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Wikis
 

Wikis

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    Wikis Wikis Presentation Transcript

    •  
      • A collaborative website whose content can be edited by anyone who has access to it (American Heritage Dictionary.)
      • “Different people have different ideas about what a wiki really is, but whatever angle you look at it, a wiki is software that handles complex problems with simple solutions.”
      • Anything you want! Use a wiki for vocabulary, use it to share and store documents, use it for homework, and more.
      • See how they did it at Virginia Commonwealth University:
        • http://blog.vcu.edu/socialworknewsletter/2009/03/using_wiki_spaces_as_a_teachin.html
      • Pretty much anyone can use a wiki, you can use it and your students can too.
        • See how Clark County School District’s teachers use a wiki as a resource for each other:
          • http://wiki- teacher.com /
        • Ideas for science teachers:
          • http://www.suite101.com/content/using-wikis-in-science-classes-for-collaboration-a67853
      • Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website
      • Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis
      • Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities
      • Wikis Simplify Site Organization
      • Wikis Keep Track of All Your Stuff
      • Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis
      • Wikis Record Document Histories
      • Wikis Use Simple Markup
        • http://articles.sitepoint.com/article/what-is-a-wiki
      • http://www.wikispaces.com
      • http://pbworks.com
      • http://www.wikidot.com
      • http://www.wiki.com/
      • http://geographywiki.wikispaces.com/
      • This wiki was a collaborative effort of the whole class.
      • Students were required to create entries on the wiki using vocabulary words.
      • Students were encouraged to include photos, diagrams, and maps.
      • This wiki is searchable and contains most of the vocabulary for the textbook.
      • It helped students learn geography as well as reinforcing basic writing skills and it gave them new computer skills.
      • This wiki was also used to store slide shows, videos, maps, and a contact page.
      • http://worldregionswiki.wikispaces.com/
      • This wiki was a collaborative effort of most of the class.
      • Participation in this wiki was voluntary.
      • Students were requested to post news articles and videos on the wiki which pertained to regions of the world they were to report on.
      • Students were also encouraged to publish their final projects on the wiki .
      • Much more information was provided to the class through their news postings that I would have ever been capable alone.
      • This wiki was also used to store slide shows, videos, maps, and other course documents.
      • Subsequent wikis have been used to create web pages for Physical Geography, Cultural Geography, and Geography Labs.
      • These have been used mainly to store slide shows, documents, link videos, and coordinate field trips.
      • I have used these to showcase student projects.
      • These wikis were not collaborative efforts.
        • http://northamericawiki.wikispaces.com/
        • http://schmidtphysicalgeography.wikispaces.com/
        • http://geog5.wikispaces.com/
        • http://craftonlab.wikispaces.com/
        • http://schmidtvvclab.wikispaces.com/
    • Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website
      • Each page on a wiki has an Edit link. If you want to change something on the page, click the link, and the wiki will display a simple editing screen. When you finish making changes, submit them by clicking a button, and, Voila! Your changes show up on the Website.
    • Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis
      • Wikis store all your Website's content in an internal hypertext database. The wiki knows about every page you have and about every link you make. If you use a wiki, you don't have to worry about the location of files or the format of your tags. Simply name the page, and the wiki will automatically create a link for you.
    • Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities
      • The original wiki allows anyone to click the Edit button and change the Website. While this may seem odd, many wikis are able to do this successfully without major issues in terms of vandalism. Remember, the wiki stores the history of each page. For each vandal, there are probably ten people who actually need the information that was there before, and who will take the time to click the button and reset the page to its former contents. Many of the wikis handle this challenge differently. Some are completely open, some restrict access, and one even has a democratic error/vandalism reporting system. How you deal with this challenge depends on what you plan to use the Wiki for, as we'll see.
    • Wikis Simplify Site Organization
      • As wikis work like hypertext databases, you can organize your page however you want. Many content management systems require you to plan classifications for your content before you actually create it. This can be helpful, but only if what you want to convey fits a rigid mould. With a wiki, you can organize your page into categories if you want, but you can also try other things. Instead of designing the site structure, many wiki site creators just let the structure grow with the content and the links inside their content. But you don't have to have it either way. I do all three on my own site. Visitors can navigate the site by following a storyline, drilling down through a hierarchy, or they can just browse with the natural flow of the internal links. Without the wiki, such complexity would be a nightmare. Now that I use a wiki, I also find my site structure easier to manage than when I used a template system and a set of categories.
    • Wikis Keep Track of All Your Stuff
      • Because a wiki stores everything in an internal hypertext database, it knows about all your links and all your pages. So it's easy for the wiki to show back links, a list of all the pages that linking to the current page. Since the wiki stores your document history, it can also list recent changes. Advanced wikis like the Wikipedia can even show a list of recent changes to pages that link to the current page.
    • Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis
      • Wikis store all your Website's content in an internal hypertext database. The wiki knows about every page you have and about every link you make. If you use a wiki, you don't have to worry about the location of files or the format of your tags. Simply name the page, and the wiki will automatically create a link for you.
    • Wikis Record Document Histories
      • If you make a mistake, don't worry. A good wiki will save plenty of old copies of your pages and will let you revert to an older version of a page. In fact, many Wikis will display a comparison, called a diffˆ, which shows you the exact changes you have made to your page over time.
    • Wikis Use Simple Markup
      • Even for geeky types like me, thinking about HTML and formatting gets in the way of good, clear writing. Wikis solve this problem by writing the HTML for you -- you only need to learn a few simple markup rules. These rules are designed to make wiki markup easy to write and read by real people.