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  • http://www.archive.org/details/EinarRose-01-07german http://www.archive.org/details/HeinzEgon-EineNachtInMonteCarlo1931
  • "The boxing Kangaroo", "The Wrestler" and "The Serpentine Dance". They were all shot earlier in the garden of the same restaurant. The ballroom of the "Felschlößchen" restaurant was later converted into the first permanent cinema in Germany and served the audience under the name "Tivoli"
  • Garbo – I want to be alone. OR I want to be let alone.
  • The more the censorship, the bigger the audience. Potemkin premiered in Berlin in the spring of 1926 and the number of copies did not meet the demand.
  • Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks came to Berlin to promote the film.
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Oversimplification of what is visually present
  • Moments of joy nestled in misery.
  • Sets a context A technique used to place the film in the “present” To convince the audience that it is an accurate representation of the social conditions in Berlin
  • Urban montage: very 3-5 seconds. Increases slightly in tempo
  • Related - Cubism's attempt at synthesizing multiple perspectives into one painting
  • "The Man with a Movie Camera" that Vertov was fighting "for a decisive cleaning up of film-language, for its complete separation from the language of theater and literature.”
  • The unemployed going nowhere.
  • Franz is unemployed for 6 months. Father “no right to dole” mother – “if you just tried hard enough”
  • Visit this photo essay
  • Franz’ suicide is juxtaposed against the images of the bicycle (job seeking) and his mother carrying water on the steps.
  • Ask for an epitaph here…less threatening than the larger idea of “poem”
  • The voyeursitic attitude of the neighbors. Everyone/Anyone’s child.
  • THE NEIGHBORS: Aside from its comic effect, a tragic effect also takes place: it shows the complete absence of solidarity and any critical reflection among the working class.
  • Forced move to camp after eviction.
  • Melodrama? ANNI AND FRITZ
  • “MOTIVATES AUDIENCES TO QESTION THE POPULAR IMAGE OF THE CULTURE INDUSTRY AS AN APOLITICAL INSTITUTION OF ENTERTAINMENT.” P. 221
  • Mom makes the grocery list…worries about survival.
  • .
  • nature – “village” – “The best years of a young man” the “open” space of nature leaves room for intellectual thought.
  • Duchamp’s” Anemic Cinema” of 1926
  • Comradeship – baby goes away.(was abortion edited?)? communist sporting organisation where she helps to construct other kinds ofcollective ties. These ties transcend petit-bourgeois mentality on the one hand, and the patriarchal family (and its disintegration), on the other. - the famous Benjaminian prescription: the aesthetization of politics (Nazism) is countered by the politicisation of aesthetics. Brecht politicises a sports festival that will later be reappropriated by Nazism and its advocates.
  • Critique of world capitalism. a communist comrade intervenes. He asks the nationalist, who precisely embodies the ‘we’ that he is always referring to, ‘Who will profit from it? Us?’’ The comrade explains that it is certainly not him, or the old lady sitting over there or the gentleman sleeping in the other part of the train. Nobody among ‘us’ will make any profit from colonies. He does not provide ananswer to the question of who will receive the profit,
  • ‘Who will change the world?’ - ‘Those who don’t like it.’
  • Distantiation effect
  • Opinions
  • Take a look at http://www.archive.org/ for Weimar period music.

Transcript

  • 1. UN- KUHLE WUMPE (TO WHOM DOES THE WORLD BELONG?) SEMI NAR Trivia Production Context LORI KENT
  • 2. Written and partially directed by BERTOLD BRECHT Direction: Slatan Dudow. Cinematography: Gunther Krampf Music: Hanns Eisler c. 1932 UN-SEMINAR PRESENTATION:
  • 3. Everyone needs help from everyone. - Bertolt Brecht http://wiu.edu/users/brecht10//brecht_english/brecht_chronology.html
  • 4. It is rumored that Brecht had ____ mistresses simultaneously throughout his adult life. A. One B. Two C. Three
  • 5. It is rumored that Brecht had ____ mistresses simultaneously throughout his adult life. A. One B. Two C. Three
  • 6.
    • Cinema was a short lived novelty for the German
    • upper classes beginning in 1895…they soon lost interest. Next, cinema producers targeted the working classes.
    • The first public performance using the Bioscop was organized in the restaurant Feldschlößchen in Berlin-Pankow, Berliner Straße 27…it was later renamed the Tivoli.
  • 7. A LARGER CONTEXT: THE ACADEMY AWARDS
  • 8. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •   CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 9. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 10. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 11. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •   THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 12. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •   FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 13. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •   LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 14. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 15. NOTES ABOUT PRODUCTION •  THE CREATORS OF THE FILM WERE ACCOMPLISHED IN THEIR FIELDS •  CENSORED/EDITED TWICE BEFORE RELEASE •  OVER A YEAR IN THE MAKING (DUE TO INTERRUPTIONS) •  60% OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN “EVERYDAY SETTINGS” •  THE FIRST SOUND FEATURE BY THE LEFT. •  FEATURED LEFTIST THEATER AND AGIPROP GROUPS SUCH AS GRUPPE JUNGER SCHAUSPIELER AND DAS ROTE SPRACHROHR •  LOW BUDGET AND FINANCIALLY TROUBLED • PROMETHEUS FOLDED THEN PRASENS FILM COMPANY COMPLETED THE PRODUCTION
  • 16. Prometheus Film-Verlieh und Vertriebs-GmbH was solvent in 1925 because they served as the distributors of: a. Cabinet of Dr. Cagliari b. Battleship Potemkin c. Gold Rush
  • 17. Prometheus Film-Verlieh und Vertriebs-GmbH became financially successful in 1926 because they served as the distributors of: a. Cabinet of Dr. Cagliari b. Battleship Potemkin c. Gold Rush
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • Verfremdungseffekt , or distantiation effect, that was primarily used in Brecht’s Epic theatre. This effect aimed to break the link between the spectator and her identification with the hero of the play, and
    • to shock her out of her uncritical capture by the entertainment.
    • With the intervention of distantiation , spectators could participate in the construction of meaning and possibly
    • even become able to distinguish between ‘ideological’ reality and ‘actual’ reality – the
    • social relations that shape their lives.
    Kirn, Gal (2007) ‘Kuhle Wampe: Politics of Montage, De-montage of Politics?’, Film-Philosophy, vol. 11, no. 1, p.5
  • 20. http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-best-german-beer-drinking/id385112689
  • 21. Context of Berlin – Urban, Industrialized, Crowded, Troubled
  • 22. Context of Berlin – Urban, Industrialized, Crowded, Troubled Introduction to Family
  • 23. Context of Berlin – Urban, Industrialized, Crowded, Troubled Introduction to Family Glimpse of “Community”
  • 24. Context of Berlin – Urban, Industrialized, Crowded, Troubled Introduction to Family Glimpse of “Community” 161 seconds of cultivated and semi-cultivated nature
  • 25. Context of Berlin – Urban, Industrialized, Crowded, Troubled Introduction to Family Glimpse of “Community” 161 seconds of cultivated and semi-cultivated nature Camp
  • 26. Engagement Party
  • 27. Engagement Party Comradeship through Sport
  • 28. Engagement Party Comradeship through Sport Political Theater
  • 29. Engagement Party Comradeship through Sport Coffee Conversation: Critique of Global Capitalism Political Theater
  • 30. Mother smiles once. What is the context?
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34. “ THE MOOD SET WAS PASSIVE AND DEPRESSING…DETERIORATED HOUSING.” THE MONTAGE COMBINED WITH AGITATIVE MUSIC WAS USED TO “ STIMULATE OPPOSITION MORE THAN SYMPATHETIC SENTIMENTALITY.” Murray, B (1990). Film and the German Left in the Weimar Republic: From Caligari to Kuhle Wumpe. Ausitn: University of Texas Press. p 221
  • 35.
    • I. METRIC MONTAGE
    • The fundamental criterion for this construction is the abso lute lengths of the pieces. The pieces are joined together according to their lengths, in a formula-scheme corresponding to a measure of music. Realization is in the repetition of these "measures.”
    • 2. RHYTHMIC MONTAGE
    • Here, in determining the lengths of the pieces, the content within the frame is a factor possessing equal rights to consideration. Abstract determination of the piece-lengths gives way to a flexible relationship of the actual lengths.
    • 3. TONAL MONTAGE
    • In tonal montage, movement is perceived in a wider sense. The concept of movement embraces all affects of the montage piece. Here montage is based on the characteristic emotional sound of the piece-of its dominant. The general tone of the piece.
    • 4. OVERTONAL MONTAGE
    • This characteristic steps up the impression from a melodically emotional coloring to a directly physiological perception.
    • 5. INTELLECTUAL MONTAGE
    • Intellectual montage is montage not of generally physiological overtonal sounds, but of sounds and overtones of an intellectual sort: i.e., conflict-juxtaposition of accompanying intellectual affects.
    • See: Eisenstein, S. (1938) “Word and Image”
  • 36.
      • VERTOV ( Дзи́га Ве́ртов)
      • … .WAS EXTREMELY RADICAL IN HIS
      • MONTAGE AND HIS TECHNIQUE WAS NOT
      • TRANSPARENT. HE TRIED TO PLAY WITH
      • NORMATIVE IDENTIFICATION
      • (ANTINARRATIVE, ANTI-DIALOGUE – THE SO-
      • CALLED ‘CINEMA-EYE’) . ON THE OTHER
      • HAND, EISENSTEIN WAS MUCH MORE
      • PEDAGOGICAL AND HE FORMULATED A
      • VERSION OF MONTAGE AS ‘CINEMA-FIST’.
    See: Deleuze, G. (1986) Cinema I: The Movement-Image. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. If this scene were your inspiration for a country and western song, what would you name it?
  • 40. Eric O’Donnell Cowboys: East Germany, Rebels of the Vogtland http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ui1W7TQ15vo&feature=related
  • 41. Franz’ scream is his only utterance. “This scream is as non-human as the sounds made by [Kafka’s] insect Samsa. Franz’s final scream is contrasted with the steps of his mother. There is no silence after death. The steps persistently echo along the images of their apartment, until the camera finally fixes on the image of the bicycle.” For a detailed description of the distinction between voice versus sound see Dolar, M. (2006) A Voice and Nothing More. London: MIT Press.
  • 42. Poem for Franz . http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-216676152094085175
  • 43.  
  • 44. Weegee (1941) First Murder
  • 45. CAMP
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50.  
  • 51. THE CREATIVE STRATEGY OF BRECHT: The spectator was no longer in any way allowed to submit to an experience uncritically (and without practical consequences) by means of simple empathy with the characters in a play. The production took the subject matter and the incidents shown and put them through a process of alienation: the alienation that is necessary to all understanding. When something seems 'the most obvious thing in the world' it means that any attempt to understand the world has been given up. Bertold Brecht, interview with Luth Otto, in Brecht on Theatre: the Development of an Aesthetic , ed. and tr. by John Willett, Hill and Wang, New York, 1964, p. 70-71
  • 52. BRECHT’S CRITIQUE OF “REALISTIC” THEATER: The bourgeois theatre's performances always aim at smoothing over contradictions, at creating false harmony, at idealization. Conditions are reported as if they could not be otherwise; characters as individuals, incapable by definition of being divided, cast in one block, manifesting themselves in the most various situations, likewise for that matter existing without any situation at all. If there is any development it is always steady, never by jerks; the developments always take place within a definite framework which cannot be broken through. None of this is like reality, so a realistic theatre must give it up .   . Bertold Brecht, "Appendices to the Short Organum," in Brecht on Theatre: the Development of an Aesthetic , ed. and tr. by John Willett, Hill and Wang, New York, 1964, p. 271, para. 46.
  • 53. THE BEST YEARS OF HIS LIFE…
  • 54.  
  • 55.  
  • 56.  
  • 57.  
  • 58.  
  • 59.  
  • 60. WHO IS THE US?
  • 61. THE CREATIVE STRATEGY OF BRECHT: Verfremdungseffekt Bertold Brecht, interview with Luth Otto, in Brecht on Theatre: the Development of an Aesthetic , ed. and tr. by John Willett, Hill and Wang, New York, 1964, p. 70-71
  • 62. NOTES ABOUT RECEPTION: AN ESTMIATED 14,000 PEOPLE ATTENDED PERFORMANCES AT THE ATRIUM THE FIRST WEEK. IT PLAYED AT 17 OTHER BERLIN THEATERS FOR ANOTHER WEEK. OVERALL, THE FILM FAILED TO CAPTURE THE PUBLIC’S INTEREST. THE PRODUCERS FELT THE FILM WAS A SUCCESS, IN PART, BECAUSE OF THE NUMBERS OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE CREATION OF THE FILM–ABOUT 4000+. Murray, B (1990). Film and the German Left in the Weimar Republic: From Caligari to Kuhle Wumpe. Ausitn: University of Texas Press
  • 63.  
  • 64. MUSIC Varshaviana • History of the Soviet Union in Ballad and Song Klarinettenmucki •  Polka Express Kaddisch • Paul O’ Montis & Ralph Erwin Gelbe Rose •  Medium Terzett Een Schlager Gaat op Stap • Heinje Davids Eine Nacht in Monte Carlo • (1931) • Heinz Egon Karlsbader Sprudelfox •  (1931) • Hermann Leopoldi