Byron She Walks in Beauty

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Byron She Walks in Beauty

  1. 1. She Walks in Beauty Lord Byron (George Gordon)
  2. 2. Lord Byron• 1788 – 1824• Born in London to a noble family but had little money – father died when he was three• At the age of ten he inherited his great uncle’s title, baron and moved to the estate in Nottingham
  3. 3. Lord Byron• Studied at Trinity College at Cambridge• Very popular, played sports and spent money• After graduating traveled Europe and Middle East• Returned with poems – “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” – a young, moody, sensitive and reckless hero – very much like him• He became an overnight sensation
  4. 4. Lord Byron• He was a celebrity and was as known as a “bad boy” – numerous debts and love affairs• Byron was very charming but also became associated with the “Byronic Hero” – dark brooding hero, impassioned by a cause – portrayed in his poems• His marriage broke up and he fled the scandal - left England for Italy – never to return• In 1823 he joined a group of revolutionaries trying to free Greece from Turkish rule, while there he contracted rheumatic fever and died
  5. 5. She Walks in Beauty• Byron uses a great deal of imagery to describe this woman• “She walks in beauty like the night” – simile – Byron turns “night”, which is usually a symbol of darkness and death, into something beautiful• Uses alliteration to call attention to the light/dark images – “cloudless climes”, “starry skies” , “day denies”, “serenely sweet”- and her beauty
  6. 6. She Walks in Beauty• “tender light” – is something you feel, light is something you see – uses the 2 senses• “Which heaven to gaudy day denies” – personification is used twice – heaven can’t deny anything and the day can’t be gaudy• It is a poem of polarities – light and dark• “cloudless climes and starry skies”• “dark and bright”
  7. 7. She Walks in Beauty• “One shade the more, one ray the less” – these cancel each other out and really suggest that there is a balance to the dark and light and this is really what beauty is all about• “raven tress” – is a metaphor – this is unusual because at the time pale blonds were the standard of beauty – Byron states that the dark hair makes her face lighter – more beautiful
  8. 8. She Walks in Beauty• This outside beauty is a reflection of her inside beauty – “Where thoughts serenely sweet express/How pure, how dear their dwelling place[metaphor]” – personifies thoughts – they don’t speak – uses a metaphor for her mind• “smiles” and “tints” “tell of days in goodness spent” – personification
  9. 9. She Walks in Beauty• “A heart whose love is innocent” – personification – love or the heart can’t be innocent• The main theme is beauty or the woman’s appearance• By focusing solely on her beauty Byron creates an image of perfect balance dark/light and also of inner beauty• Byron objectifies the woman – he judges her on her appearance and leads the reader to believe that the balance of light/dark makes her perfect with out providing any details about who she really is and what she is really like
  10. 10. She Walks in Beauty• “A heart whose love is innocent” – personification – love or the heart can’t be innocent• The main theme is beauty or the woman’s appearance• By focusing solely on her beauty Byron creates an image of perfect balance dark/light and also of inner beauty• Byron objectifies the woman – he judges her on her appearance and leads the reader to believe that the balance of light/dark makes her perfect with out providing any details about who she really is and what she is really like

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