The nine tribes of the internet
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  • TITLE: The nine tribes of the internet SUBJECT: Lee will cover the latest findings of the Pew Internet & American Life Project about broadband adoption and wireless connectivity. He will explore why government agencies, associations, activists, and businesses should use different digital strategies to serve the needs of each tribe. Title: Who loves the internet and who doesn't Subject: Lee will run through the latest research of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, especially the Project's new market segmentation analysis that shows 10 different kinds of technology users. He will discuss how webmanagers can do their work in an environment where users have different needs and expectations.

The nine tribes of the internet The nine tribes of the internet Presentation Transcript

  • THE NINE TRIBES OF THE INTERNET Lee Rainie – Director Pew Internet Project Washington Webmanagers Washington, D.C. June 10, 2009
  • New information ecosystem: Then and Now Industrial Age Info was: Scarce Expensive Institutionally oriented Designed for consumption Information Age Info is: Abundant Cheap Personally oriented Designed for participation
  • 2000 46% of adults use internet 5% with broadband at home 50% own a cell phone 0% connect to internet wirelessly <10% use “cloud” = slow, stationary connections built around my computer The internet is the asteroid: Then and now 2008 >75% of adults use internet >60% with broadband at home 85% own a cell phone 54% connect to internet wirelessly >53% use “cloud” = fast, mobile connections built around outside servers and storage
  • Ecosystem changes
    • Volume of information grows
    • Variety of information increases
    • Velocity of information speeds up
    • The times and places to experience media enlarge
    • People’s vigilance for information expands AND contracts
  • Ecosystem changes
    • The immersive qualities of media are more compelling
    • Relevance of information improves
    • The number of information “voices” explodes – and becomes more findable
    • Voting and ventilating are enabled
    • Social networks are more vivid
  • Behold Homo Connectus
    • A different species with a different sense of …
    • Expectation about access to info, availability of info, and “findability” of info
    • Time use
    • Place, distance, presence (more and less tied together)
    • The possibilities of work, learning, and play
    • Personal efficacy and personal effort
    • The rewards and challenges of networking for social, economic, political, and cultural purposes
  • A general new pattern of communication and influence – the 4 As
    • attention
    • acquisition
    • assessment
    • action
  • How do you….
    • get his/her attention?
      • leverage your traditional platforms
      • offer alerts, updates, feeds
      • be available in relevant places
      • find pathways through his/her social network
  • How do you….
    • help him/her acquire information?
      • be findable in a “long tail” world
      • pursue new distribution methods
      • offer “link love” for selfish reasons – you want joint referrals
      • participate in conversations about your work
  • How do you….
    • help him/her assess information?
      • honor the ethics of your kind of data and culture
      • be transparent, link-friendly, and archive everything
      • aggregate the best related work
      • when you make mistakes seek forgiveness
  • How do you….
    • assist him/her act on information?
      • offer opportunities for feedback
      • offer opportunities for remixing and mash-ups
      • offer opportunities for community building
      • be open to the wisdom of crowds
  • New tech-user typology
  • Overall picture
    • 39% are motivated by mobility
    • 5 groups that are being drawn into deeper use thanks to mobile connections
    • Wireless connections prompt them to use the internet more and feel better and better about its role in their lives
    • Self expression and networking matters to them, but some have mixed feelings
    • 61% are tied to stationary media
    • 5 groups that do not feel the pull of mobility – or anything else – drawing them deeper in the digital world
    • Some have lots of technology, but it is relatively peripheral in their lives.
    • They have plateaued in internet use and enthusiasm -- or are on the outskirts of digital life
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 1 Digital collaborators (8% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • With the most tech assets, Digital Collaborators use them to work with and share their creations with others.
    • The lead the pack in every dimension of our analysis: assets, actions, attitudes towards technology.
    • Always-on broadband and always-present cell connection is key to their lives.
    • These veteran users are enthusiastic about how ICTs help them connect with others and confident in how to manage digital devices and information.
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 1 Digital collaborators (8% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Male: 56%
    • Median age: 39
    • Race: Diverse
    • Education: 61% college +
    • Household income: 53% make > $75K
    • Employment status: 70% employed FT
    • Community type: 52% suburb; 36% urb.
    • Funky facts: 12 years online
            • 73% married
            • 51% parents minor children
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 1 Digital collaborators (8% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Be a place for them to jack into the grid
    • Give them the tools to collaborate and share
    • Enlist their help in giving you coaching and feedback on the experiments with technology you want to try
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 2 Ambivalent networkers (7% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Ambivalent Networkers have folded mobile devices into how they run their social lives, whether though texting or social networking tools online.
    • They tie for first or take second in all assets and actions categories.
    • They also rely on ICTs for entertainment.
    • But they also express worries about connectivity; and some find that mobile devices are intrusive.
    • Many think it is good to take a break from online use.
    • Their keyword about technology might be “obligation” – can’t afford to be off the grid, even though they want to be.
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 2 Ambivalent networkers (7% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Male: 60%
    • Median age: 29 (youngest)
    • Race: Little more minority than DigCollab.
    • Education: 23% college +
    • Household income: 44% make < $50K
    • Employment status: 64% employed FT
    • Community type: 44% suburb; 45% urb.
    • Funky facts: 30% are students
            • 34% are NOT email users
            • 83% are cell texters
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 2 Ambivalent networkers (7% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Be a sanctuary – and a place where they have permission to go offline
    • Think about ways to reach them through games -- 54% of them own video game console
    • Help them figure out the new etiquette of online social networking -- 54% have SNS profile
    • Help them navigate information overload
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 3 Media movers (7% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Media Movers have a wide range of online and mobile habits, and they are bound to find or create an information nugget, such as a digital photo, and pass it on.
    • These social exchanges are central to this group’s use of ICTs – rather than work-related uses.
    • Cyberspace, as a path to personal productivity or an outlet for creativity, is less important.
    • They are not into online content creation the way Digital Collaborators are, yet they are big-time sharers.
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 3 Media movers (7% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Male: 56%
    • Median age: 34 (second youngest)
    • Race: Diverse
    • Education: 32% college+ (average)
    • Household income: 56% make > $50K
    • Employment status: 70% employed FT
    • Community type: 55% suburb; 30% urb.
    • Funky facts: 31% record video on cell
            • 87% own dig. camera
            • 90% online health seekers
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 3 Media movers (7% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Help them find outlets for sharing their creations – maybe simple mashup tools
    • Help them navigate to material that they can pass along to others
    • They are socializers, so social networking is a “making connections” experience for them and your material is social currency for them
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 4 Roving nodes (9% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Roving Nodes are active managers of their social and work lives using their mobile device.
    • They get the most out of basic applications with their assets – such as email or texting – and find them great for arranging the logistics of their lives and enhancing personal productivity.
    • They love email and texting, but are too busy to blog or create other content.
    • Think “working Little League mother”, or caregiver for aging parent when you think of Roving Nodes
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 4 Roving nodes (9% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Female: 56%
    • Median age: 39
    • Race: Diverse > Latino
    • Education: 44% college+ (2nd highest)
    • Household income: 52% make > $50K
    • Employment status: 68% employed FT
    • Community type: 48% suburb; 39% urb.
    • Funky facts: 100% have cell phones
            • heavy internet use at home and work – hard to give up
            • say tech gives them control
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 4 Roving nodes (9% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Help them be efficient generally – and especially as parents
    • Transactions online help – as do “push” functions like alerts, reminders
    • Give them access to technology so they can check in and check up on things
    • Cloud functions are particularly useful to them
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 5 Mobile newbies (8% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • This group rates low on tech assets, but its members really like their cell phones.
    • Mobile Newbies, many of whom acquired a cell in the past year, like how the device helps them be more available to others.
    • The act of getting a cell phone was like a conversion experience for them in the way it opened up the world.
    • They would be hard pressed to give up the cell phone. And they express general support for the role technology can play in people’s lives even though most do NOT use the internet.
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 5 Mobile newbies (8% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Female: 55%
    • Median age: 50 (oldest MBM group)
    • Race: A bit weighted to minorities
    • Education: 72% HS or less
    • Household income: 45% make <$40K
    • Employment status: 53% employed FT
    • Community type: 24% rural
    • Funky facts: just 39%=internet users 46% use computers
            • none create internet content
            • love new connectedness
  • Motivated by mobility – Group 5 Mobile newbies (8% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Offer “how-to” material, coaching, and mentoring
    • Offer technology access and then offer tech support
    • Offer pathways to the wonders of the web. They are just getting their feet wet and do not know much about the useful and fun stuff they can find online
  • Stationary media majority – Group 1 Desktop veterans (13% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • This group of older, veteran online users is content to use a high-speed connection and a desktop computer to explore the internet and stay in touch with friends.
    • They are happy to be connected with they are stationary and sitting. So, they place their cell phone and mobile applications in the background.
    • For them, online life hit its zenith about 3-5 years ago when they first got broadband connections.
    • And their 2004 cell phone still serves its primary purpose for them – making phone calls.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 1 Desktop veterans (13% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Male: 55%
    • Median age: 46
    • Race: Skews white
    • Education: 41% college+ (3 rd highest)
    • Household income: 32% make >$75K
    • Employment status: 56% employed FT
    • Community type: 52% sub.; 30% urb.
    • Funky facts: just 77% have cells
            • int. user 10.5 years
            • heavy int. users at home and work
            • average content creators
  • Stationary media majority – Group 1 Desktop veterans (13% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Offer them access to good computers with good connections
    • They are self sufficient and don’t need a lot of hand holding on search and browsing – the kind of people who will use self-serve transactions
    • May want help/tutorials with content creation (social media) and new applications
  • Stationary media majority – Group 2 Drifting surfers (14% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Many have the requisite tech assets, such as broadband or a cell phone, but Drifting Surfers are infrequent online users.
    • They also are not big fans of mobile connectivity.
    • When they use technology, it is for basic information gathering.
    • It wouldn’t bother the typical Drifting Surfer to give up the internet or cell phone.
    • Likely to be secondary user of technology in household.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 2 Drifting surfers (14% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Female: 56%
    • Median age: 42
    • Race: Diverse
    • Education: 33% college+; 33% HS
    • Household income: 46% make >$50K
    • Employment status: 66% employed FT
    • Community type: 46% sub.; 35% urb.
    • Funky facts: 85% have home broadbd 86% have cells
            • below aver. tech user
            • tech doesn’t help much 46%=“good to take break”
  • Stationary media majority – Group 2 Drifting surfers (14% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Don’t force-feed them tech applications
    • Your traditional services are what most appeals to them about you
    • Tech support might be appealing – they report problems with gadgetry that prompts them to give up hope
  • Stationary media majority – Group 3 Information encumbered (10% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Most people in this group suffer from information overload and think taking time off from the internet is a good thing.
    • Their attitudes about the role of technology in the world have worsened since 2006 and they see no great benefits from technology in their personal lives.
    • The Information Encumbered are firmly rooted in old media to get information and communicate.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 3 Information encumbered (10% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Male: 67% (highest)
    • Median age: 53
    • Race: Skews white
    • Education: 33% college+; 37% HS
    • Household income: 42% make <$40K
    • Employment status: 40% employed FT
    • Community type: 48% urb; 20% rural
    • Funky facts: 99% are int. users
            • 75% are cell users
            • only 52% online typ. day 52% feel overloaded
            • 62% need help new gad.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 3 Information encumbered (10% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Sympathize that the world is changing rapidly
    • Don’t force technology and tech solutions on them
    • Be their filters for information and navigators to information
    • They will appreciate classic reference and info retrieval methods
    • Be a referral service for them in a stressful economy
  • Stationary media majority – Group 4 Tech indifferent (10% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Members of this group are not heavy internet users.
    • Although most have cell phones, they don’t like their intrusiveness.
    • The Indifferent could easily do without modern gadgets and services. They are too much trouble with too little payoff.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 4 Tech indifferent (10% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Female: 55%
    • Median age: 59 (2 nd oldest)
    • Race: Diverse (little higher Af-Am)
    • Education: 73% HS or less
    • Household income: 59% make <$50K
    • Employment status: 34% employed FT
    • Community type: 26% rural
    • Funky facts: just 39% are int. users
            • 46% computer users but 86% are cell users
            • least likely users of everything
  • Stationary media majority – Group 4 Tech indifferent (10% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • They see no benefits in technology because it is not relevant to their lives – at home or work
    • Lots of them say they are discouraged and confused when technology doesn’t work
    • Gentle tutorials might ease their views – internet 101
    • Public access – libraries and govt offices -- might be their only lifeline to digital age, but you have to make case technology can help
  • Stationary media majority – Group 5 Off the net (14% of population)
    • Tech lifestyle attributes
    • Members of this group have neither cell phones nor online access, and tend to be older and low-income.
    • Some have experience with ICTs. They used to have online access and as many as one in five used to have a cell phone.
    • But it broke, or didn’t provide much enhancement to their worlds, so they did not return to using the technology.
  • Stationary media majority – Group 5 Off the net (14% of population)
    • Demographics
    • Female: 57% (highest)
    • Median age: 67 (oldest)
    • Race: Skews to minorities
    • Education: 80% HS or less
    • Household income: 38% make <$20K
    • Employment status: 17% employed FT
    • Community type: 30% rural
    • Funky facts: just 16% have desktop or laptop
            • they see no lifestyle improvements with technology
  • Stationary media majority – Group 5 Off the net (14% of population)
    • How to be a node in their network
    • Traditional services are most essential and useful to them
    • Community activities and socializing opportunities are probably their biggest needs from local institutions
    • Computer 101 and Internet 101 courses might draw some of them to your library
  • Final action item: Think/act like journalists
    • Can be your own story teller – and must be your own news hub
    • Embrace new distribution platforms and strategies (e.g. aggregation, curation)
    • Be ready for your close up
    • Behave like a friend and be a node in social networks
  • Thank you!
    • Lee Rainie
    • Director
    • Pew Internet & American Life Project
    • 1615 L Street NW
    • Suite 700
    • Washington, DC 20036
    • Email: [email_address]
    • Twitter: http://twitter.com/lrainie
    • 202-419-4500