INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE   OF AIAER   on Internationalizing Higher Education January 28-30, 2008 Sustainable Future of Man...
 
Outline Hypothetical analysis Strategic Questions Sustainable  Development Strategies and Tools Global  Trends <ul><li>Pop...
What is a classical definition of sustainable development? Social/Society Economy Environment Governance issue Traditional...
Reveal profound differences in problems and perspectives… Global Issues Local Issues old rich millions affluence “ global ...
What we Know -  State of the world environment warrants attention     1. Population   (x billion people)   2.5  3.8 5.8 10...
The challenge of sustainable development arises from these two major converging trends. Decline in resource availability a...
World population is increasing to unprecedented levels.
Massive flows of material and energy are used to meet the needs of this expanding population. Source: USGS 1900 1960 1920 ...
These trends are leading to a decline in the health and capacity of natural systems worldwide. <ul><li>Biologists: greates...
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are rising. Carbon Emissions from Fossil Fuel and Cement 0 1000000 2000000 30...
Surface temperatures have warmed over the past century. WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE
At the same time, millions of people worldwide are struggling to meet their basic needs. <ul><li>1.3 billion people live i...
This discussion is framed under the term Sustainable Development, which can be defined several ways. Meeting the needs of ...
Companies evolve in how they manage environmental and related issues . Environmental Compliance Risk Management Sustainabl...
Given the scale and nature of environmental problems, we need new mental models and ways of thinking to solve them. <ul><l...
Developing strategies to pursue sustainable development requires new approaches. <ul><li>Compartmentalized thinking - focu...
Redesigning our industrial system to be sustainable requires a shared framework to understand how nature works. <ul><li>Wh...
An organism’s survival depends on two critical functions from its environment: provision of resources and absorption of wa...
To maintain the integrity of these valuable services, we need to understand how nature works. No Waste <ul><li>Nature work...
In contrast, our industrial system functions primarily in a linear fashion.   Take Make Waste Only 6% of material flow in ...
This industrial system, operating on an ever larger scale, is embedded in and affecting nature’s cycle.
The impact of our expanding industrial system on the environment affects both sources and sinks.   Forests Fisheries Topso...
These impacts can create unexpected barriers for business . 3M decided to phase out production of Scotchguard (2% of annua...
Where is our company potentially vulnerable when considering these impacts? Sources Sinks Are we dependent on a threatened...
How can our company find the opportunity for business growth by reacting proactively to these impacts? <ul><li>How can we ...
Other barriers for business can arise when people feel their needs are not met or they are being treated unfairly.   Testi...
Redesigning our industrial system to be sustainable also requires consideration of business’ role in meeting human and soc...
The Sustainability “Stool” Education for Sustainable Development Environmental  Principles Developing Systems Thinkers Spi...
STUDENT ATTITUDE SKILLS KNOWLEDGE BUILDING CAPACITY for A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
8 <ul><li>ATTITUDE: </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>SKILLS </li></ul><ul>...
2000  UN Millenium Summit Halve  Extreme Poverty Universal Primary Education Empowerment of Women/ gender equality Reduce ...
 
References <ul><li>Video references </li></ul>http://www.wbcsd.org http://www.sustainabletravelinternational.org /
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Sd Conference Aiaer Jan. 2008

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the delicate topic of Sustainable Development through a
book which I have co-authored and give to the audience also a perspective on
how Education can sensitively provide support for this framework.
I will participate in my role of affiliate professor of management and behavior
for Grenoble Graduate School of Business, France ( www.ggsb.com)
by mark esposito (m.esposito@ht.umass.edu)

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  • Sd Conference Aiaer Jan. 2008

    1. 1. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF AIAER on Internationalizing Higher Education January 28-30, 2008 Sustainable Future of Mankind: „ A Roadmap journey “ Mark Esposito, Ph.D. Affiliate Professor of Management & Behavior Grenoble Graduate School of Business mark.esposito@grenoble-em.com
    2. 3. Outline Hypothetical analysis Strategic Questions Sustainable Development Strategies and Tools Global Trends <ul><li>Population increases </li></ul><ul><li>Natural systems decline </li></ul><ul><li>Questions raised by trends </li></ul><ul><li>SD definitions </li></ul><ul><li>New approaches needed </li></ul><ul><li>Eco-efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial ecology </li></ul><ul><li>Design for environment </li></ul><ul><li>Natural Step </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholder engagement/ dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Key performance indicators </li></ul>Sections can be used individually or in combination and tailored as appropriate to any educational program or company’s situation. However, please note that these sections are intended as a resource to supplement internal presentations, rather than as the sole basis for the creation of such presentations.
    3. 4. What is a classical definition of sustainable development? Social/Society Economy Environment Governance issue Traditional domain of political economy (ethics and economy/management) Time dimension Space dimension development seeking to meet the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs Source: Bruntland report (1987) interdependencies
    4. 5. Reveal profound differences in problems and perspectives… Global Issues Local Issues old rich millions affluence “ global people” resource surpluses causes of climate change technological knowledge theory driven research poor, young billions poverty “ local people” resource shortages impacts of climate change traditional knowledge action driven research Digital and capacity divides
    5. 6. What we Know - State of the world environment warrants attention 1. Population (x billion people) 2.5 3.8 5.8 10.7 2. Megacities (>8 million) 2 9 25 200 3. Food (calories/capita) 1980 2450 2770 2200 4. Fisheries (Million ton/yr) 19 58 91 35 5. Water Use (km3/yr) 1300 2600 4200 7500 6. Rainforest (1950=100) 100 85 70 45 7. CO 2 Emissions (billion ton/yr) 1.6 4.9 7.0 14.0 8. Ozone Layer (CFC’s in ppb) – 1.4 3.0 7.0 Source: World Resource Institute, 1996 1950 1972 1997 2050
    6. 7. The challenge of sustainable development arises from these two major converging trends. Decline in resource availability and ecosystems Impact = Population x Consumption x Technology Diminishing margin for action Sustainability
    7. 8. World population is increasing to unprecedented levels.
    8. 9. Massive flows of material and energy are used to meet the needs of this expanding population. Source: USGS 1900 1960 1920 1940 1980 1995 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Millions of Metric Short Tons Raw Materials Consumed in the US -More than all previous societies combined Graph of population growth
    9. 10. These trends are leading to a decline in the health and capacity of natural systems worldwide. <ul><li>Biologists: greatest extinction rate in 63 million years </li></ul><ul><li>Global 50% drop in freshwater available per person </li></ul><ul><li>13 out of 17 fisheries collapsed or endangered </li></ul><ul><li>Forest losses equal to area of UK/year, plus reduced diversity, acid rain etc. </li></ul><ul><li>30-80% topsoil losses significantly reduce diversity, absorptive capacity, and agricultural productivity </li></ul>
    10. 11. Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are rising. Carbon Emissions from Fossil Fuel and Cement 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 6000000 7000000 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Central and South America Africa Far East Centrally Planned Asia Middle East Centrally Planned Europe Oceania Western Europe Germany North America Source: CDIAC
    11. 12. Surface temperatures have warmed over the past century. WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE
    12. 13. At the same time, millions of people worldwide are struggling to meet their basic needs. <ul><li>1.3 billion people live in absolute poverty, with incomes less than $1/day (World Bank) </li></ul><ul><li>841 million people in developing countries suffer from basic protein-energy malnutrition (UN Food and Agriculture Organization) </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 1 billion people either cannot work or are employed in jobs where they cannot support their family (International Labor Organization) </li></ul>11.7% 2.3% 1.9% 1.4% Richest Fifth Poorest Fifth (UNDP, Human Development Report 1992) 82.7% Distribution of Total World Income
    13. 14. This discussion is framed under the term Sustainable Development, which can be defined several ways. Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs <ul><li>The simultaneous pursuit of a triple bottom line: </li></ul><ul><li>Economic prosperity </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental quality </li></ul><ul><li>Social equity </li></ul>A better quality of life for everyone now and for generations to come
    14. 15. Companies evolve in how they manage environmental and related issues . Environmental Compliance Risk Management Sustainable Development “ End-of-pipe” Limit impact of current activities Pollution prevention; Management systems Redesign to eliminate impacts of activities Strategic integration Change activities and design of industrial system
    15. 16. Given the scale and nature of environmental problems, we need new mental models and ways of thinking to solve them. <ul><li>Problems cannot be solved within the mindset that created them . </li></ul><ul><li>Albert Einstein </li></ul>
    16. 17. Developing strategies to pursue sustainable development requires new approaches. <ul><li>Compartmentalized thinking - focused on parts in isolation </li></ul>Traditional Approach Sustainable Approach Systems thinking - focused on interdependence of parts and optimizing whole system Environment/social implications addressed by staff specialist after strategic decisions made Environmental/social implications considered by decision-makers in designing strategy Forecasting: where are we today- how do we improve 5% Backcasting: what would sustainable world look like in 30 years – how do we get there? Company’s position is the way Stakeholder engagement to understand diverse points of view to find better solution
    17. 18. Redesigning our industrial system to be sustainable requires a shared framework to understand how nature works. <ul><li>What are the root causes of why our industrial systems create environmental degradation? </li></ul><ul><li>Where might these environmental trends create a barrier or problem for our business in the future? </li></ul>Understanding these issues can contribute to creating a strategy that avoids these problems and finds the growth opportunity.
    18. 19. An organism’s survival depends on two critical functions from its environment: provision of resources and absorption of wastes. Organism Source Sink <ul><li>Provide resources: </li></ul><ul><li>Water </li></ul><ul><li>Clean air </li></ul><ul><li>Nutrients </li></ul>Absorb wastes and by products The same principle applies at larger scales, e.g., to an company, industry, or economy. Environment
    19. 20. To maintain the integrity of these valuable services, we need to understand how nature works. No Waste <ul><li>Nature works in cycles </li></ul><ul><li>There is no waste - what is unused by one species becomes nutrients for the next </li></ul><ul><li>The sun’s energy drives the process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Green celled plants using photosynthesis create net concentration and structure </li></ul></ul>
    20. 21. In contrast, our industrial system functions primarily in a linear fashion. Take Make Waste Only 6% of material flow in ends up in products Source: Hawken, Lovins, Natural Capitalism Take “natural capital,” structured valuable material, and process it into unusable waste
    21. 22. This industrial system, operating on an ever larger scale, is embedded in and affecting nature’s cycle.
    22. 23. The impact of our expanding industrial system on the environment affects both sources and sinks. Forests Fisheries Topsoil Groundwater Freshwater CO 2 NOx Synthetic compounds (CFC’s, DDT) Urban development Deforestation Desertification Sources Key resource bases are being exploited at rates faster than their ability to regenerate. Sinks The available land area where nature can break down and recycle wastes is shrinking. The quantity and types of wastes created by industrial societies cannot be fully absorbed and recycled by nature. Economy Environment
    23. 24. These impacts can create unexpected barriers for business . 3M decided to phase out production of Scotchguard (2% of annual sales) after finding trace amounts in blood samples of people and wildlife worldwide, even in countries where the product was never sold or manufactured. ($1 million charge against earnings in 2000) An activist group has convinced 250 major companies to commit to phasing out all purchases of old growth forest products. At BHP’s large copper mine in Papa New Guinea, mine tailings have drained into a river for 15 years. This has led to class action legal claims and public scrutiny. Shell faced NGO outrage and consumer boycotts of its gas stations over its decision to dispose the Brent Spar oil platform at sea.
    24. 25. Where is our company potentially vulnerable when considering these impacts? Sources Sinks Are we dependent on a threatened or sensitive natural resource? <ul><li>What “sinks” are we dependent on that may reach capacity, for example: </li></ul><ul><li>Global atmosphere? </li></ul><ul><li>Local air quality? </li></ul><ul><li>Human/wildlife capacity </li></ul><ul><li>to absorb toxic substances? </li></ul>Economy Environment
    25. 26. How can our company find the opportunity for business growth by reacting proactively to these impacts? <ul><li>How can we help customers who may be facing a “sink” or waste limit, e.g., using waste as alternative fuels? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we use more closed-loop production processes to save energy, water, or materials? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we collaborate with other industrial partners to operate our industrial system in a cyclic way? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we increase productive land area and improve biodiversity? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we be strategic about using emission trading schemes to gain business advantage? </li></ul>
    26. 27. Other barriers for business can arise when people feel their needs are not met or they are being treated unfairly. Testimonial: http://www.wbcsd.org/web/stream/sl/procter/pur.html Global human rights groups and labor organizations are focusing increased attention on corporate practices. The Internet can be used to quickly disseminate information about corporate practices worldwide. Shell was the subject of condemnation and boycotts by NGOs associated with its operations in Nigeria. It was viewed as having complicit involvement in the violations of human rights by state security forces and the lack of economic benefits of oil production for local communities.
    27. 28. Redesigning our industrial system to be sustainable also requires consideration of business’ role in meeting human and societal needs. <ul><li>How does our company contribute to the health of the communities it operates in? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the social responsibilities of our business and how effectively are we fulfilling these? </li></ul><ul><li>How can our business find opportunity in serving markets where basic human needs are not met? </li></ul><ul><li>How can our company differentiate itself in how it treats it workers to attract and retain talented employees? </li></ul>
    28. 29. The Sustainability “Stool” Education for Sustainable Development Environmental Principles Developing Systems Thinkers Spiritual Principles Social Principles Economic Principles
    29. 30. STUDENT ATTITUDE SKILLS KNOWLEDGE BUILDING CAPACITY for A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    30. 31. 8 <ul><li>ATTITUDE: </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>SKILLS </li></ul><ul><li>Integral approach </li></ul><ul><li>Application oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Systemic </li></ul><ul><li>Communicative </li></ul><ul><li>KNOWLEDGE </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Culture ( Behavior, Need-orientation) </li></ul><ul><li>Structure (Institutions, Economy etc) </li></ul>BUILDING CAPACITY for A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    31. 32. 2000 UN Millenium Summit Halve Extreme Poverty Universal Primary Education Empowerment of Women/ gender equality Reduce <5 mortality by 2/3 Reduce maternal mortality by 3/4 Reverse spread of diseases, esp. HIV/AIDS, Malaria Ensure Environmental Sustainability Form a Global Development Partnership for aid, trade, debt relief Millennium Development Goals by 2015 Background/ History cont’d…
    32. 34. References <ul><li>Video references </li></ul>http://www.wbcsd.org http://www.sustainabletravelinternational.org /

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