The Artist, Collective Memory,and Crisis of the Natural andUnnatural KindJanuary 27, 2010A Lecture to Jagalonian Universit...
From an artist’s point of view….Where does art come from?
Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion?       re-presentation ?              ???
Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion?       re-presentation ?              ???
Johannes Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, c. 1664
Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion?       re-presentation ?              ???
Edgar Degas, Ballet Rehearsal on Stage, c. 1874,
Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion?       re-presentation ?              ???
Matthew Barney, Film Still from the Cremaster Series, c. 1992
Hieronymus Bosch , The Last Judgment, c. 1482
“All that you can imagine, you already know”            - Sir Stephen Spender
Where does art come from?   memory? Imagination?         experience? Representation? Passion?      re-presentation ?      ...
Francisco de Goya’sDisasters of War SeriesThe National Museum, Krakow 1807-14 Peninsula WarCreated in 1812-14 Published in...
Goya With Reason or Without
Goya What Courage
Goya They Do Not Want To
Goya And There is No Remedy
Goya What More Can Be Done
Goya Bury Them and Be Silent
HURRICANE KATRINA August 29, 2005
Riverboat on MIssissippi
French Quarter “Shotgun” house
Mardi Gras beads
Café DuMonde at late night
Lucky Dogs on Bourbon Street
Riverfront at Night
80% of the City flooded
Malcolm McClay
0%Malcolm McClayMalcolm McClayLino Cut Print
Untitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
Untitled(2007)Archival Digital PrintMalcolm McClay
Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
Generic ArtSolutions
FloodlinesDebra Howell
FloodlinesKrista Jurisch
FloodlinesJan Gilbert
http://artinaction-nola.blogspot.com/
Floodwall by Jana Napoli
http://www.floodwall.org
http://www.floodwall.orgWhat will come out of Haiti?
Children’s Art after the2005 Indonesian Tsunami
This painting was drawn by a child from a town close to the epicenter,where 8,200 people drowned in 20 minutes
They also show the effect on property –and how some people survived the huge wave.
Sri Lanka was a holiday paradise for holidaymakers before the tsunami..
Source http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/4075970.stm
The Holocaust
The Holocaust         Camp ArtSurvivor Memory-Based Art   Nazi Propaganda Art     “Degenerate” Art
http://www.thejewishmuseum.orgMayer KirshenblattGalacia Museum in Krakow
Town Panorama (1994) Opatow Poland or “Apt” in Yiddish
Mother Giving Birth to My Brother Vadye(1994)
The Kitchen (1994)
The Pisher(1994)
Jadwiga Washing Laundry (1992)
Mother Blessing the Sabbath Candles (1995)
The Gramaphone(1999)
Synagogue (1994)
Town Panorama (1994)
Market Day (1992)
Market Day (1992)
The Kleptomaniac Slipping a Fish Down Her Bosom (1995)
New Bermedresh: Playing Soccer (1992)
MoyreShimhe’sKhayder(1991)
The Boy in the White Pajamas (1992)
“We shall discover and encourage the artists  who are able to impress upon the State of the  German people the cultural st...
Nazi Approved Art
Arno BreckerPreparedness
Adolph Wissel (1939) Family from Kahlenberg
Ernst Leiberman (1939) By the Water
Marc Chagall (1915) The Kiss
Ghetto and Camp Art
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEKBackground
Prior to World War II, Siwek studied at the Kraków Academy of Fine Arts and worked for theKraków...
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Interrogation in Cell Block 11
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK A Group of New Arrivals
http://remember.org/then-and-now/tn04.html
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Summary Court Marshall
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Selection at Apel [Roll Call]
WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Arrival of Soviet POWs
JaninaTollikA Street in the Women’s Camp
JerzyPotrzebowski Entrance to the Krankenbau (Hospital)
JerzyPotrzebowski
“NIGHT…. A brick has comeloose from the low wallseparating out cell fromthe next where otherlarvae sleep, moan, anddream u...
ZofiaRosensztrauchThe Last Execution
MieczysławKościelniak
You don’t have to be an artist to draw.Create a small scene fromyour life, at any age, that ismemorable.Use imagery only, ...
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
Holocaust + art
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Holocaust + art

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From an invited lecture at Jagaloneon Univ in Krakow on art and trauma/disaster. Holocaust begins on slide 63.

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  • The Peninsular War was probably the worst mistake Napoleon Bonaparte made during his lengthy reign over France - the attempted subjugation of Portugal in a bid to tighten his trade blockade of Britain.To get at Portugal, Bonaparte had to trick his ally Spain into allowing a French army under General Jean-Andoche Junot to move through its territory.
  • Katrina was a strong cat 4 at 140 MPH
  • Viewing the terrain of Birkenau today, it is difficult to visualize the conditions under which the prisoners were forced to work during the construction of the camp in 1941/2. A penal company had been formed for the purpose of digging an enormous ditch in Birkenau, called Konigsgraben (Kings Ditch), to collect the ground waters and to drain the water into the Vistula. The prisoners detailed for the penal company were to be killed afterwards, but before they met their death they were to be ruthlessly exploited for labor.
  • I included Arno Breker in this archive first because he was in a certain sense both the best and the worst of the Nazi artists. His technique was excellent, and his choice of subject, poses, theme, and so on were outstanding, but on the other hand, Breker was therefore much more directly and effectively a supporter of the Nazi cause. Had his sculpture been ugly, ambiguous in meaning, poorly-executed, or less directly associated with Nazi militarism, the negative effects on the world of his sculpture would have been considerably lessened. In a certain sense, Breker uses his numerous "naked men with swords" to unite the notions of health, strength, competition, collective action and willingness to sacrifice the self for the common good seen in many other Nazi works with explicit glorification of militarism.
  • Nazi Folk Art". The themes running through such works (and there were a LOT of them) are the virtues of the simple, natural life, living close to the land, and using muscular power to turn the land into a healthy living. This is a theme I find often portrayed in the more recent primitivist art of the environmentalist movement except that it tends to promote a more etherial or surreal notion of what "union with the soil" and "the simple life" might entail. More likely than not because rural Germans had some experience with "the simple life"
  • Marc Chagall was born in Russia in 1887. His life was deeply rooted in Jewish tradition and religion.
  • In Birkenau latrines were cleaned by hand, another strategy of dehumanization. Author Terrence Des Pres described it as an "excremental assault" and wrote: "How much self-esteem can one maintain, how readily can one respond to the needs of another, if both stink, if both are caked with mud and feces?" [Terrence Des Pres, The Survivor: An Anatomy of Life in the Death Camps (Pocket Books: New York, 1976) p. 66.]
  • http://remember.org/then-and-now/tn16.html* Charlotte Delbo, Night (from Auschwitz and After: None of Us Will Return), (1995) Yale University Press, p56.
**Charlotte Delbo, Morning (from Auschwitz and After: None of Us Will Return), (1995) Yale University Press, p62.
  • Moshe Rynecki was a painter whose work often directed attention to the persecution of the Jews. He lived in the Warsaw ghetto and died at Majdanek.
  • Holocaust + art

    1. 1. The Artist, Collective Memory,and Crisis of the Natural andUnnatural KindJanuary 27, 2010A Lecture to Jagalonian University CulturalStudies Program, Class in VisualityDr. Lori KentFulbright Fellow, Academy of Fine ArtsLeadbelly (1930s) “Ox Drivin’ Blues” from the album “King of the 12-StringGuitar”
    2. 2. From an artist’s point of view….Where does art come from?
    3. 3. Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion? re-presentation ? ???
    4. 4. Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion? re-presentation ? ???
    5. 5. Johannes Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, c. 1664
    6. 6. Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion? re-presentation ? ???
    7. 7. Edgar Degas, Ballet Rehearsal on Stage, c. 1874,
    8. 8. Where does art come from?memory?Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion? re-presentation ? ???
    9. 9. Matthew Barney, Film Still from the Cremaster Series, c. 1992
    10. 10. Hieronymus Bosch , The Last Judgment, c. 1482
    11. 11. “All that you can imagine, you already know” - Sir Stephen Spender
    12. 12. Where does art come from? memory? Imagination? experience? Representation? Passion? re-presentation ? ???
    13. 13. Francisco de Goya’sDisasters of War SeriesThe National Museum, Krakow 1807-14 Peninsula WarCreated in 1812-14 Published in 1863
    14. 14. Goya With Reason or Without
    15. 15. Goya What Courage
    16. 16. Goya They Do Not Want To
    17. 17. Goya And There is No Remedy
    18. 18. Goya What More Can Be Done
    19. 19. Goya Bury Them and Be Silent
    20. 20. HURRICANE KATRINA August 29, 2005
    21. 21. Riverboat on MIssissippi
    22. 22. French Quarter “Shotgun” house
    23. 23. Mardi Gras beads
    24. 24. Café DuMonde at late night
    25. 25. Lucky Dogs on Bourbon Street
    26. 26. Riverfront at Night
    27. 27. 80% of the City flooded
    28. 28. Malcolm McClay
    29. 29. 0%Malcolm McClayMalcolm McClayLino Cut Print
    30. 30. Untitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
    31. 31. Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
    32. 32. Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
    33. 33. Untitled(2007)Archival Digital PrintMalcolm McClay
    34. 34. Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
    35. 35. Malcolm McClayUntitled(2007)Archival Digital Print
    36. 36. Generic ArtSolutions
    37. 37. FloodlinesDebra Howell
    38. 38. FloodlinesKrista Jurisch
    39. 39. FloodlinesJan Gilbert
    40. 40. http://artinaction-nola.blogspot.com/
    41. 41. Floodwall by Jana Napoli
    42. 42. http://www.floodwall.org
    43. 43. http://www.floodwall.orgWhat will come out of Haiti?
    44. 44. Children’s Art after the2005 Indonesian Tsunami
    45. 45. This painting was drawn by a child from a town close to the epicenter,where 8,200 people drowned in 20 minutes
    46. 46. They also show the effect on property –and how some people survived the huge wave.
    47. 47. Sri Lanka was a holiday paradise for holidaymakers before the tsunami..
    48. 48. Source http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/4075970.stm
    49. 49. The Holocaust
    50. 50. The Holocaust Camp ArtSurvivor Memory-Based Art Nazi Propaganda Art “Degenerate” Art
    51. 51. http://www.thejewishmuseum.orgMayer KirshenblattGalacia Museum in Krakow
    52. 52. Town Panorama (1994) Opatow Poland or “Apt” in Yiddish
    53. 53. Mother Giving Birth to My Brother Vadye(1994)
    54. 54. The Kitchen (1994)
    55. 55. The Pisher(1994)
    56. 56. Jadwiga Washing Laundry (1992)
    57. 57. Mother Blessing the Sabbath Candles (1995)
    58. 58. The Gramaphone(1999)
    59. 59. Synagogue (1994)
    60. 60. Town Panorama (1994)
    61. 61. Market Day (1992)
    62. 62. Market Day (1992)
    63. 63. The Kleptomaniac Slipping a Fish Down Her Bosom (1995)
    64. 64. New Bermedresh: Playing Soccer (1992)
    65. 65. MoyreShimhe’sKhayder(1991)
    66. 66. The Boy in the White Pajamas (1992)
    67. 67. “We shall discover and encourage the artists who are able to impress upon the State of the German people the cultural stamp of the Germanic race . . . in their origin and in the picture which they present they are the expressions of the soul and the ideals of the community." (Hitler, Party Day speech, 1935)
    68. 68. Nazi Approved Art
    69. 69. Arno BreckerPreparedness
    70. 70. Adolph Wissel (1939) Family from Kahlenberg
    71. 71. Ernst Leiberman (1939) By the Water
    72. 72. Marc Chagall (1915) The Kiss
    73. 73. Ghetto and Camp Art
    74. 74. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEKBackground
Prior to World War II, Siwek studied at the Kraków Academy of Fine Arts and worked for theKraków Railway Headquarters.Arrest and Deportation to Auschwitz
He was arrested for resistance on January 14, 1940 and sent toMontelupic prison. October 8, 1940, Siwek was deported to Auschwitz, where he was assigned prisonernumber 5826.Art Produced at Auschwitz
He was initially assigned to hard labor in the stone quarries and becameemaciated and ill. Siwek was then sent to the prisoner infirmary, where fellow artist and prisoner LeonTuralski helped secure him an easier labor assignment with the painters’ labor detail. May 1941 throughSeptember 1943, Siwek produced calligraphy, portraits, landscape paintings, and hunting scenes for theSS. In addition to portraits of the SS families, he did portraits, in secret, of over 2000 prisoners.
    75. 75. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Interrogation in Cell Block 11
    76. 76. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK A Group of New Arrivals
    77. 77. http://remember.org/then-and-now/tn04.html
    78. 78. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Summary Court Marshall
    79. 79. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Selection at Apel [Roll Call]
    80. 80. WŁADYSŁAW SIWEK Arrival of Soviet POWs
    81. 81. JaninaTollikA Street in the Women’s Camp
    82. 82. JerzyPotrzebowski Entrance to the Krankenbau (Hospital)
    83. 83. JerzyPotrzebowski
    84. 84. “NIGHT…. A brick has comeloose from the low wallseparating out cell fromthe next where otherlarvae sleep, moan, anddream under the blanketsthat cover them – theseare shrouds covering themfor they are dead., today,tomorrow what does itmatter,… We feel that weteeter on the edge of adark pit, a bottomless void– it is the hole of the nightwhere we strugglefuriously, struggle againstanother nightmare, that ofour real death.”* MieczyslawKoscielniak, from the series: "A Day in the Life of a Woman Prisoner"
    85. 85. ZofiaRosensztrauchThe Last Execution
    86. 86. MieczysławKościelniak
    87. 87. You don’t have to be an artist to draw.Create a small scene fromyour life, at any age, that ismemorable.Use imagery only, no text. Unknown Artist (1944) Portrait of Albert Frecke

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