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Intro Lecture AmArtASP 10/21 pps

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The first lecture. Please take a look at the links.

The first lecture. Please take a look at the links.

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  • Welcome slide.
  • Questions, will speak clearly, raise questions but might not have answers. Multiple viewpoints, not my opinion, my composition of American ideas. Multimedia experience
  • Write ten words you associate about America.
  • JOHN BERGER (1972) - the people who control the images in a culture, control the culture.
  • .From confiscated airport stuff –FLAG as one ICON
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  • .REPLACE Image
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  • .80 million dollar auction value http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/03/arts/design/03voge.html
  • Meander – walk crookedly
  • Mythmaking – a country that invented itself on ideals. Enlightenment
  • UNDERSTAND TO PRESENT WITH A SENSE OF THE PAST We begin out exploration of American contemporary art, with the foundation of the past. Hudson River school is not what is seems.
  • Lowell, Massachusetts textile mill (1840). The reality of a lost paradise. We will be taking on Myths and Stereotypes
  • We begin out exploration of American contemporary art, with the foundation of the past. Hudson River school is not what is seems. 140 years – Why study the past?
  • Lake Tahoe
  • Bierdstat studied painting with the members of the Düsseldorf School in Düsseldorf, Germany from 1853 to 1857. Artists bring their experiences to forming a new country
  • Mythmaking and stereotypes help to form a larger culture. Write down ten stereotypes about Americans.
  • The mythmaking continues.
  • One Billion dollars debuts on 30, 000 screen worldwide - Randy Phillips, the CEO of the star's concert promoter AEG Live, puts it bluntly in an exclusive interview with Live, 'It didn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that we were sitting on a goldmine (130 hours of raw footage). Not only in financial terms but also in terms of what this footage shows.”
  • Americans USING ART TO DEFINE ITSELF social policies Riis took the image below in a crowded tenement room where single males paid Five Cents a Spot for a night’s lodging. Riis entered this space with the help of the landlord, who received assurances that he would not be prosecuted for running an illegal-lodging house. Riis also needed the cooperation of the sleeping subjects, who had to appear to be awakened by his flash. In order to create that appearance, Riis had to have them pose with their faces toward the camera and then hold still while he ignited his flash powder and made the exposure.
  • .Art and Values
  • High art and low art.
  • NOT JUST FINE ARTS-
  • Visual arts – or “high arts” Propaganda?
  • Art forms to show the diversity of experience
  • There is an interesting discussion that runs through American art – what is an original American art form What is the relationship between nature and culture or technology?
  • Visual arts – or “high arts” is hard to separate to distinguish from other cultural forms. What are some of the meanings behind quilts – memory, the power of objects What an objects means – to the maker and to culture???
  • Visual arts – or “high arts” is hard to separate to distinguish from other cultural forms. What an object means – to the maker and to culture???
  • New Technologies enable new forms of art.
  • Helping us see things in new ways.
  • Visual arts – or “high arts” is hard to separate ro distinguish from other cultural forms. What an objects means – to the maker and to culture???
  • Visual arts might reference or critique popular culture…
  • Mythmaking – a country that invented itself on ideals.
  • Jackson Pollock 140 million at Auction
  • Pollock’s teacher. Best known American muralist in the 1930s-40s He is noted for his dramatization of American themes. His style is graphic, strong in color, repetitious and insistent in the use of rhythmic line.
  • We will later talk about Abstract Expressionism and the cultural conditions surrounding the movement, what they reacted to.
  • What does this 1918 photo say about America at the time?
  • 2.5 million poles 1892 – 1920s Closed 1954
  • 2.5 million poles 1892 – 1920s Closed 1954
  • he art of Mierle Laderman Ukeles is about the everyday routines of life. In 1969, after the birth of her first child, Ukeles wrote a Manifesto for Maintenance Art that questioned binary systems of opposition that articulate differences between art/life, nature/culture, and public/private. The manifesto proposed undoing boundaries that separate the maintenance of everyday life from the role of an artist in society. Ukeles was interested in how the concept of transference could be used by artists to empower people to act as agents of change to stimulate positive community involvement toward ecological sustainability.
  • In what ways are creativity encouraged in America
  • Walter Elias "Walt" Disney (December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966) Disney is particularly noted for being a film producer and a popular showman, as well as an innovator in animation and theme park design. He and his staff created a number of the world's most famous fictional characters including Mickey Mouse. He received fifty-nine Academy Award nominations and won twenty-six Oscars, including a record four in one year, [2] giving him more awards and nominations than any other individual. He also won seven Emmy Awards. He is the namesake for Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resort theme parks in the United States, Japan, France, and China.
  • In March 1992, performance artist and MacArthur Fellow, Guillermo Gómez-Peña and writer/artist Coco Fusco locked themselves in a cage. Presenting themselves as aboriginal inhabitants of an island off the gulf of Mexico that was overlooked by Columbus, their spectacle provided a thorn in the side of postcolonial angst. Enacting rituals of “authentic” daily life such as writing on a laptop computer, watching TV, making voodoo dolls, and pacing the cage garbed in Converse high-tops, raffia skirts, plastic beads, and a wrestler’s mask, the two “Amerindians” rendered a hybrid pseudo primitivism that struck a nerve. Interested members of the audience could pay for dances, stories, and Polaroids. Guilt, molestation, confusion, and letters to the humane society were among audience responses. Nearly half the visitors that saw the cage in Irvine, London, Madrid, Minneapolis, and the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. believed that the two were real captives, true natives somehow tainted by the detritus of technology and popular culture.
  • In March 1992, performance artist and MacArthur Fellow, Guillermo Gómez-Peña and writer/artist Coco Fusco locked themselves in a cage. Presenting themselves as aboriginal inhabitants of an island off the gulf of Mexico that was overlooked by Columbus, their spectacle provided a thorn in the side of postcolonial angst. Enacting rituals of “authentic” daily life such as writing on a laptop computer, watching TV, making voodoo dolls, and pacing the cage garbed in Converse high-tops, raffia skirts, plastic beads, and a wrestler’s mask, the two “Amerindians” rendered a hybrid pseudo primitivism that struck a nerve. Interested members of the audience could pay for dances, stories, and Polaroids. Guilt, molestation, confusion, and letters to the humane society were among audience responses. Nearly half the visitors that saw the cage in Irvine, London, Madrid, Minneapolis, and the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. believed that the two were real captives, true natives somehow tainted by the detritus of technology and popular culture.
  • Held together by friction and gravity. Poured into a block 3.5 feet. Meter x meter
  • I hope that you will apply what you learn to your own pursuits
  • The artist's latest project, called 1:1, is the consequence of a reflection on the post-war architectural concepts analysed from the angle of the local, Eastern European, surprisingly vital mutation of the International Movement. During the People's Poland era, progress was often restricted to impulsive, rash (and often absurdity-producing) modernisation. The requirement of "modernity" in post-war Poland was a top-down imposed decision, controlled through a series of orders.
  • CONTEMPORARY ART AS UNDERSTOOD THROUGH THEMES, STORIES
  • Transcript

    • 1. Introduction to: Introduction to American Art Dr. Lori Kent, Visiting Fulbright Lecturer 2009-2010
    • 2. LORI KENT was born in New Orleans She has a degree in • INTERIOR DESIGN • CRITICAL & CREATIVE THINKING and •  THE COLLEGE TEACHING OF ART , Ed D Columbia University NYC She has worked in • MUSEUMS, SCHOOLS, and UNIVERSITIES She is a professor of • VISUAL STUDIES and also Works as a • ARTS WRITER, ARTIST, and ARTS RESEARCHER in NYC And Pennsylvania
    • 3. What is America?
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
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    • 18.  
    • 19.  
    • 20.  
    • 21.  
    • 22. What is American Art?
    • 23. Michele Pred (2004) Airport Confiscated Knifes
    • 24. credit to SaneSMITH & PINK & graffiti.org
    • 25. David Hammons
    • 26. Samantha Pearsons
    • 27. Myein (1999) Ann Hamilton
    • 28. Colbert by Lockwood
    • 29. Faith Ringgold (1967) The Flag is Bleeding
    • 30. Anton Kandinsky (2005)
    • 31. Georgia O’Keefe
    • 32. New American Flag (2007) Thomas Bell
    • 33. Flag (1954-55) Jasper Johns
    • 34. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview late 1800s–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 35. American Mythmaking?
    • 36. Thomas Cole (1836) The Oxbow (The Connecticut River near Northampton) Hudson River School – mid 19 th century
    • 37. Lowell, Massachusetts textile mill (1840).
    • 38. Albert Bierstadt (1868) Lake Tahoe Hudson River School – mid 19 th century
    • 39.  
    • 40.  
    • 41. Fredrick Remington
    • 42. Jeff Koons (1988) Michael Jackson and Bubbles
    • 43.  
    • 44. Jacob Riis (1889) 5 Cents a Night Lodging, Bayard Street
    • 45. New York Stock Exchange
    • 46. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview 1880–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 47. America’s Diversity Art Forms Diversity of Expression
    • 48. Norman Rockwell (1946) Freedom from Want Painting
    • 49. Dorothea Lange (1933) White Angel Breadline, San Francisco Photography
    • 50. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CVKU3ErrGM Architecture
    • 51. Gees Bend Quilt (mid 20c) Craft
    • 52. Mose Tolliver Folk or Outsider Art
    • 53. Martha Rossler (1975) Semiotics of the Kitchen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zSA9Rm2PZA Performance/ Video
    • 54. Mike Kelley (1987) “ More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid" and "The Wages of Sin” Installation
    • 55. Cindy Sherman Hybrid Form
    • 56. Cindy Sherman Lucille Ball
    • 57. Scene from The Little Colonel (1935) Bill Bojangles Robinson and Shirley Temple http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjCFYpWDmfM Cinema
    • 58. Genesis (2009) R. Crumb Comics
    • 59. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview 1880–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 60. Background or Context Social, political, historical
    • 61. Easy Rider (1969) Dennis Hopper, Director http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in5uA5YXHIg Film
    • 62.  
    • 63.  
    • 64. Jackson Pollock (1950) Autumn Rhythm
    • 65. Thomas Hart Benton
    • 66.  
    • 67.  
    • 68.  
    • 69. Lee Krasner (1960) Gothic Landscape
    • 70. Paul Strand (1918) Wall Street
    • 71. Ellis Island
    • 72. Downtown New York (1900)
    • 73. Meirle Laderman Ukeles
    • 74.  
    • 75.  
    • 76. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview 1880–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 77. Creativity Encouraged? Risk-taking, Capital, Pluralism
    • 78. Sarah Sze Installation at the Asia Society
    • 79. Sarah Sze (detail)
    • 80. Andy Warhol
    • 81. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REbZO82tkgw&feature=related Walt Disney (1928) Steamboat Willy
    • 82. Frank Gehry Architect http://tu.tv/videos/simpson-gehry-sin-sub
    • 83. Vik Muniz (2000) Clouds
    • 84. Tom Friedman (2000) Eraser Shavings
    • 85. Tom Friedman (2000) Eraser Shavings
    • 86. Janine Antoni (1992) Gnaw
    • 87. Clint Eastwood as Dirty Harry (1971)
    • 88. Coco Fusco And Guillermo Gómez-Peña The Year of the White Bear (1992)
    • 89. Tara Donovan (2003) The Year of the White Bear (1992)
    • 90. Tara Donovan (2003) Pins The Year of the White Bear (1992)
    • 91. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview 1880–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 92. Artur Żmijewski (2006) Dorota
    • 93. Monica Sosnowska (2007) At the Venice Biennale
    • 94.  
    • 95. Introduction to American Art Goals: •  Overview 1880–Present • Discuss multiple forms of art •  Make connections to art and overall cultural contexts •   Discuss the creative strategies of American artists •  Look at transferability to your art production •  Offer resources for further research
    • 96. http://jacksonpollock.org/
    • 97. http://artcat.com
    • 98. http://www.collegeart.org/guidelines/
    • 99. Foundations: Histories, Personalities, and Methodologies * Schedule is subject to change 2 Lecture One: The Subject of American Art, An Overview Oct 21   Lecture Two: The “Gilded” Age Oct 28   Lecture Three: The New Century and its Promises Nov 4   Lecture Four: Depression Art Nov 11   Lecture Five: no lecture this week (At Venice Biennale) Nov 18  
    • 100. Foundations: Histories, Personalities, and Methodologies 2 Lecture Six: The War and Post-War Boom Nov 25   Lecture Seven: Abstract Expressionism and Competing Styles Dec 2   Lecture Eight: The Explosions of the 1960s Dec 9   Lecture Nine: Minimalism, Feminism, and other New Voices Dec 16   Lecture Ten: New York in the 1980s January  
    • 101. PART 2 Contemporary Practices 3 * Schedule is subject to change Lecture One: The 21c Academy Feb 17   Lecture Two: Seeing Contemporary Art Feb 24   Lecture Three: The Business of Art Mar 3   Lecture Four: New Media Art and a Possible Future Mar 10   Lecture Five: Popular Culture and the Division of High and Low March 17   Lecture Six: The Theme of Identity March 24  
    • 102. PART 2 Contemporary Practices 4 Lecture Seven: The Themes of Place and Space March 31   Lecture Eight: The Themes of Narrative and Myth April 7   Lecture Nine: The Themes of Green and Ecology April 14   Lecture Ten: The Themes of Power and Protest April 21   Lecture Eleven: The Themes of Humor and Loss April 28   Lecture Twelve: The Themes of Romance and Realism May 5   Lecture Thirteen: Artists to Watch into the Millennia May 12  
    • 103. In Memoriam Nancy Spero 1926- 2009 Take No Prisoners (2007) Installation at the Venice Biennale