Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Learning as we teach: e-books, an overview
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Learning as we teach: e-books, an overview

1,339
views

Published on

I recently had the pleasure of presenting at a Pearson conference on e-books about the opportunities and challenges this emergent technology represents. …

I recently had the pleasure of presenting at a Pearson conference on e-books about the opportunities and challenges this emergent technology represents.

This presentation covers seven key areas.
1. A little context
2. Caution - emergent technology
3. What are e-books anyway?
4. pro’s & con’s (according to the evidence)
5. e-book features
6. Teaching and learning (new pedagogies)
7. What can you do?
8. What does the future hold for e-books?

Please share your views using the comments function or by getting in touch.

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,339
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Learning as we teach e-books, an overview 21st November 2013 Pearson e-books conference Louis Coiffait (@louismmcoiffait) The Pearson Think Tank and OCEA thepearsonthinktank.com
  • 2. e-books agenda 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 2 A little context Caution - emergent technology What are e-books anyway? pro’s & con’s (according to the evidence) e-book features Teaching and learning (new pedagogies) What can you do? What does the future hold for e-books? Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 3. Introductions Independent evidence and ideas from Pearson   Working with Sir Michael Barber’s team on more global projects e.g. Michael Fullan paper out in Jan 14 on digital pedagogies.  Ongoing policy intelligence, analysis and comment e.g. Policy Watch.  Participate in key education debates, provide a platform for ideas.  3 Programme of research and thought-leadership e.g.  The Academies Commission (Jan 13), Careers advice (Sep 13)  Blue Skies, on the future of higher education (on-going)  Tuition fees (May 13) and admissions (both Sep 13) All of our content and activities are free. Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 4. A little context 4 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 1
  • 5. A little context e-books around the world (not just electronic HE textbooks) e-books currently still a relatively small proportion of total book sales: • 2% OECD average • 4% United Kingdom • 9% United States Older readers more likely to own e-readers than younger readers. But we’re seeing a rapid transformation of the book, from physical, paper object to electronic ‘e-book’. Global e-book industry to triple from c.$1bn in 2010 to c.$3bn in 2015. 2011 Amazon announces e-book sales overtake sales of print books. Pearson transforming ourselves quickly to deliver e-books e.g. 17% of Penguin’s 2012 revenue now in eBooks, up from 12% in 2011. 5 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 6. Caution - emergent technology 6 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 2
  • 7. Caution - emergent technology Re-writing the rules Disruptive to existing structures, practices and business models. You’re not alone, governments and businesses still responding . Taxes - differing VAT rates between physical books and e-books; • UK printed book 0%, e-book 20% • Germany printed book 7%, 19% • France 5.5%, 7% Pricing laws prohibit discounting of e-books. Consumer rights; privacy, copyright, DRM, piracy, lending, libraries. Limitations on how users can read / share their purchased content. Not always clear what happens to personal usage data. Platforms with consumer lock-in, rapid evolution and sometimes death e.g. nobody wants to buy in to the Betamax or HD DVD of e-books. 7 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 8. What are e-books anyway? 8 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 3
  • 9. What are e-books anyway? Some definitions and terminology e-book; electronic book, eBook, ebook, etextbook, ePub, eReader, electronic textbooks, digital texts, e-texts, hypertext books File formats; EPUB, PDF, DOC, TXT, HTML, RTF, JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP, MP3, plain text, MOBI, AZW Software; Adobe PDF, XML, SGML, HTML, Kortext, VitalSource, FlashPaper, CaféScribe, CourseSmart, Pearson eText Hardware; E-Reader, Palm Reader, Sony Reader, Kindle, iPhone, iPad, Mac, Kobo, Android, Nook, BeBook, BlackBerry, Windows, Windows Phone 7, tablet, smart-phone, computer, MP3 player 9 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 10. e-book pro’s and con’s (according to the evidence) 10 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 4
  • 11. e-book pro’s and con’s (according to the evidence) Key considerations 1/2 Cost: usually cheaper for learners/institutions Customisation allows only targeted content and less ‘waste’. Distribution is fast, cheap and flexible, source content varies. Complicated slightly by hardware investment. Fairness questions; • Overall lower cost to students • But seems that natural uptake levels of about 50% • Does this give those who can pay an advantage? • Should those who can’t pay be helped? Green; far less paper/printing/ink/logistics, but hardware may have rare/toxic/non-biodegradable substances to produce, some find jury still out on ‘whole e-reader ecological lifecycle’, read 100 e-books on each device to be ‘green’? 11 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 12. e-book pro’s and con’s (according to the evidence) Key considerations 2/2 Some staff and students still have preferences for hard copies; • Comfortable, familiar, permanent, physical possessions • Allow where possible, provide options, support through change IT issues; new technology, technical issues can arise, compatibility. Outsource induction/training/support e.g. videos, exercises, suppliers. Hardware: Provide / allow own devices / mix of both – who pays? • Dartford College iPad for all pilot http://pear.sn/qYlzz. • Japanese region declared all school students must pay for own tablet. • Some UK courses and HEIs provide hardware ‘free’ to students. • Pearson UK case studies. Implement carefully, significant change, requires thoughtful planning, training, CPD, support and communications. Increasingly used as a core text resource, may require compromises. 12 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 13. e-book features 13 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 5
  • 14. e-book features So why the fuss? 1/2 Spectrum of sophistication (list of benefits when implemented well). Initially just straight ‘digital copies’, PDFs or scans of hard copies. Convenient, light and portable. Whenever / wherever, always with the user. No wear and tear, loss or damage, though hardware costs/risks. All in one place (textbook, VLE, worksheets, assessments, dictionaries). Device-specific limitations e.g. e-readers don’t allow multi-tasking. Accessibility and zoom options. Navigation and (hopefully smart) search. Foreign language support. Links e.g. to real-world examples, further reading, multimedia content. 14 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 15. e-book features So why the fuss? 2/2 Make and share highlights/notes/annotations – a good initial step, needs to align to existing motivations/activities, requires sufficient time, support and practice. Sometimes still limited functionality. Communication, sharing and collaboration tools, existing social networks e.g. FaceBook, LinkedIn etc as well as VLE. Audio and video. Assessment. Content & Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) for language teaching. Games. View or edit raw data behind charts – move to ‘reproducible research’. Fully interactive/dynamic, personalised to learning styles/paces. 15 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 16. Teaching and learning (new pedagogies) 16 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 6
  • 17. Teaching and learning (new pedagogies) What does it mean for your practice? Some data on learning outcomes, not conclusive yet, hard to isolate. Seems to increase learner acceptance/use/engagement with resources. Requires appropriate introduction to manage the change. Must also consider expectations (between generations, personal/academic lives, potential/reality of new technologies). Stop reliance on hand-outs, aid independent study/intrinsic motivation. integrate textbook content into classroom teaching/activities on VLE. Guide learners around content, sign-posting, e.g. sharing notes. Concept Grid method. Relationship to e-learning, m-learning, blended learning, online learning, metasystems learning theory. 17 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 18. What can you do? 18 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 7
  • 19. What can you do? Practical next steps Experiment, evaluate, research, share lessons learned. Limited research and data available on e-books, mostly American. Hard to isolate the impact of eBooks, they’re a ‘gateway technology’, with the content (rather than the hardware) leading users to other systems… 19 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 20. What does the future hold for e-books? 20 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013 8
  • 21. What does the future hold for e-books? Three suggestions… Seamless integration of e-books/apps/online/tests, all device-neutral. More practical; • Real-world and real-time • high-resolution-screens, voice recorder, camera, timer, GPS position locator, accelerometer, compass, tilt sensor (wearable sensors soon) • Simulations. The power to unlock the potential of open education data This is the holy grail for the future of e-books. Leads to truly adaptive, personalised learning. Built on open data standards and APIs. With more data-literate educators, learners and populations… 21 Learning as we teach; e-books, an overview l 21/11/2013
  • 22. Further reading list on eBooks A starter for ten EdSurge http://pear.sn/qYmog HASTAC http://pear.sn/qYmv6 NESTA/Pearson http://pear.sn/qYCOc New Media Consortium http://pear.sn/qYmDU OECD http://pear.sn/qYvnB Open University http://pear.sn/qYmVg European Journal of Law & Technology http://pear.sn/qYn5F Pearson USA http://pear.sn/qYnUK Victoria Business School http://pear.sn/qYnum Our Jan 2014 ‘Rich Seam’ publication with Michael Fullan
  • 23. Thank you, any questions please?