Courses not offered in verona

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Courses not offered in verona

  1. 1. COURSES CURRENTLY NOT OFFERED IN VERONAAVERAGE STUDENT ENROLLED or EXAMINED IN OTHER “I” GROUPSOBJECTIVE/GOALS OF COURSEArt: Studio Art DrawingArt: Studio Art-2D DesignArt: Studio Art-3D Design148 took exam2Encourage students to become independent thinkers who will contribute inventively and critically to their culture through the making of art. Computer Science AB13Emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. Economics: MacroeconomicsEconomics: Microeconomics3758* LivingstonDesigned to give you a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops your familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics Environmental Science47Provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Gov & Politics Comparative 34The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. History of Art29In the course, students examine major forms of artistic expression from the ancient world to the present and from a variety of cultures. They learn to look and analyze works of art within their historical context, and to articulate what they see or experience in a meaningful way Human Geography17*Caldwell- W. CaldwellIntroduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences Latin: Vergil7*W. EssexStudents are expected to be able to translate accurately from Latin into English the poetry they are reading and to demonstrate a grasp of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Italian15The course seeks to develop language skills that are useful in and of themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than being limited to any specific body of subject matter. Psychology4 took examintroduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Spanish Literature7 * S. Orange-MaplewoodSpanish Literature course is comparable to a third-year college introduction to Hispanic literature course. It is based on a required reading list. The works on the list are of literary significance and represent various historical periods, literary movements, genres, geographic areas, and population groups within the Spanish-speaking world. The objective of the course is to help you interpret and analyze literature in Spanish.Statistics33The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themesWorld History13Develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills.Physics B20provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability using algebra and trigonometry, but rarely calculusPhysics C - Elec & Magnet12This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. The sequence is more intensive and analytic than that in the B course. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus. The subject matter of the C course is principally mechanics and electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas. Physics C - Mechanics12<br />*represent total students NOT averages <br />

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