Asp New Media Art 2

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Asp New Media Art 2

  1. 1. THIS WEEK’S LINKS: •  Whitney
Biennial
 •  h,p://www.newyorker.com/online/mul8media/ 2010/03/08/100308_audioslideshow_whitneybiennial
 •  TEDx

 •  h,p://www.streamonline.pl/transmisja‐tedx‐warsaw‐wyklady‐zapis/
 •  The
Sound
of
Jupiter
(amazing!)
 •  h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3fqE01YYWs

  2. 2. NEW MEDIA ART ASP American Art and Visual Culture Dr. Lori Kent Spring 2010
  3. 3. 1950 – Engineering Research Associates built the ERA 1101, the first commercially produced computer. 1954 –Computer music performance at MoMA by the computer music center at Columbia University. 1964 – Marshall McLuhan publishes “Understanding Media” 1967 – Sony releases the PortaPak, the first portable video camera 1970 – The exhibition “Software” at the Jewish Museum, NYC, treats computer programming as a metaphor for conceptual art.
  4. 4. TOOLS Hardware and software… servers, routers, PCs, database applications, video and computer games, wireless phones, surveillance cameras, GPS, social networks, etc.
  5. 5. Vibeke Sorensen wrote in 1995 •  First of all, there are qualities unique to digital media. They include memory, computational prowess, high bandwidth data transfer, and high speed data transformation. It affects most fields of science, commerce, engineering, entertainment, and art. Being digital, they share a common structure and language, and are part of a continuum rather than completely separate entities. The most popular means for traversing this continuum is the Internet, particularly the data dissemination structure referred to as the World Wide Web.
  6. 6. The
old
days
were
not
so
long
ago!

 •  h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dZRNBmxm_E

  7. 7. NEW MEDIA PRECEDENTS
  8. 8. Who led the way? Dada, Duchamp, Warhol, Marshall McLuhan, Lichtenstein, Joan Jonas, William Wegman, Bill Viola, Vito Acconci, Bruce Nauman, Naim June Paik, and many more….
  9. 9. What do computers do well?
  10. 10. Combine?
  11. 11. Hannah
Hoch

  12. 12. h,p://www.sepiatown.com/

  13. 13. Copy?
  14. 14. Andy
Warhol

  15. 15. The
original
is
by
Walker
Evans
 ”Hale
County
Alabama”
(1936)
 Sherrie
Levine
“Aer
Walker
Evans”
(1981)


  16. 16. Spread Data?
  17. 17. Your
blog?


  18. 18. Focus on Idea?
  19. 19. Meirle
Laderman
Ukeles

 h,p://freshkillspark.wordpress.com/2009/01/

  20. 20. Mark
Napier

 h,p://www.potatoland.org/landfill/

  21. 21. Mendi
+
Keith
Obadike
 h,p://obadike.tripod.com/ebay.html

  22. 22. Experiment?
  23. 23. Man
Ray

  24. 24. h,p://www.etsy.com/shop/mumbreeze

  25. 25. Back
to
last
week…
 Your
million
zloty
on
ETSY.com?

  26. 26. $4,323.45
USD
 12335.21
pln

  27. 27. h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mvE‐Lgeke0&feature=PlayList&p=75F72B4DC91864D9&index=7
 Mumbleboy

  28. 28. Collaborate?
  29. 29. h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKmb2S5Lt8Y&feature=PlayList&p=75F72B4DC91864D9&index=0

  30. 30. Douglas
Davis
 h,p://artport.whitney.org/collec8on/davis/
 In
1995,
the
Whitney
Museum
acquired
its
first
work
of
Internet
art,
Douglas
Davis'
The
 World's
First
Collabora8ve
Sentence.
Commissioned
by
the
Lehman
College
Art
Gallery,
 Bronx,
New
York,
in
conjunc8on
with
"Interac8ons,"
its
1994
survey
exhibi8on
of
the
 ar8st's
work,
Sentence
is
an
ongoing
textual
and
graphic
performance
on
the
World
 Wide
Web
that
is
owned
by
the
Whitney
Museum
but
was
maintained
on
the
Lehman
 website
from
1994
‐
2005.
The
work
was
generously
donated
to
the
Whitney
by
 Barbara
Schwartz
in
honor
of
Eugene
M.
Schwartz,
her
late
husband,
who
together
had
 purchased
the
concept
and
a
signed
disk
with
recordings
of
the
first
days
of
the
 Sentence.
Visitors
to
the
site
may
add
their
own
contribu8ons
to
the
Sentence
‐‐
there
 are
more
than
200,000
to
date,
separated
into
twenty‐one
"chapters,"
in
dozens
of
 languages
and
with
a
remarkable
range
of
images
and
graphics.
Any
subject
may
be
 addressed,
but
no
contribu8on
can
end
with
a
period,
as
the
Sentence
is
infinitely
 expanding.


  31. 31. Participation?
  32. 32. Ctheory
Mul8media
–
dynamic
poetry
–
“Crosspurposes”
h,p://ctheorymul8media.cornell.edu/issue1/menu2.html

  33. 33. Stanisława
Drożdża
at
CSW
Warszawa
 h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtm9mlnPWGE

  34. 34. h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbyy5vSg8w8

  35. 35. “My
Boyfriend
Came
back
from
the
War.”

 Olia
Lialina's
my
boyfriend
came
back
from
the
war
captures
the
flavor
of
a
complex
 and
personal
situa8on
in
a
presence
that
reveals
an8cipa8on,
anxiety,
hopes,
 mixed
messages,
and
personality
transforma8on,
in
what
appears
as
a
mixture
of
 said
and
unsaid
expressions.
The
naviga8on
scheme
presents
opportuni8es
to
 pursue
mul8ple,
intersec8ng
threads,
crea8ng
a
web
of
possible
internal
and
 external
conversa8ons
that
become
realized
in
the
site
visitors'
approach
to
the
 environment
 The
ar8st
establishes
a
graceful
combina8on
of
image,
word
and
flow.
One
visual
 region
presents
a
non‐changing
presence
illustra8ng
the
boyfriend's
presence.
The
 rest
of
the
visual
realm
is
divided
into
mul8ple
sta8c
frames
within
which
the
 par8cipant
interacts
to
illuminate
conversa8on
elements.
This
work
has
a
 performa8ve
character,
and
I
found
myself
"playing"
the
frames
in
a
combina8on
 and
speed
that
matched
my
own
percep8on
and
interest.
A
built‐in
disappearance
 of
naviga8on
op8ons
presents
a
graceful
cadence
for
the
piece,
something
that
is
 par8cularly
unusual
in
the
more
commonplace
never‐ending
web
experience
 .This
piece
works
well,
and
integrates
the
medium
in
a
way
that
doesn't
get
in
the
way
 of
the
content
and
message.
 h,p://www.teleportacia.org/war

  36. 36. Organize/Reorganize?
  37. 37. http://www.moma.org/ http://www.potatoland.org/shredder/
  38. 38. BREAK
  39. 39. Create?
  40. 40. h,p://www.likeneveralways.com/uninspiredminimalistgraphicsandharmonica/

  41. 41. 1971 – Floppy diskette invented by IBM 1972 – Atari invented “pong” 1974 – Naim June Paik invents the term “information superhighway” 1976 – Wozniak and Jobs form Apple Computer 1982 – Time magazine declares the computer as “Man of the Year” 1985 – MIT Media Lab formed 1990 – HTML invented by Tim Berners-Lee
  42. 42. New Tool
  43. 43. New Media art emerged from its historical precedents. Originally a marginal field (in the hands of a few nerds) public interest grew out of a fascination with the potential of new technologies. In America, there was the “California Ideology” which was libertarianism and technological utopianism fed by “Wired” magazine.
  44. 44. 
Germany’s
first
computer
graphics
were
jointly
produced
in
1960
by
the
ar8st
Kurd
 Alsleben
and
the
physicist
Cord
Passow.
They
worked
on
an
analog
computer
which
was
 linked
to
an
automa8c
draing
unit
and
transformed
parameters
of
a
differen8al
 equa8on
into
devia8ons
and
disturbances.

  45. 45. Lillian
Ross
(1974)
Night
Scene
•

Computer
generated
etching
on
metal
plate


  46. 46. Charles
Csuri
(1969)
Un-tled
•
b/w
Plo,er
Drawing,
ink
on
paper

  47. 47. Peter
Kreis
(1970)
Compart
no.
11
•
Colored
Plo,er
Drawing

  48. 48. Tony
Longson
(1970)
Group
Theory
Grid
•
computer
assisted
pain-ng

  49. 49. Stephen
Bell
(1978)
Un-tled
•

computer
assisted
pain8ng
 Material:
Data
generated
using
Ranstak
program
and
"helix"
shapes,
 
plo,ed
on
newsprint
with
cyan,
magenta,
and
yellow
edding
1380
brush‐pens.
9"
x
9".

  50. 50. h,p://macke.informa8k.uni‐bremen.de/compartdb/d/
 DATABASE
for
Early
Computer
Art

  51. 51. 1998 – Netscape announces that it will make its source code freely available to the public 1998 – The Web becomes worldwide as the last 21 nations come online. 2000- stock market crash and bursting of dot.com bubble. 2003 – New Museum affiliates with Rhizome.org 2004 - Google goes public, IPO fetches 1.7 billion dollars 2009 – Facebook reaches 175m users making it the 8th largest “country” in the world
  52. 52. ARTISTS
  53. 53. Auto
Dregs
Recordings
 E*
Rock
Asteroids
(2008)
h,p://vimeo.com/2595795
 Dim
Dim
Split
(2010)
h,p://vimeo.com/2414569

  54. 54. A
Submission
Idea
 h,p://www.tedxpoznan.com/

  55. 55. Andy
Deck
 Screening
Circle
adapts
the
cultural
tradi8on
of
the
quil8ng
circle
into
an
online
 format.
Visitors
to
the
site
can
enter
the
drawing
area
to
compose
loops
of
graphics
 and
affect
and
edit
each
other's
screens.
The
pieces
can
be
made
by
one
person
or
 by
several
people
and
the
arrangement
of
the
segments
can
be
haphazard
or
precise.
 In
the
screening
area,
the
resul8ng
mo8on
graphics
will
be
on
view
instantaneously.
 The
Screening
Circle
(2003)

h,p://www.artcontext.net/act/05/screeningCircle/

  56. 56. Golan
Levin
with
Kamal
Nigam
and
Jonathan
Feinberg
 
The
Dumpster
is
an
interac8ve
online
visualiza8on
that
a,empts
to
depict
a
slice
 through
the
roman8c
lives
of
American
teenagers.
Using
real
pos8ngs
extracted
from
 millions
of
online
blogs,
visitors
can
surf
through
tens
of
thousands
of
roman8c
 rela8onships
in
which
one
person
has
"dumped"
another.
 The
Dumpster
(2003)
h,p://artport.whitney.org/commissions/thedumpster/dumpster.shtml

  57. 57. Marc
Lafia
&
Fang‐Yu
Lin
 The
Ba,le
of
Algiers
recomposes
scenes
from
the
1965
film
of
the
same
name
by
 Italian
director
Gillo
Pontecorvo.
The
original
film
is
a
reenactment
of
the
Algerian
 na8onalist
struggle
leading
to
independence
from
France
in
1962.
The
success
of
the
 actual
ba,le
for
independence
has
been
a,ributed
to
the
na8onalists'
organiza8on:
a
 pyramidal
structure
of
self‐organized
cells.
Lafia
and
Lin
recomposed
the
film
along
a
 cell‐based
structure,
in
which
French
Authority
and
the
Algerian
Na8onalist
cells
are
 represented
by
s8lls
from
the
film
and
move
according
to
different
rule
sets.
When
 cells
of
different
camps
intersect,
they
trigger
video
cells
displaying
each
side's
tac8cs
 (as
depicted
in
the
film)
according
to
the
rules
of
the
system.
 The
Ba,le
of
Algiers
(2006)
h,p://artport.whitney.org/commissions/ba,leofalgiers/Ba,leofAlgiers.shtml#

  58. 58. Mark Napier Mark
Napier's
Shredder
1.0
interface
was
first
revealed
in
1998.
The
 Shredder
1.0
web
interface
was
created
to
be
both
an
interac8ve
 exhibit
as
well
as
an
artwork
generator.
To
create
an
image
the
user
 inserts
a
url
into
the
Shredder
1.0
and
the
code
is
then
 reinturpreted
by
a
Perl
Script
code
created
by
Napier.[1]
Perl
Script
 is
a
stable,
open
source
programming
language
and
is
the
most
 popular
web
programming
language
due
to
its
text
manipula8on
 capabili8es
and
rapid
development
cycle.[2]In
his
piece
summary
 Napier
explains
that
in
his
view
the
web
is
not
a
physically
 representa8on
of
informa8on
in
the
same
way
a
magizine
or
book
 is,
but
instead
a
temporary
graphic
created
when
browsing
 soware
interprets
HTML
instruc8on.[3]
The
focus
of
Shredder
1.0
 is
to
reveal
this
hidden
truth
behind
the
internet
and
give
the
user
a
 new
interpreta8on
of
common
web
pages.

 www.potatoland.org/shredder/

  59. 59. Cory Arcangel Super
Mario
Clouds


 Super
Mario
Clouds»
is
based
on
the
«Super
Mario»
game
for
Nintendo’s
NES
game
 console.
Cory
Arcangel
hacked
the
game
and
modified
it
so
that
all
that
remains
of
the
 game
are
the
white
clouds
on
a
blue
sky.
Gone
is
the
main
character,
Super
Mario,
who
 the
player
had
to
guide
through
a
labyrinth
in
the
original
jump
and
run
game,
just
like
 the
obstacles,
landscapes
and
opponents
that
lend
the
game
its
narra8ve
structure.
 Those
people
who
are
familiar
with
the
game
can
imagine
them
on
the
empty
 background,
everyone
else
will
just
see
the
cartoon‐like
display
of
a
sky.
The
work
was
 created
on
the
basis
of
a
manipula8on
of
the
hardware
and
soware.
Cory
Arcangel
 had
to
open
the
cartridge,
on
which
the
game
was
stored,
and
replace
the
Nintendo
 graphics
chip
with
a
chip
on
which
he
had
burned
a
program
he
had
wri,en
himself.
 Cory
Arcangel
is
a
member
of
the
Beige
Programming
Ensemble
who
have
focused
 their
ar8s8c
programme
on
the
hacking
ethic
of
manipula8ng
exis8ng
technology,
 thereby
taking
the
modifica8on
of
legacy
technology
to
absurd
extremes:
the
group
 have
published
computer
programs
pressed
on
records
and
organise
an
annual
 compe88on
for
«casse,e
disk
jockeys.»
 h,p://www.coryarcangel.com/things‐i‐made/SuperMarioClouds

  60. 60. Harwood@Mongrel "Uncomfortable
Proximity"
is
the
8tle
of
this
on‐line
project
 created
by
Harwood,
a
member
of
the
Mongrel
collec8ve.
 Commissioned
by
Tate
Na8onal
Programmes,
it
mirrors
the
 Tate's
own
web‐site,
but
offers
new
images
and
ideas,
collaged
 from
his
own
experiences,
his
readings
of
Tate
works
and
 publicity
materials
and
his
interest
in
the
Tate
Britain
site.
 Related
cri8cal
texts
by
Ma,hew
Fuller
are
in
the
Connec8ons
 sec8on
of
the
Tate
web‐site".
 Hogarth,
My
Dad
1700‐2000
 At
the
TATE
Website

  61. 61. MIT Media Lab
  62. 62. DATABASE AESTHETICS
  63. 63. John Klima •  
 EARTH,
a
unique
geo‐spa8al
visualiza8on
system,
 culls
real‐8me
data
from
the
Internet
and
 accurately
posi8ons
it
onto
a
three‐dimensional
 model
of
the
Earth.
The
EARTH
soware
 accurately
posi8ons
real‐8me
data
culled
from
 the
Internet
on
a
three‐dimensional
model
of
the
 Earth.
Viewers
are
able
to
travel
from
layer
to
 layer
by
zooming
in
and
retrieving
imagery
and
 data
for
specific
regions.

  64. 64. Lisa Jevbratt 1:1
was
a
project
created
in
1999
which
consisted
of
a
 database
that
would
eventually
contain
the
addresses
 of
every
Web
site
in
the
world
and
interfaces
through
 which
to
view
and
use
the
database.
Crawlers
were
 sent
out
on
the
Web
to
determine
whether
there
was
a
 Web
site
at
a
specific
numerical
address.
If
a
site
 existed,
whether
it
was
accessible
to
the
public
or
not,
 the
address
was
stored
in
the
database.
However,
the
 Web
was
changing
faster
than
the
database
was
 updated
and
in
2001
it
was
clear
that
the
database
was
 outdated.

  65. 65. Flickrgraph Flickr
Graph
is
an
applica8on
that
explores
the
social
 rela8onships
inside
 flickr.com.
It
makes
use
of
the
classic
a,rac8on‐ repulsion
algorithm
for
graphs.
Start
exploring
your
 contacts
by
entering
your
flickr
username
or
the
 email
address
you
used
to
register
there.

  66. 66. Christiane Paul Mapping
Transi8ons
was
an
exhibi8on
curated
by
Chris8an
Paul
at
the
University
of
 Colorado.

While
dis8nctly
different
in
their
approach,
the
art
projects
 commissioned
for
Mapping
Transi8ons
are
all
concerned
with
the
visualiza8on
of
 various
forms
of
data
flow
and
data
sets.
Both
Mary
Flanagan’s
and
Lisa
Jevbra,’s
 project
explore
the
‘search’
as
an
aesthe8c
form
of
mapping
the
Internet.
 Flanagan’s
[search]
examines
the
search
engine
as
a
creator
of
context
and
 meaning
by
reconfiguring
its
content
in
a
way
that
illustrates
seman8c
levels,
 which
usually
aren’t
obvious
to
the
viewer.
Displaying
the
constant
stream
of
 ques8ons
that
users
ask
the
Internet—a
stream
that
ranges
from
the
ridiculous
to
 the
sublime—the
project
creates
a
topography
of
Internet
users’
interests
and
a
 map
of
the
func8on
that
the
Internet
fulfills
in
people’s
daily
lives.


  67. 67. John Klima Ecosystm
is
a
real‐8me
representa8on
of
global
currency
vola8lity
fluctua8ons,
leading
 global
market
indexes,
and
up‐to‐the‐minute
weather
reports
from
JFK
airport.
 Commissioned
in
2000
by
Zurich
Capital
Markets,
an
investment
company
based
in
 New
York,
ecosystm
takes
data
ZCM
uses
every
day,

re‐purposing
it
to
drive
a
3d
 environmental
simula8on
viewers
explore
using
a
joys8ck.
Ecosystm
consists
of
 flocks
of
"birds"
(each
flock
represen8ng
a
country's
currency)
and
branching
 "tree"
structures
(each
tree
represen8ng
a
country's
leading
market
index).

As
a
 market
index
advances,
the
tree
grows
new
branches.

If
the
index
declines,
 branches
begin
to
fall
off
the
tree.

Similarly,
a
currency's
current
value
against
the
 dollar
is
indicated
by
an
increase
or
decrease
in
the
popula8on
of
the
flock.


  68. 68. Mouchette.org h,p://mouche,e.org
 Mouche'e.org
is
an
interac1ve
website
created
in
1996
by
a
 pseudonymous
character,
an
Amsterdam‐based
ar1st
who
calls
herself
 "Mouche'e".
With
her
innocent
saluta1on
and
claims
to
be
"nearly
 thirteen"[1]
gree1ng
us
from
the
introduc1on
page,
what
ini1ally
appears
as
 a
personal
website
of
a
pre‐pubescent
female
ar1st,
evolves
into
darker
 themes
in
the
subsequent
pages.

  69. 69. h,p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSP8xm_gaK4&feature=video_response

  70. 70. DATABASE
AESTHETICS
READINGS

h,p://victoriavesna.com/dataesthe8cs/
 Chris8ane
Paul
‐
The
Database
as
System
and
Cultural
Form:
Anatomies
 of
Cultural
Narra-ves
 Lev
Manovich
‐
Database
as
a
Symbolic
Form
 Lev
Manovich
‐
Data
Visualiza-on
as
New
Abstrac-on
and
An-‐Sublime
 Warren
Sack
‐
Aesthe-cs
of
Informa-on
Visualiza-on
 BreN
Stalbaum
‐
An
Interpre-ve
Framework
for
Contemporary
Database
 Prac-ce
in
the
Arts
 BreN
Stalbaum
‐
APer
Land
Art:
Database
and
the
Loca-ve
Turn
 Lev
Manovich
‐
Social
Data
Browsing

  71. 71. RESOURCES: h,p://www.computerarts.co.uk/home
 h,p://www.wired.com/
 h,p://www.eai.org/eai/aboutEaiFaq.htm
 h,p://eyebeam.org/
 h,p://ctheorymul8media.cornell.edu/f
 h,p://www.likeneveralways.com/
 h,p://rhizome.org/


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