Leveraging Technology To Differentiate Instruction2679
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  • Hand out the KWL chart. The beginning of the presentation will be about what DI is and then we will get into how to use technology to differentiate instruction. Technology can be used to differentiate instruction in very simple ways and more intricate ways.

Leveraging Technology To Differentiate Instruction2679 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Leveraging Technology to Differentiate Instruction by Lauren Fee Instructional Technology Services of Central Ohio
  • 2. A Definition
    • “ Differentiation means tailoring instruction to meet individual needs . Whether teachers differentiate content , process , products , or the learning environment , the use of ongoing assessment and flexible grouping makes this a successful approach to instruction.”
    • - Carol Ann Tomlinson
  • 3. Simply Put
    • Response to learner needs
    • Recognition of students’ varying background knowledge/preferences
    • Instruction that appeals to students’ differences (Personal Learning Environments)
      • iGoogle
      • PageFlakes
      • ZCubes
  • 4. A lot to consider
    • Learning styles, skill levels and rates
    • Learning difficulties
    • Language proficiency
    • Background experiences and knowledge
    • Interests
    • Motivation
    • Social/emotional development
    • Various intelligences
  • 5. Teachers Can Differentiate
    • According to Students’
    Readiness Interest Learning Profile Content Process Product
  • 6. Technologies to Differentiate Content, Process & Product
    • Web searching ( Grokker - WikiMindMap )
    • Simple Searching ( Yahoo!)
    • Podcasts ( Coulee Kids - 60 Sec Science )
    • Blog ( Getting started - Edublogs)
    • Wikis ( East Side Community School)
    • Google ( Docs - Custom Search Engine )
    • WebQuest ( Matrix )
    • Video/Photo editing ( Jumpcut )
  • 7.  
  • 8. Sternberg’s Theory
  • 9. Partial List of Learning Modality Tasks/Skills http://www.usd.edu/trio/tut/ts/style.html
    • make
    • show in lab
    • transform
    • craft
    • simulate
    • produce
    • dance
    • use tools to..
    • act out
    • build
    • demonstrate
    • model
    Kinesthetic
    • pop-up
    • video
    • graph
    • model
    • cartoon
    • illustrate
    • web
    • timeline
    • chart
    • map
    • overlay
    • diagram
    Visual
    • perform
    • converse
    • argue
    • sing
    • cook/taste
    • debate
    • interview
    • question
    • discuss
    • speech
    • broadcast
    • recite
    Oral
    • phone
    • speech
    • compose
    • rhythm
    • ad/jingle
    • persuade
    • chant
    • commercial
    • podcast
    • music
    • soundscape
    • radiocast
    Auditory
  • 10. Foundations of DI Pre-assessment Flexible grouping Instruction Formative assessment Adjust Instruction Flexible grouping Summative assessment
  • 11. What to Pre-Assess
    • Readiness
    • “ A student’s entry point relative to a particular understanding or skill.”
    • Interest
    • “ Refers to a child’s affinity, curiosity, or passion for a particular topic or skill.”
    • Learning Profile
    • “ It is shaped by intelligence preferences, gender, culture, or learning style.”
    • Tomlinson The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners
  • 12. Technology and Pre-Assessment
    • KWL / Online Pre-tests ( Discovery School)
    • Journal Entry/Blog ( Edublog )
    • Graffiti Wall ( Wiki )
    • Video
    • Online Multiple Intelligence Inventories
    • Abiator’s Online Learning Styles Inventory
    • Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire
    • Exit Cards
  • 13. Technology and Summative Assessment
    • Electronic Portfolio ( Helen Barrett )
      • Process of developing
      • Examples
      • Traditional technology tools
      • Web 2.0 tools
        • Blogs/Wikis
        • Google Docs/Spreadsheet
        • Podcasting
  • 14. Instructional Strategies
    • Tiered Activities
    • Learning Contracts
    • Choice Boards
      • Menu
      • Bingo
      • RAFT’s
  • 15. Tiered Activities
    • “ Teachers use tiered activities so all students focus on essential understandings and skills but at different levels of complexity, abstractness, and open-endedness.”
            • - Tomlinson
  • 16. Tiered Activity – Writing a Persuasive Essay 4th–6th Grade Classroom Students will be able to write a five-paragraph essay that states a point of view, defends the point of view, and uses resources to support the point of view. The essay will meet the criteria on the state writing rubric. Students will be able to state a point of view and successfully defend the idea using two paragraphs that defend the point of view using main ideas and supporting details. The paragraphs will meet the criteria on the state writing rubric. Students will be able to write a five-sentence paragraph that successfully states and supports a main idea. The paragraph will meet the criteria on the state writing rubric. Assessment Students will review the graphic organizer for a persuasive essay. Students will be given explicit instruction in locating sources and quotes for their essays. As a prewriting activity, students will use the graphic organizer to organize their essay. Students will also compile a list of five sources that defend their main point. Students will receive a model of a persuasive essay and a graphic organizer that explains the construction of a persuasive essay. Students will also receive explicit instruction in writing a persuasive essay. As a prewriting activity, students will use the graphic organizer to plan their writing. Students will receive a model of a five-sentence paragraph and explicit instruction in constructing the paragraph. As a prewriting activity , students will list their topic and develop a list of at least three things that support their topic. Instruction/ Activity Students will determine a topic, state a point of view, and write an essay of at least five paragraphs that uses multiple sources to defend that point of view. Students will determine a topic, state a point of view, and write two paragraphs defending that point of view. Students will determine a topic and will write a five-sentence paragraph with a main idea, three supporting sentences, and a concluding sentence. Outcome/ Objective Advanced Intermediate Beginning
  • 17. Learning Contracts “ In essence, a learning contract is a negotiated agreement between teacher and students that gives students some freedom in acquiring skills and understanding that a teacher (students) deems important at a given time.” - Tomlinson
  • 18. Designing a Differentiated Learning Contract
    • A Learning Contract may have the following components
    • A Skills Component
      • Focus is on skills-based tasks
      • Assignments are based on pre-assessment of students’ readiness
      • Students work at their own level and pace
    • A Content component
      • Focus is on applying, extending, or enriching key content (ideas, understandings)
      • Requires sense making and production
      • Assignment is based on readiness or interest
    • A Time Line
      • Teacher sets completion date and check-in requirements
      • Students select order of work (except for required meetings and homework)
    • The Agreement
      • The teacher agrees to let students have freedom to plan their time
      • Students agree to use the time responsibly
      • Guidelines for working are spelled out
      • Consequences for ineffective use of freedom are delineated
      • Signatures of the teacher, student and parent (if appropriate) are placed on the agreement
  • 19. I will read: I will look at and listen to: I will write: I will draw: I will need: Here’s how I will share what I know: My question or topic is: I will finish by this date: To find out about my question or topic… Learning Contract #1 Name _______________________
  • 20. Learning Contract #2 To demonstrate what I have learned about ____________________, I want to _ Write a report _ Put on a demonstration _ Set up an experiment _ Develop a computer presentation _ Build a model _ Design a mural _ Write a song _ Make a movie _ Create a graphic organizer or diagram _ Other This will be a good way to demonstrate understanding of this concept because ______________________________________________________________ To do this project, I will need help with ______________________________________________________________ My Action Plan is________________________________________________ The criteria/rubric which will be used to assess my final product is _________ ______________________________________________________________ My project will be completed by this date _____________________________ Student signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__ Teacher signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__
  • 21. Choice Boards “ With choice boards, changing assignments are placed in permanent pockets. By asking a student to make a work selection from a particular row, the teacher targets work toward student need and at the same time allows student choice.” -Tomlinson
  • 22.
    • Entrée (Select One)
    • Draw a picture that shows what happens during photosynthesis.
    • Write two paragraphs about what happens during photosynthesis.
    • Create a rap that explains what happens during photosynthesis.
    Diner Menu – Photosynthesis
    • Appetizer (Everyone Shares)
    • Write the chemical equation for photosynthesis.
    • Side Dishes (Select at Least Two)
    • Define respiration, in writing.
    • Compare photosynthesis to respiration using a Venn Diagram .
    • Write a journal entry from the point of view of a green plant.
    • With a partner, create and perform a skit that shows the differences between photosynthesis and respiration.
    • Dessert (Optional)
    • Create a test to assess the teacher’s knowledge of photosynthesis.
  • 23. Writing Bingo Try for one or more BINGOs this month. Remember, you must have a real reason for the writing experience! If you mail or email your product, get me to read it first and initial your box! Be sure to use your writing goals and our class rubric to guide your work. Book Think Aloud Design for a web page Journal for a week Proposal to improve something Letter to your teacher Greeting card Instructions Poem Cartoon strip Advertisement Schedule for your work Grocery or shopping list Your choice Short story Newspaper article Interview Skit or scene Letter to a pen pal, friend, or relative Email request for information Invitation Rules for a game Directions to one place to another Letter to the editor Thank you note Recipe
  • 24. RAFT “ RAFT is an acronym for Role, Audience, Format, and Topic. In a RAFT, students take on a particular role, develop a product for a specified audience in a particular format and on a topic that gets right at the heart of what matters most in a particular segment of study.” - Tomlinson
  • 25. RAFT
    • Role : Who are you as the writer? Are you Abraham Lincoln? A warrior? A homeless person? An auto mechanic? The endangered snail darter?
    • Audience : To whom are you writing? Is your audience the American people? A friend? Your teacher? Readers of a newspaper? A local bank?
    • Format : What form will the writing take? Is it a letter? A classified ad? A speech? A poem?
    • Topic : What's the subject or the point of this piece? Is it to persuade a goddess to spare your life? To plead for a re-test? To call for stricter regulations on logging?
  • 26. Language Arts & Literature Science History Math Format based on the work of Doug Buehl cited in Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: If Not Me Then Who? Billmeyer and Martin, 1998 How to Get to Know Me Set of Directions Students in your class A word problem To Be Considered A Part of the Family Petition Whole Numbers Fractions If I Could Talk to You Now Full page Newspaper Ad Current Residents of Virginia Thomas Jefferson The Dream Revisited Speech TV audience of 2010 Martin Luther King Hitler is Dead Obituary Public Reporter Before It’s Too Late Paste Up “Ransom”Note John Q. Citizen Rain Forest To Maximize Product Life Owner’s Guide Owner Lung The Beauty of Cycles Advice Column Future Droplets Rain Drop A Few Things You Should Know Note hidden in a tree knot Tom Sawyer Huck Finn How our Language Defines Who We Are Op Ed Piece Public N.Y.Times I Wish You Really Understood Where I Belong Diary entry Middle Schoolers Semicolon Topic Format Audience Role
  • 27. Consumer Education Class RAFT In this RAFT, all students will have a Topic that focus on food safety practices. The Formats are meant to appeal to different learning styles. Watch out! I’m going to get you! Urgent Email Picnickers Mayonnaise in egg salad What to do with items from the refrigerator and freezer that have come to room temperature Consumer Alert messages for broadcast on TV Homeowners who have lost power for 3+ days due to hurricane or ice storm Power Company Consumer Relations Dept. Dangers of thawing meat out on a counter Role play or simulation Ground beef Bacteria Proper care of knives and cutting boards Illustrated Poster or Flow Diagram Restaurant workers National Restaurant Organization The importance of cleanliness and washing hands Jingle, rap, or chant Saturday morning viewers Cartoon characters Why foods like me (poultry) require special handling and care of utensils Dramatic speech Chefs in training Raw chicken pieces Topic Format Audience Role
  • 28. 3-2-1 Exit Card
    • 3 things you learned
    • 2 ways you might start or continue in your own classroom.
    • 1 question you still have
  • 29. Additional Resources
    • Different Strokes for Little Folks
    • Differentiated Instruction
    • Differentiating the Learning Environment
    • What is Differentiated Instruction?
    • Technology and Multiple Intelligence
    • Lakeland Schools: Using Technology to Differentiate Instruction
    • Enhance Learning with Technology
  • 30. Thanks so much
    • Send me your 3-2-1’s!
    • [email_address]
    • www.itscoteam.org/~lauren
    • ITSCO
    • Instructional Technology of Central Ohio, Inc.
    • www.itsco.org
  • 31. References:
    • Some materials adapted from a presentation by Melissa Storm, PhD, The Access Center and Lori Centerbar, Med, South Burlington Public Schools, VT. Other materials are from an ASCD Onsite Professional Development Class offered by Sandra Page ( www.ascd.org ).
    • Thanks to my colleagues Peggy Whyte and Alexa Stazenski for sharing their work.