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Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
Media Kit   Lyndsey K  Sites
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Media Kit Lyndsey K Sites

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  • 1. LYNDSEY K. SITES Image Consultant Press Kit
  • 2. Profile Lyndsey K. Sites “Everyone deserves to look and feel their absolute best everyday,” is the mantra of Lyndsey Sites, Image Consultant, Personal Stylist and Personal Shopper for Global Image Group. Through maximizing client’s current wardrobes, demonstrating how to mix and match, and utilizing accessories to transform any outfit, Lyndsey educates men and women on the secrets behind style. She looks beyond the latest trends, inspires clients to select clothing that gives them a sense of renewal, and reveals a unique look suitable for the client’s individual needs and lifestyle. With over seven years of experience in the finance and legal industries, Lyndsey utilizes her business background, professionalism and natural eye for fashion to simplify the lives of her clients. She takes the guesswork out of creating the perfect ensemble, dresses her clients for success, and motivates them to look and feel good everyday and for every occasion. Lyndsey was formally educated and certified by the Sterling Style Academy in New York. Through previous career experiences and industry training, she has a thorough understanding of the importance of leveraging positive first impressions through self-confidence and outward appearance. She believes that a dynamic image can be created without having to surrender style or comfort. Lyndsey attended University of Maryland and pursued a degree in Human Resources. She currently resides in Washington D.C and serves clients throughout the United States. About Global Image Group Global Image Group's mission is to deliver the most cost-effective, high-impact image consulting services to forward-thinking individuals, professionals and corporations that want to define and refine their brand identity. Headquartered in San Francisco with offices in New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Washington DC, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, North Carolina, London, Toronto, Tokyo, Hong Kong and the Middle East, Global Image Group is strategically located to serve clients worldwide. Established by Michelle T. Sterling, AICI, Global Image Group has been providing individual and corporate image expertise for over 15 years. We are a full-service consulting firm specializing in style makeovers, wardrobe evaluation and management, personal styling, and personal shopping. Our team of professional wardrobe and style consultants will help you increase confidence, develop successful business and social relationships, and achieve your goals from the boardroom to the living room. For more information, visit Global Image Group at www.globalimagegrp.com. Lyndsey K. Sites Personal Stylist | Global Image Group 1.888.607.8689 direct 1.888.873.8017 main 1.888.616.4598 fax lsites@globalimagegrp.com www.globalimagegrp.com
  • 3. Press Release FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Lyndsey K. Sites Personal Stylist | Global Image Group 1.888.607.8689 direct | 1.888.616.4598 fax lsites@globalimagegrp.com | www.globalimagegrp.com “Create a New Look by Shopping in Your Closet and Incorporating the Latest Trends on a Budget” Washington, DC- (April 15, 2009) – In today’s economy many are tightening their purse strings and avoiding making purchases all together. However image consultants are advising us otherwise and recommending that we invest in ourselves by add pieces sporadically to our wardrobe to give us that renewed sense of confidence. You may have an old pair of jeans and t-shirt outfit that you love and all it would take to make it up-to-date is to add an accessory. Or perhaps you own an expensive classic, black blazer that you’d like to keep and are wondering how you can modify the look. Here are some tips on how to incorporate the pieces that we love and wear into a new look on a budget. Lyndsey Sites, Personal Stylist and Image Consultant for Global Image Group, suggests sprucing up your look this season with bright colors. Look fresh and chic by making a statement with jewelry. Be it a necklace, cuff, broach or cocktail ring, one thing is constant - it must be big and bold. Ms. Sites recommends bib necklaces that are inspired by exotic or ethnic elements. They include eye catching gems and stones in vibrant colors and draw attention to the face while giving a basic white collared shirt or a basic crew neck blouse a special touch. Revisit your existing wardrobe and assess which current trends will diversify your wardrobe and take what you once thought was drab and turn it into something fabulous. Another trend Ms. Sites recommends is pairing a basic neutral-colored dress with a shoe that commands attention. This season it all comes down to the details and boring just doesn't cut it. Look for Gladiator sandals in all heights of heels where you really can dress your outfit up or down. Another style she suggests is a shoe with mixed metallic & neon python for a modern evening look.
  • 4. As for clothing, Ms. Sites’ trend of choice is anything one shoulder or asymmetric. This look is subtly sexy and intriguing to the eye, and is able to be worn with basic black skirts or Seven jeans. For more useful style tips, contact Personal Stylist Lyndsey Sites of Global Image Group. We specialize in image makeovers, wardrobe consulting, personal styling, and personal shopping. You are your brand and your look is your logo. Let a Global Image Group wardrobe consultant help you create your own signature style. For more information about Lyndsey Sites and Global Image Group, log on to www.globalimagegrp.com.
  • 5. Press Release FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Lyndsey K. Sites Image Consultant | Global Image Group 1.888.607.8689 direct | 1.888.616.4598 fax lsites@globalimagegrp.com | www.globalimagegrp.com Dressing for the Job in Today’s Job Market Washington D.C. – (April 15, 2009) – With the weakened economy and more people hunting for work every day, job candidates are thinking beyond the usual resume and references to gain that competitive edge. Not only must professionals keep their business skills honed, they must maintain a professional image that is current and emphasizes the message they choose to communicate. Ensuring you look as brilliant as your resume is the best way to distinguish yourself in today’s volatile job market. When considering what to wear for an interview, sometimes the best idea is to start fresh. While some candidates may have to spice it up or clean it up, others have to tone it down to land the job they want. The first interview is not the time to be a fashion icon when getting the job is the goal. If you are too fashionable it will distract from your professionalism. Don’t let your appearance keep you from getting a job. Young women especially have a tendency to dress unfavorably according to hiring personnel. Use your looks to your advantage; dress for the position in a conservative manner and let your inner beauty shine. Win over the human resource manager with your ability to get the job done, eagerness to work hard and positive outlook. If the office atmosphere is business casual, here are some useful interview guidelines. Wearing business casual attire for the first interview is seldom recommended unless the interviewer has specifically advised you to dress that way. For senior positions, it’s always best to opt for a suit. Women have always had to choose from a variety of different looks. With greater wardrobe options and the evolution of workplace roles, women have had to work harder at projecting the right first impression. There was a time when women entered the boardroom and needed to make a power statement. These days clothing choice must also project approachability without being sexy. To project a positive first impression, make sure you feel good in your clothing, have a positive outlook, and when in doubt boring is better. Your clothing is a reflection of you. If you look good, you’ll feel good and others will respond accordingly to you. Investing in your professional attire will be a good return on your investment for your career. If you are just beginning your career and don’t have a lot of money to spend, browse upscale consignment shops in your area or look for a well tailored suit in stores like Ann Taylor or Banana Republic. If you are seeking a clerical position, dress conservatively but not necessarily in a suit. Clean, tailored separates are fine. And if you are seeking a senior level position, make sure your suit is dark in color, well-tailored and firm in fabric to communicate authority and credibility. For more information about Lyndsey Sites and Global Image Group, log on to www.globalimagegrp.com.
  • 6. Photos
  • 7. Media References Connoisseur's Guide Superstar Stylists Lauren Sherman, 10.13.06, 12:00 AM ET Famous people follow fashion closely--just as fashion follows famous people. Take New York's Fashion Week in September, for example. The stars--from Kate Bosworth (at Jill Stuart) to Hillary Duff (at Michael Kors)--were front row and center at runway shows. Pampered with primo seats, gift bags and attention, they flaunted signature looks featuring their favorite designers--looks that help propel the celebrities onto fashion pages and the clothing to coveted status. After all, when a public figure develops a distinctive and appealing style, you have women clamoring for the perfect pair of oversized vintage sunglasses (à la Nicole Richie), or the exact Yves Saint Laurent bag Sienna Miller was toting around London. In Pictures: Ten Stylists And Their Stars But these stars often aren't making their mark on fashion by themselves. Like many of us not pursuing careers in the spotlight, they find that developing a strong sense of what works--and what really, really doesn't--can be tricky. So, they rely on wardrobe stylists like Robert Verdi, Britt Bardo and Nicole Chavez to create the clothing combinations others crave. While you may not know their names, these super-stylists play powerful roles in the fashion- fame collaboration. And by placing a hardware-heavy handbag in the crook of an actress's arm, or a pair of retro sneakers on an action star, they've probably influenced what you wear. Stylists must be fully aware of the latest and greatest designers, know how to create a look, understand the importance of event dressing (on the red carpet, the line between daring and disastrous is eating-disorder-thin) and maintain excellent relationships with fashion publicists, the people who lend celebrities designer duds. That sartorial expertise doesn’t come cheap. Stylists like Verdi, whose current client roster includes Desperate Housewives star Eva Longoria, can charge $2,000 to $2,500 for an award show prep day and $25,000 to $50,000 for an extensive project, such as a photo shoot or a commercial. And, their power is reaching ever-farther. Some, like Rachel Zoe, are becoming celebrities themselves. Many, like Bardo, have designer aspirations. quot;It has definitely opened up other doors,” says Bardo, the woman behind Kate Hudson’s haute- hippie image. “I've been talking about how I want to start a small clothing line, or an intimate apparel line.quot;
  • 8. Chavez and her client Rachel Bilson, who stars in the Fox television show The O.C., considered collaborating on a clothing line, but instead now focus on supporting fledging designers whose collections they like. Now, those designers are reaping the benefits of Bilson’s shining star. Her signature style--a mix of designer and vintage--has landed her on the covers of glossies like Teen Vogue and in the pages of weeklies like Life and Style, where red carpet looks are regularly featured. As Chavez puts it, quot;Nowadays with the weeklies, when [readers] see somebody they recognize, they notice which designer they're wearing, and it just resonates.quot; Designer Brian Reyes flew Bilson and Chavez from Los Angeles to New York to create a one-of- a-kind dress for the starlet, just in time for his New York Fashion Week show. Chavez also often dresses Bilson in Brooklyn-based designers Vena Cava and Los Angeles-based designer Jenni Kayne. So, Bilson will be the first to don Vena Cava's Spring 2007 collection while promoting her latest film, The Last Kiss, in Europe. With so much emphasis being placed on the appearance of film and television stars, ordinary people are also feeling pressure to look perfect. That's where Michelle T. Sterling, founder of Global Image Group, comes in. Sterling, who has worked in both finance and fashion, began Global Image Group six years ago to help men and women quot;refine their image and stylequot; through personal style overhauls, closet makeovers and personal shopping trips. Fees range from $150 to $350 per hour--vastly cheaper than Robert Verdi, though you don't get to brag about sharing experts with Eva Longoria's. Some stylists are adamant that this kind specialized attention is unnecessary for the woman next door. Verdi's experiences with quot;normalquot; people, some who have paid up to $25,000 in a charity auction for a day of his services, have been lackluster, he says. quot;[Styling is] about balancing the image of the celebrity,quot; Verdi explains. quot;A normal person doesn't need that.quot; Verdi says women simply need quot;an understanding of the trends in general.quot; Chavez, however, cites three important rules for every woman: invest neutral basics, stay on- trend with accessories, and use a tailor to make clothes fit to perfection. quot;It’s more affordable, and in the end you will be able to get dressed faster and with more ease,quot; she says. Of course, if ease isn't what you're looking for, there's always an expert out there--for a price.
  • 9. In Pictures: Ten Stylists And Their Stars Superstar Stylists © Getty Rachel Zoe Clients: Nicole Richie, Mischa Barton, Linsday Lohan, Kiera Knightly Zoe, who is photographed nearly as often as her clients, is credited with taking Nicole Richie from a simple mess to a style icon. She's now collaborating with Judith Leiber on a line of evening bags. Superstar Stylists © Getty Britt Bardo Clients: Kate Hudson, Eva Mendez, Jennifer Lopez Bardo's Midwestern roots have kept her grounded in the worlds of celebrity and high fashion. Her closest client--Kate Hudson--shares her hippie-chic aesthetic.
  • 10. Superstar Stylists © Getty Nicole Chavez Clients: Rachel Bilson, Jamie King, Kristen Bell, Melinda Clarke Chavez began her career in fashion as a set costumer, but quickly moved onto personal styling for her good friend Rachel Bilson. Her newest client is Veronica Mars' Kristen Bell. Superstar Stylists © Getty Phillip Bloch Clients: Halle Berry, Sandra Bullock Bloch was one of the first celebrity stylists to become a quot;personality,quot; frequently appearing on television. He also published a book in the late '90s called Elements of Style. He is widely noted for dressing former client Halle Berry in a daring Elie Saab gown, with sheer top and draped skirt, on the evening of her first Oscar win.
  • 11. Superstar Stylists © Getty Annabel Tollman Clients: Scarlett Johansson Former Interview fashion director Tollman has contributed to Johansson's Sexiest Woman Alive status, outfitting her in sweet-yet-sultry tea dresses. Superstar Stylists © Getty Robert Verdi Clients: Eva Longoria From the cover of Maxim to the Emmy Awards, Verdi keeps Longoria's look simple, sexy and loaded with color.
  • 12. Superstar Stylists © Getty Anna Bingemann Clients: Uma Thurman, Gwyneth Paltrow, Rachel Weisz, Naomi Watts British stylist Anna Bingemann favors floor-skimming, ethereal looks from designers like Rochas, Valentino and Atelier Versace. Superstar Stylists © Getty Kate Young Clients: Natalie Portman, Michelle Williams, Jennifer Connolly New York-based stylist Kate Young can seemingly do no wrong--Michelle Williams's Vera Wang was the standout gown at this year's Academy Awards, even though it was a tricky mustard yellow. And Natalie Portman is a regular on best-dressed lists, preferring Parisian houses like Lanvin and Balenciaga.
  • 13. Superstar Stylists © Getty Cristina Ehrlich and Estee Stanley Clients: The Olsen Twins, Mandy Moore Ehrlich and Stanley should be credited with Mandy Moore's transformation from bubble gum beauty to high fashion heavyweight. Yet their most notable contribution to the scene might be the duo's Miss Davenporte fashion line which, after only two seasons, has developed quite a strong cult following. Your Own Superstar Stylists Michelle T. Sterling and Her Team of Stylists Clients: Indra Zuno for Mervyn’s, Gallo Winery, American Gem Society, Yahoo, Google Michelle T. Sterling and her team of stylists worldwide specialize in making you feel like a superstar everyday.
  • 14. February 02, 2004 TALK OF THE TOTE By TOM SYKES A purse isn't just a place to keep your lipstick - it's a statement. When domestic diva Martha Stewart showed up for her first court appearance toting a $12,000 Hermes Birkin bag, some observers saw it as a sign of confidence and classic style. quot;The choice of this very expensive bag expresses her status,quot; says image consultant Michelle T. Sterling, president of Global Image Group, quot;and it is also an authoritative bag. It's got a solid structure. It's saying, 'I mean business today.' quot; Others called it a hand-stitched symbol of arrogance. quot;Martha wasn't thinking when she took this to court,quot; says image adviser Jill Bremer of Bremer Communications. quot;The message this bag gives is, 'I don't care about poor people. I have nothing to do with them. I am rich and untouchable.' People just don't recognize the importance of these details when it comes to the image you project.quot; In the wake of Martha's Birkin moment, we asked a panel of experts to tell us what messages other stars' bags are transmitting. Weighing in were three image consultants - Sterling, Bremer and Catherine Bell, founder of a group called Prime Impressions - who make a living telling corporate honchos what to wear. We also threw in Michael Kucmeroski, senior fashion editor of Esquire magazine, to offer a male point of view. quot;Like a tie on a man, when a bag is right, it really adds sex appeal to a woman's outfit, but if it's wrong, it can ruin everything,quot; he says. quot;Bags are a place to really express yourself. They say a lot about who you are.quot; Kristin Davis Michelle: The feminine pink gives off the message that she is very feminine, very approachable. She's saying, quot;I'm soft and kind and caring.quot; Catherine: This bag says, quot;I'm safe, I'm not flamboyant and I don't want to be the center of attention.quot; Michael: It says, quot;I'm matronly and boring.quot;
  • 15. Marisa Tomei Catherine: This bag says, quot;I'm relaxed, I'm off-duty, take me or leave me, I don't care.quot; Jill: Marisa looks very relaxed. The bag is letting us know she's bohemian, but it is also saying, quot;I don't like pretense.quot; Michael: I think this bag is trying to say that she's a no-nonsense girl who doesn't need to be flashy to be beautiful. Cameron Diaz Catherine: You can tell Cameron is very confident from her choice of color here. This bag is just saying, quot;Here I am!quot; She wants to stand out. Jill: This bag is almost sloppy-looking. And look at that color. This bag just says, quot;I don't care what you think.quot; Michael: This bag's message is, quot;I'll do what I want to do!quot; Christina Aguilera Michelle: This bag doesn't go well with her outfit, and she needs to think harder about how to pull her look together. If it says anything, it says, quot;I'm different from everyone else.quot; Catherine: A white bag projects your wealth because no bag is going to stay white for long. And although this bag is partly utilitarian, it also shows that she wants to be thought of as a very fashion-forward person - anyone else would just use a duffel. Michael: It just screams, quot;Look at me.quot; Britney Spears Michelle: I would say that the fur spots and the multicolored Louis Vuitton monogramming tell you that here is a girl with a colorful personality, a very creative style and a sense of her own individuality. Jill: This says, quot;I'm cool, I'm successful, I'm at the top of my game.quot; This is the Birkin equivalent for Britney's generation. Michael: This bag makes her look very bitchy. Gwyneth Paltrow Catherine: I don't think this bag is making much of a statement at all. It's just a big sack. Jill: This is a great bag, I think. It's saying, quot;I'm classy but youthful. I can play the trends, but I can still act my age.quot; Michael: It says, quot;Don't come near me!quot; She wants attention, but she wants it on her own terms. © copyright 2003 The New York Post
  • 16. Posted 12/5/2006 10:49 PM ET Survival tips for holiday shoppers: How to choose the right gift and control Spending By Jayne O'Donnell, USA TODAY It's the thinking — not the thought — that counts. That's the conclusion of gift-giving expert Sherri Athay after years of seeing ill-conceived presents fall flat. And as financial adviser Edmond Walters knows all too well, gift-giving must be both appropriate and affordable. He's seen all too many people spend beyond their means at holiday time. The gifts you choose send a message. Inexpensive gifts can be as meaningful — even more meaningful — than costly ones, experts say. Here are some ideas on how to keep your holiday spending under control and how to make sure your money is well spent. How to choose the right gift for the money: 1) Pay attention to what your recipients really want or need. Michelle Sterling, founder of Global Image Group, an image-consulting and personal-shopping firm, says unlikely gifts can be perfect for the right person. She had a client whose girlfriend loved snow cones. So he bought her a personalized snow- cone making machine. She loved it and was touched by the thought that went into the gift. Some gifts aren't appreciated. quot;There are always people giving makeovers as a gift. Some wives didn't take their makeover well,quot; Sterling says. quot;Why not talk about it first?quot; Still, you can make some assumptions about gift recipients, Athay says. Few people really want to clean, she notes. So if your mother says she wants a vacuum cleaner, quot;If you really love her, give her a cleaning service.quot; 2) Consider how you would explain why you chose a gift for someone. Gifts should have some meaning. And you should know what it is. If you think about this before you buy something, Athay says, it quot;keeps you from having to explain the wooden duck.quot; 3) Make sure the gift is an appropriate one coming from you. This rules out intimate gifts for people with whom you are not, umm, intimate. Save the trips to Victoria's Secret for your significant other and then only if it's the kind of item she would truly want to wear. Remember the tip about sending messages that might not be well received. 4) Save the gift cards for the people you don't know well or who truly want them.
  • 17. Gift cards say, quot;Here, go shop for yourself,quot; Athay says. quot;The message you convey is, 'You're just like everyone else,' and it doesn't indicate a lot of thought.quot; That said, some people love gift cards. Ask the teenagers on your list. 5) If you can afford them, two things that almost always go over well are jewelry and cars, Sterling says. But Walters warns against telling yourself you're getting either as quot;an investment.quot; Cars, in particular, will depreciate quickly. Want to make a gift an investment? Walters says to contribute to a child's education or a spouse's retirement fund. Now that really sends a message that you care, he says. How to control spending during holiday shopping: 1) Don't break the bank. Walters recommends never spending more than 5% of your gross income, unless all of your retirement savings and bills are well covered. 2) Decide what you're going to buy before you go into a store. Impulse buys are often over budget and not really what the recipient wants or needs. Retailers will tell you every season has its quot;must haves,quot; but those on your gift list might not be so trendy. quot;Don't fall for the hype from the retailers if it isn't relevant to the recipient,quot; says Athay, author of Present Perfect: Unforgettable Gifts for Every Occasion. Walters recommends approaching holiday shopping with a level head — and a list. quot;A lot of time, the impulsiveness gets everyone in trouble,quot; says Walters, founder of emoneyadvisor.com. 3) Stop shopping when you're done shopping. If you start shopping early, as retailers urge you to do, stop shopping early, too. The longer the shopping season gets, the more you'll be tempted to buy. Many people quot;shop until Christmas Evequot; no matter when they start, Athay says. 4) Consider giving one gift that both you and your significant other need and will enjoy (and would probably get in the next year anyway). Maybe it's a flat-screen TV or a gas grill. It can be a slightly more extravagant one than you would have chosen another time of the year. It's a way to save money overall because it's one gift between you, but it will feel like you're treating yourself. 5) Make your annual family vacation part of your Christmas gift-giving. You'll spend the money anyway, but making it part of Christmas adds to the holiday excitement and gives everyone time to read up on a destination. Walter, who has two children in college, says his family takes a trip to a different country each spring or summer, but the destination is announced at Christmas. quot;My kids get very excited to find out what we're doing,quot; he says. quot;They have six months to get all excited.quot; SAFETY TIPS: Be sure to watch out for crooks

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