Get Active!Using Active Learning Activities During First Year Information       Literacy Sessions             Lisa Shamchu...
OutlineThis session will:   • Discuss the importance of including active     learning techniques in IL.   • Present the IL...
Background• Information Literacy Assessment Project:  – Assess student learning during first year ENGL    102/111 IL sessi...
Active LearningActive learning refers to a student- centred instruction method whichfocuses on having students activelypar...
Active Learning• Advantages:  – Increases student interest  – Increases student motivation  – Increases student involvemen...
Tips for the Active Learning Classroom• Talk informally with students as they arrive for class.• Expect that students will...
Training Manual       “Every day is a great day for hockey.”                 Mario Lemeiux• Project Background• Active Lea...
Pre-Game (optional)                   First Period                   Second Period                    Third Period        ...
Get Active!• 6 stations  – 5 activities  – Training Manual• 5 minutes at each station  1. Read the activity instructions  ...
ReflectionOf the 5 activities, which one(s) could you seeyourself using in your sessions? Why?What potential problems/issu...
Questions?    Lisa ShamchukshamchukL@macewan.ca      Leah PlouffetownsendL8@macewan.ca*
References“Active learning" (2009). In S. Wallace (Ed.), A dictionary of education. Retrieved from 2012            from ht...
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Get Active! Using Active Learning Activities During First Year Information Literacy Sessions

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Get Active! Using Active Learning Activities During First Year Information Literacy Sessions

  1. 1. Get Active!Using Active Learning Activities During First Year Information Literacy Sessions Lisa Shamchuk & Leah Plouffe Grant MacEwan University Library University of Alberta Library Session August 28, 2012 10:00am – 11:30am
  2. 2. OutlineThis session will: • Discuss the importance of including active learning techniques in IL. • Present the IL manual used by the teaching team to tailor sessions to their own style as well as the particular class. • Allow participants to try out numerous active learning activities.
  3. 3. Background• Information Literacy Assessment Project: – Assess student learning during first year ENGL 102/111 IL sessions – Pilot Winter 2012 term – Future assessment planned for 2012-2013• Needed to refresh and update the pedagogical approaches to our sessions
  4. 4. Active LearningActive learning refers to a student- centred instruction method whichfocuses on having students activelyparticipate in the learning process.
  5. 5. Active Learning• Advantages: – Increases student interest – Increases student motivation – Increases student involvement – Allows students to express their ideas/opinions – Allows students to practice their skills – Improves group work dynamics – Recognizes a variety of learning styles – Encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning
  6. 6. Tips for the Active Learning Classroom• Talk informally with students as they arrive for class.• Expect that students will participate and act accordingly.• Arrange the classroom to encourage participation including putting chairs in a cluster or circle if appropriate.• Reduce anonymity by introducing yourself. Ask the class to relate previous library experiences to you.• Use small group discussion, questioning, and writing to allow for non-threatening methods of student participation.• Give students time to give responses, do not rush them.• Reward students for participating by praising them or paraphrasing what they say.• Draw the students into discussions by showing the relevance of the library to their studies.• Allow students time to ask questions at the end of class.• Use humour to add an element of fun to sessions. (Drueke, 1992)
  7. 7. Training Manual “Every day is a great day for hockey.” Mario Lemeiux• Project Background• Active Learning rationale• Lesson Plan Template – Sample Lesson Plans• Activity Instructions• Activity Resources – Also available on our intranet• References
  8. 8. Pre-Game (optional) First Period Second Period Third Period Overtime Introduction to (or review Identifying alternate Applying Boolean Logic Identifying Searching databases of) the library and its synonyms and spellings popular/trade/academic services articles Jeopardy Taboo Human Booleans Sorting Journals ScrimmageReview of library skills Topic keywords are declared Student clothing or birthdates Provided stacks of mixed Based on discovery principle,(general library, catalogue, taboo and cannot be used to are used to demonstrate how types of journals are sorted students search databases onperiodicals, databases, etc) search. Students brainstorm Boolean operators can be and described by students. their topic without receivingusing Powerpoint Jeopardy other terms in pairs or used to narrow or widen a instruction and then discussgame. groups. search. their methods before the librarian demonstrates. Shoot Out Synonym Race Shuffle and Deal Wanted Ad Librarian Needs a New CarStudents write questions on Students are placed in teams Students are given a playing Students write a wanted ad Students search for an itemslips of paper and throw them and given a keyword. Teams card, and stand when for academic journals, and discuss different resultsto the front of the class. then race to come up with the instructor asks for certain describing their found via web, CBCA,Questions are answered at most synonyms. combinations using AND, OR characteristics. 1search, catalogue, etc.the end of the session, if not to demonstrate how Booleancovered at the beginning or operators can be used toduring the class. narrow or widen a search. Press Conference Coloured Shapes Resource Referee: Journals Resource Referee: DatabasesColoured cards with library Premade coloured shapes Folders are filled with articlesquestions are given to are given out to students. that might be found in Folders are filled with itemsstudents at the beginning of Students stand when their different types of journals etc. that might be found onclass and answered card is described with AND, Students are asked to Google, different databases,throughout at timely intervals. OR, NOT to demonstrate how examine contents and etc. Students are asked to Boolean operators can be comment. examine contents and used to narrow or widen a comment. search.
  9. 9. Get Active!• 6 stations – 5 activities – Training Manual• 5 minutes at each station 1. Read the activity instructions 2. Examine any accompanying resources 3. Use questions provided to lead your discussion• Listen for the bell to switch stations!
  10. 10. ReflectionOf the 5 activities, which one(s) could you seeyourself using in your sessions? Why?What potential problems/issues can you foreseewith any of these activities?What types of active learning activities are youalready doing in your sessions?
  11. 11. Questions? Lisa ShamchukshamchukL@macewan.ca Leah PlouffetownsendL8@macewan.ca*
  12. 12. References“Active learning" (2009). In S. Wallace (Ed.), A dictionary of education. Retrieved from 2012 from http://www.oxfordreference.comBooth, C. (2011). Reflective teaching, effective learning: Instructional literacy for library educators. Chicago: American Library Association.Burkhardt, J. M., MacDonald, M. C., & Rathemacher, A. J. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standards-based exercises for college students (2nd ed.). Chicago: American Library Association.Chen, K. & Lin, P. (2011). Information literacy in university library user education. Aslib Proceedings, 63(4), 399-418. doi:10.1108/00012531111148967Drueke, J. (1992). Active learning in the university library instruction classroom. Research Strategies, 10 (Spring), pp. 77-83.Holderied, A. C. (2011). Instructional design for the active: Employing interactive technologies and active learning exercises to enhance information literacy. Journal of Information Literacy, 5(1), 23-32. Retrieved from http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JILSittler, R., & Cook, D. (2009). The library instruction cookbook. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries.

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