. WHAT IS SOCIAL INNOVATION GENERATION? <ul><li>National initiative of four nodes across the country </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tim Draimin, National Executive Director </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tim Brodhead, McConnell Foundation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frances Westley, University of Waterloo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Al Etmanski, PLAN </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allyson Hewitt, MaRS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The primary aim of SiG is to encourage effective methods of addressing persistent social problems on a national scale </li></ul><ul><li>The activities of SiG serve to promote broad social change </li></ul><ul><li>SiG@MaRS brings this work to Ontario </li></ul>
    17. 20. WHAT DOES SIG@MaRS DO? SiG@MaRS is actively developing programs to support the launch and growth of social ventures, enhancing the skills and networks of social entrepreneurs , exploring new instruments of social finance , fostering opportunities for technology platforms to help scale social ventures and building the social enterprise community.
    18. 21. ENABLING ENVIRONMENT SOCIAL IMPACT METRICS BEST PRACTICES AROUND THE WORLD WHITE PAPERS KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION CURRICULUM
    19. 22. ADVISORY SERVICES A multi-disciplinary team of MaRS Advisors is available to support social entrepreneurs along with paid staff/ entrepreneurs in residence Commercialization Services Advisory Services Capital Services MaRS Business Services Market Intelligence Entrepreneurship Education Social/ Entrepreneurs in Residence MaRS Venture Group SiG staff Referrals for Funding Entrepreneurship 101 Events
    20. 23. SYSTEM TRANSFORMATION <ul><li>Social Finance </li></ul><ul><li>Social Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Public Policy </li></ul>
    21. 24. DOING GOOD, WORKS
    22. 25. THANK Lisa Torjman ltorjman@marsdd.com @lisatorjman Associate, Social Entrepreneurship (SiG@MaRS) MaRS Discovery District YOU
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