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Backpacking and Hiking
The Appalachian Trail
Backpacking and Hiking
The Appalachian Trail
Backpacking and Hiking
The Appalachian Trail
          Laila Poche
(blueridgeoutdoors.com/current-issue/great-falls-national-park-va/)




    Backpacking and Hiking
The Appalachian Trail
 ...
Outline
Backpacking and Hiking
Outline   The AT
          Preparation
          On the Trail
          The Experience
          My...
(purebound.com)




                  Backpacking and
                      Hiking
Backpacking and hiking




                    (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling ...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?




                    (O’Bannon, Allen. Alle...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
Backpacking and hiking


                              What is Backpacking?
                                   Backpacking...
The
Appalachian
   Trail



              (purebound.com)
The AT
• About 2,178 miles long (the
  nations largest marked
  footpath)
  • Touches 14 states




                      ...
The AT



• from Springer
  Mountain, Georgia to       (thebody.com/content/art12597.html)



  Mt. Katahdin, Maine




  ...
The AT
• Harpers Ferry, West
  Virginia
  • The “half-way point”
  • Location of the
    Appalachian Trail
    Conservancy...
The At
• The International AT
 • Extended into eastern
   Canada in the 1990’s
 • about 750 miles in
   Quebec, New       ...
HISTORY

•   Benton MacKaye

    •   “convinced that the pace of
        urban and industrial life along
        the East ...
Why Hike the AT?


• The Challenge
 • The Rough Terrain
   • Main and New      (mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker)

    ...
Before going on
    the trip
Prepping Physically for
        the Trail
• Hiking (Practicing)
  • Around local parks or the neighborhood
    • Also lets...
Muscles
                                  Used




(blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/
muscle.2.jpg)
Muscles
                                  Used
                                 Abdominals




(blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resour...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                 Abdominals




(blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resour...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                 Abdominals




(blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resour...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                 Abdominals




(blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resour...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Muscles
                                  Used
                                   Abdominals
                             ...
Packing
WHAT TO PACK
dehydrated
   food

             WHAT TO PACK
dehydrated
     food

a lightweight   WHAT TO PACK
sleeping bag
dehydrated
                               a tent
     food

a lightweight   WHAT TO PACK
sleeping bag
dehydrated
                                   a tent
     food

                WHAT TO PACK   a mess-kit
a lightweight
sl...
dehydrated
                                            a tent
     food
                      a few clothing items
       ...
a first-aid kit


  dehydrated
                                            a tent
     food
                      a few clo...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
     and                               a first-aid kit
 toothpaste

  dehydrated
                               ...
toothbrush
      and                                    a first-aid kit
  toothpaste

   dehydrated         a small wash cl...
toothbrush
      and                                     a first-aid kit
  toothpaste

   dehydrated          a small wash ...
toothbrush
      and                                     a first-aid kit
  toothpaste
                sun screen
   dehydra...
toothbrush
      and                                     a first-aid kit
  toothpaste
                sun screen
   dehydra...
toothbrush
      and                                     a first-aid kit
  toothpaste
                sun screen
   dehydra...
toothbrush
      and                                     a first-aid kit
  toothpaste
                sun screen           ...
toothbrush
                              comb or hairbrush
      and                                   a first-aid kit
  to...
toothbrush
                               comb or hairbrush
       and a small stove                       a first-aid kit
...
toothbrush
                               comb or hairbrush
       and a small stove                       a first-aid kit
...
toothbrush
                               comb or hairbrush
       and a small stove                       a first-aid kit
...
toothbrush
                               comb or hairbrush
       and a small stove                       a first-aid kit
...
How to Pack
How to Pack


    • Compress
How to Pack


    • Compress
    • Eliminate unnecessary things
How to Pack


    • Compress
    • Eliminate unnecessary things
    • Avoid bulging, keep the pack
      stream line
How to Pack


    • Compress
    • Eliminate unnecessary things
    • Avoid bulging, keep the pack
      stream line
    •...
campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
     first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
Packing




          campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
               first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
     first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
     first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
First Aid Kit




                campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
                     first-aid-kit-for-your-...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves




                                  campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect-
       ...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield




                                      campingtourist.com/camping-...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
First Aid Kit


•   Exam gloves

•   CPR face shield

•   Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive
    band...
On the Trail
          (blueridgeoutdoors.com/departments/great-falls-national-park-va/)
On the Trail
          (blueridgeoutdoors.com/departments/great-falls-national-park-va/)
Some Terms You Might
       Want to Know
• Through Hiking/Through-Hiking: n. hike of the
  Trail’s entire length in one se...
Courtesies and
Responsibilities
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
 • Picking up trash
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
 • Picking up trash
 • Collecting fallen...
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
 • Picking up trash
 • Collecting fallen...
Courtesies and
           Responsibilities


• Leave No Trace
 • Staying on Trail
 • Picking up trash
 • Collecting fallen...
Courtesies and
       Responsibilities

• If you’ve gotta go...
  • Use a shovel to make a hole at least 6 in.
    deep
  ...
Signs
Signs

Trail Blazers
Signs

Trail Blazers
Signs

Trail Blazers
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Warning Signs
Signs

Trail Blazers
    Appalachian Trail- white

    Water Spring- blue
Warning Signs
Views
Water




        (purebound.com)
Water
• Unfortunately today
  we cant drink right out
  of the steams anymore
  • Bacteria can cause
    hikers to become
...
Water
• Unfortunately today
  we cant drink right out
  of the steams anymore
  • Bacteria can cause
    hikers to become
...
Shelters
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Shelters
•   General Rules to Shelters

    •   Keep your food out of reach to
        animals, especially if there is a b...
Wildlife

• Animals can rip into packs
  and tents
  • Raccoons, Bears, Deer,
    Chipmunks
  • Avoid them by hanging
    ...
Wildlife

  Bears
             Moose
                       Wild Ponies
Raccoons


           Deer
Terrain
• Northern Bolders
  • New Hampshire and Vermont
• Rocky
  • Pennsylvania
• Flat with Hills
• Through crossing ste...
Application Component



• A hiking trip of the Appalachian Trail in
  Pennsylvania
Application Component
Class Activity
Class Activity
Works Cited
Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
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Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche

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Backpacking and Hiking the Appalachian Trail

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  • Title Slide
  • Title Slide
  • Title Slide
  • Title Slide
  • Outline slide of presentation:
    An explanation of what backpacking is and what hiking is
    An explanation of what the Appalachian Trail is and facts about it
    Information of how to prepare for a backpacking trip, particularly an AT trip
    Insight into wildlifegeneral courtesies and responsibilities that are expected of hikers on the AT
    Why people hike the AT and why it’s unique
    An explanation of my application and what happened
    After talking about my presentation I will do the class activity
  • photo: purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries.
    People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered.


    photo:purebound.com
  • Intro slide to backpacking and hiking
    What is backpacking?
    How is it different from hiking?
    Why it’s done
    Its challenges

    photo: purebound.com
  • The Appalachian Trail is the nation's longest marked footpath, at approximately 2,178 miles. The path travels from Mt. Katahdin, Maine to Springer Mountain, Georgia; touching 14 states total. Dubbed a privately managed national park the AT crosses six other national park system and eight national forests. The AT is maintained by 30 trail clubs and multiple partnerships; more than 6,000 volunteers contribute about 200,000 hours to the Appalachian Trail every year. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    It takes approximately 5 million footsteps to walk the entire length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)

    The general half-way point is at Harpers Ferry, WV. Here the Appalachian Trail Conservancy “preserves and manages of the natural, scenic, historic, and cultural resources associated with the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in order to provide primitive outdoor-recreation and educational opportunities for Trail visitors.” (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)

    photo: Appalachian Trail Conservancy




  • The Appalachian Trail was founded by Benton MacKaye; he was “convinced that the pace of urban and industrial life along the East Coast was harmful to people.” (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). So he envisioned the A.T. as a path interspersed with planned wilderness communities where people could go to renew themselves. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). That idea never gained much traction, but the notion of a thousand-mile footpath in the mountains fired the imaginations of hikers and outdoorsmen from Maine to Georgia. Inspired by him, they began building trails and trying to connect them. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    The trail was completed in 1937. It fell into disrepair during World War II, when Trail maintainers were unable to work on it, and parts of the route were lost. After the war, a concerted effort was made to restore it, and it was once again declared complete in 1951. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    Arthur Perkins (an ex-judge) and Myron Avery (lawyer). (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    Both rekindled the idea of the Trail in 1928 and 1929 by using MacKaye's ideas to recruit volunteers, establishing hiking clubs up and down the coast, and actually going out to hike, clear brush, and mark paths themselves. When Perkins' health failed in the early 1930s, Avery took over, establishing a network of volunteers, developing clubs, working with the government, building the organization of the ATC, and setting the Trail's northern terminus at Katahdin in his native Maine. Avery remained chairman of ATC until 1952. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    At first, the goal was to blaze a connected route so that the Trail led along old forest roads and other trails. Trail maintainers mostly just cleared brush and painted blazes. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). “Today's Trail has mostly been moved off the old roads and onto new paths dug and reinforced especially for hikers. Today's route, though engineered much more elaborately, often requires more climbing, because it leads up the sides of many mountains that the old woods roads bypassed.” (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    photo: www.mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker

  • Since the completion of the trail people have embraced MacKaye’s philosophy and hiked the AT to get away from the hectic of the urban world. (AT VIDEO).
    “More than 10,000 people have reported hiking the length of the Trail.”(Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    Through-Hiking: n. hike of the Trail’s entire length in one season
    Section Hiking: v. The approach to walking the length of the Trail in segments

    “Because the A.T. spans a great variety of terrain, ranging from relatively flat and easy, to extremely arduous, the following scale was created as a general guide:
    1=Flat
    5=Strenuous ups and downs, only occasional flat sections
    10=Use of hands required, footing precarious — not recommended for those with fear of heights and not in good physical condition.”
    (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    “Maine: 3-10, New Hampshire: 6-10”

    picture: www.mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker


  • Preparation for backpacking, hiking the AT
    physically
    health
    what to pack
    how to pack
    special for through-hikers
  • It’s important to practice hiking and backpacking before you start your endeavor on the AT. Some good places to practice are local parks and around the neighborhood. This “warmup” is a perfect opportunity to break in your boots and become accustomed to your pack. The terrain on the AT is much more demanding than your local foot path so it’d important to build leg muscle before going on the trail. This will also prevent injuries; like sprains, or pulled muscles. The most common injuries that occur on the AT evolve the knee, hamstrings, and back; so if you have preexisting problems with these areas it’s important to take care of them by stretching or seeing your doctor for a brace of some sort.
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it’s just not walking; you’re using all sorts of muscles.

    (Berger, Karen. Hiking and Backpacking: A Complete Guide)
    photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you’ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general?
    dehydrated or food that doesn't need to be refrigerated,
    a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space),
    a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly),
    a mess-kit (to cook your food in)
    a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts)
    a first aid kit
    toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared)
    a rain coat
    2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking)
    sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective)
    extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it’s important to keep you feet dry, there’s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper)
    toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there’s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper)
    however there’s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space)
    a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often)
    a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or “oven mitt”)
    a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes)
    sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty)
    bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia)
    cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item)
    deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable)
    a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better)
    a small stove (it’s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there’s rain)
    matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove)
    a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse)
    and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella)
    (Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking )
  • Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking
  • Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking
  • Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking
  • Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking
  • Berger, Karen. Backpacking and Hiking













  • responsibilities and courtesies of the trail
    terrain
    wildlife
    cautions
    shelters and towns
    signs
    water sources
    trail magic- what is it, why it’s awesome









  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail.
    These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path
    photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/










  • Houses more than 2,000 occurrences of rare, threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species at about 535 sites.








  • Transcript of "Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche"

    1. 1. Backpacking and Hiking The Appalachian Trail
    2. 2. Backpacking and Hiking The Appalachian Trail
    3. 3. Backpacking and Hiking The Appalachian Trail Laila Poche
    4. 4. (blueridgeoutdoors.com/current-issue/great-falls-national-park-va/) Backpacking and Hiking The Appalachian Trail Laila Poche
    5. 5. Outline
    6. 6. Backpacking and Hiking Outline The AT Preparation On the Trail The Experience My Application
    7. 7. (purebound.com) Backpacking and Hiking
    8. 8. Backpacking and hiking (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    9. 9. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    10. 10. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    11. 11. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    12. 12. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    13. 13. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? It’s allows people to separate themselves from the rest of the world (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    14. 14. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? It’s allows people to separate themselves from the rest of the world Nature (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    15. 15. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? It’s allows people to separate themselves from the rest of the world Nature Going at you’re own pace (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    16. 16. Backpacking and hiking What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? It’s allows people to separate themselves from the rest of the world Nature Going at you’re own pace The Challenge (O’Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (purebound.com) (purebound.com)
    17. 17. The Appalachian Trail (purebound.com)
    18. 18. The AT • About 2,178 miles long (the nations largest marked footpath) • Touches 14 states (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
    19. 19. The AT • from Springer Mountain, Georgia to (thebody.com/content/art12597.html) Mt. Katahdin, Maine (purebound.com)
    20. 20. The AT • Harpers Ferry, West Virginia • The “half-way point” • Location of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (purebound.com) (channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/appalachian- trail-3591/Photos)
    21. 21. The At • The International AT • Extended into eastern Canada in the 1990’s • about 750 miles in Quebec, New (agiweb.org/geotimes/mar08/article.html?id=geomedia.html) Brunswick and Newfoundland
    22. 22. HISTORY • Benton MacKaye • “convinced that the pace of urban and industrial life along the East Coast was harmful to people.” (AT.org). • Arthur Perkins and Myron Avery • Fully completed in 1951 • Earl Shaffer • first man to hike the entire Appalachian Trail in one continuous trip (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker)
    23. 23. Why Hike the AT? • The Challenge • The Rough Terrain • Main and New (mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker) Hampshire • To Get Away
    24. 24. Before going on the trip
    25. 25. Prepping Physically for the Trail • Hiking (Practicing) • Around local parks or the neighborhood • Also lets you break in your boots and get to know your pack • Strengthening leg muscle • Injuries • Knee • Hamstrings • Back
    26. 26. Muscles Used (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    27. 27. Muscles Used Abdominals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    28. 28. Muscles Used Abdominals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    29. 29. Muscles Used Abdominals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    30. 30. Muscles Used Abdominals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    31. 31. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    32. 32. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    33. 33. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    34. 34. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    35. 35. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    36. 36. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    37. 37. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    38. 38. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    39. 39. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    40. 40. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    41. 41. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    42. 42. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    43. 43. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    44. 44. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    45. 45. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    46. 46. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    47. 47. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    48. 48. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps Calves (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    49. 49. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps Calves (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    50. 50. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps Calves (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    51. 51. Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps Calves (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
    52. 52. Packing
    53. 53. WHAT TO PACK
    54. 54. dehydrated food WHAT TO PACK
    55. 55. dehydrated food a lightweight WHAT TO PACK sleeping bag
    56. 56. dehydrated a tent food a lightweight WHAT TO PACK sleeping bag
    57. 57. dehydrated a tent food WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag
    58. 58. dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag
    59. 59. a first-aid kit dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag
    60. 60. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag
    61. 61. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a rain coat
    62. 62. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder
    63. 63. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder
    64. 64. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals extra hiking socks a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder
    65. 65. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items toilet paper WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals extra hiking socks a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder
    66. 66. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items toilet paper WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals extra hiking socks a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder duct tape
    67. 67. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a tent food a few clothing items toilet paper WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder duct tape
    68. 68. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag sandals extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder duct tape
    69. 69. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder duct tape
    70. 70. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles and a bladder duct tape
    71. 71. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray and a bladder duct tape
    72. 72. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray and a bladder duct tape
    73. 73. toothbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray and a bladder duct tape
    74. 74. toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray and a bladder duct tape
    75. 75. toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a small stove a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray and a bladder duct tape
    76. 76. toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a small stove a first-aid kit toothpaste sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
    77. 77. toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a small stove a first-aid kit toothpaste a water purifier sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
    78. 78. toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a small stove a first-aid kit toothpaste a water purifier sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit a lightweight sleeping bag a bandana and hat sandals cards extra hiking socks a cell phone a rain coat and one luxury item 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
    79. 79. How to Pack
    80. 80. How to Pack • Compress
    81. 81. How to Pack • Compress • Eliminate unnecessary things
    82. 82. How to Pack • Compress • Eliminate unnecessary things • Avoid bulging, keep the pack stream line
    83. 83. How to Pack • Compress • Eliminate unnecessary things • Avoid bulging, keep the pack stream line • Keep things you’ll need in easy access, like your map, water, etc
    84. 84. campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    85. 85. Packing campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    86. 86. campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    87. 87. campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    88. 88. First Aid Kit campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    89. 89. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    90. 90. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    91. 91. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    92. 92. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    93. 93. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    94. 94. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs • Antiseptic ointment campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    95. 95. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs • Antiseptic ointment • Scissors campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    96. 96. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs • Antiseptic ointment • Scissors • Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    97. 97. First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs • Antiseptic ointment • Scissors • Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit • Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc) campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
    98. 98. On the Trail (blueridgeoutdoors.com/departments/great-falls-national-park-va/)
    99. 99. On the Trail (blueridgeoutdoors.com/departments/great-falls-national-park-va/)
    100. 100. Some Terms You Might Want to Know • Through Hiking/Through-Hiking: n. hike of the Trail’s entire length in one season • Section Hiking: The approach to walking the length of the Trail in segments • Trail Magic: Random acts of kindness by nonhikers for through hikers and long distance sectional hikers
    101. 101. Courtesies and Responsibilities
    102. 102. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace
    103. 103. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail
    104. 104. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail
    105. 105. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail • Picking up trash
    106. 106. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail • Picking up trash • Collecting fallen wood for fire, not chopping it down
    107. 107. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail • Picking up trash • Collecting fallen wood for fire, not chopping it down
    108. 108. Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail • Picking up trash • Collecting fallen wood for fire, not chopping it down
    109. 109. Courtesies and Responsibilities • If you’ve gotta go... • Use a shovel to make a hole at least 6 in. deep • Go at least 20-30 feet away from the trail • Make sure to take your trash with you • If your going to use leaves make sure you know what they are
    110. 110. Signs
    111. 111. Signs Trail Blazers
    112. 112. Signs Trail Blazers
    113. 113. Signs Trail Blazers
    114. 114. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white
    115. 115. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white
    116. 116. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue
    117. 117. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue
    118. 118. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue
    119. 119. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue
    120. 120. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue Warning Signs
    121. 121. Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue Warning Signs
    122. 122. Views
    123. 123. Water (purebound.com)
    124. 124. Water • Unfortunately today we cant drink right out of the steams anymore • Bacteria can cause hikers to become very sick (purebound.com)
    125. 125. Water • Unfortunately today we cant drink right out of the steams anymore • Bacteria can cause hikers to become very sick • Sterilizing water • iodine tablets • pump (purebound.com) • boiling
    126. 126. Shelters
    127. 127. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters
    128. 128. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory
    129. 129. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail
    130. 130. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail • Keep the site clean and trash free
    131. 131. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail • Keep the site clean and trash free • Towns
    132. 132. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail • Keep the site clean and trash free • Towns • Restock on food, fresh water
    133. 133. Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail • Keep the site clean and trash free • Towns • Restock on food, fresh water • Bath and wash clothes
    134. 134. Wildlife • Animals can rip into packs and tents • Raccoons, Bears, Deer, Chipmunks • Avoid them by hanging your food or putting it in a bear container
    135. 135. Wildlife Bears Moose Wild Ponies Raccoons Deer
    136. 136. Terrain • Northern Bolders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways
    137. 137. Application Component • A hiking trip of the Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania
    138. 138. Application Component
    139. 139. Class Activity
    140. 140. Class Activity
    141. 141. Works Cited
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