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For whom do we Build, Design, Make (Susan Williamson)
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For whom do we Build, Design, Make (Susan Williamson)

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Transcript

  • 1. for whom do we
    design and build?
    who knows most
    about their own
    spaces and places?
  • 2. demographic analysis:
    broad but shallow
    transactional analysis:
    narrow but deep
  • 3. spatial psychology is built
    on expert usership
    and understanding
    the nature of their
    spatial transactions
  • 4. finding the expert user base
    • examine demographic data
    • 5. understand the issues
    • 6. find the 1st connector, explore the issues
    • 7. connector cascade
    • 8. agree the archetypal expert users
    • 9. find the first ten and cascade out to 40
  • finding the Voice
    • build the contract
    • 10. set up an appropriate campaign
    • 11. give voice, listen, feedback
    • 12. adjust, consult, agree
    • 13. legacy mechanism agreed
  • TARGET GROUPINGS
    by,000’s
    2125young &
    mobile
    Mid Easterners
    500Gulf
    shopping
    visitors
    2000 ‘Western’ tourists
    710 local Emirate
    families
    780business
    visitors
    1200 wealthy
    South Asians
    300 ‘Western’
    Expatriate
    workers
    primary grouping
    secondary grouping
  • 14. SIZE OF OPPORTUNITY
    +
    -
    FREQUENCY OF VISITS
    -
    Western’
    expatriate
    workers
    business
    visitors
    ‘Western’ tourists
    Emirate
    families
    APPEAL OF CONCEPT
    Gulf shoppers
    wealthy Asians
    +
    mobile Middle Eastern
  • 15.
  • 16. GRADING THE RISK FACTORS
    FACTORS
    • exclusive vs inclusive
    • 17. standalone vs. mall
    • 18. partner vs. solo
    +
    -
    RISK
    excl
    stand
    solo
    excl
    stand
    part
    excl
    mall
    solo
    incl
    stand
    solo
    excl
    mall
    part
    incl
    stand
    part
    incl
    mall
    solo
    incl
    mall
    part
  • 19. what do we mean by luxury??
  • what kind of customer experience…?
  • fetish
    transactions:
    Bond-ness
  • 40. tribal
    transactions:
    head chatter
  • 41. shopping psychology: aisle behaviour
  • 42. introducing the archetypes
    30’s male manager in the software industry: well off
    young club-going, commuting girl.
    male financial-industries football and sports-bar devotee
    Asian teenager, non-drinking
    white British teenager, too young to drink legally
    family with young children
    young over-educated Eastern European services worker
    40-something male skilled manual worker
    youngish artisan/performer
    retired female college lecturer
    male / female retail manager
    60’s – 70’s blue collar retirees.
    50-something, affluent commuter with teenage kids
  • 43. which venues serve the most archetypes?
  • 44. who is under-served in the town centre?
    • families and kids
    • 45. cool teens (other than drinking!)
    • 46. cultural minority groups
    • 47. affluent 30+s
    • 48. business users
  • how do your cultural assets stack up?
  • 49. Watford’s road system constricts formal circulation and bisects the city centre…
  • 50. people find their own ways to where they want to go… add the underpass thread…
  • 51. add the well-signposted cycle route thread…
  • 52. and the randomness of everyday culture, lived in public… finding the real desire lines through meandering …
  • 53. Woodside Leisure Centre
    The Parade
    The Horns
    Library
    Colosseum
    Palace Theatre
    Cassiobury Park
    cultural venues extend beyond the city centre , and most thrive in spite of the road system constrictions …
    Muse
    Palace Cafe
    Café Cha Cha
    Market
    The Pump House
    Newton Price Centre
    St Mary’s Church
    Harlequin
    Museum
  • 54. www.cornerstonestrategies.co.uk
    the city’s threads are unplanned as well as planned, and the cultural zone extends organically.. .
  • 55. no international design exchange
  • 56. Blackpool Pride
  • 57. finding a common voice
  • 58. access, not buildings
  • 59. Mapping the Necklace
  • 60. pray, farm, fish, remember
  • 61. organising strategies: making do
  • 62. the largest room
    in the world
  • 63. building the Temple
  • 64. bringing it to life

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