ASP 4 AAVC 1930-40s

1,870 views
1,661 views

Published on

This is a brief survey of the art and visual culture of the 1930s and 40s. As usual, this file is so large, you may just want to look at it here on slideshare.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,870
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The full clip can be found online in the Prelinger Archives or you can check out the DVD from PPLD. http://ppld.org/
  • 130,000 images
  • At 16, Parks found himself homeless and did everything he could do make money, from waiting tables to playing piano in a brothel to mopping floors. As Parks tells it, his first foray into photography came after he found a magazine left behind by a passenger on a train. A portfolio inside the magazine, documenting the terrible living conditions of migrant workers inspired Parks to buy his first camera, a Voightlander Brilliant, at a pawnshop in Seattle. "I bought what was to become my weapon against poverty and racism," he says
  • 7 children 32 years old
  • At 16, Parks found himself homeless and did everything he could do make money, from waiting tables to playing piano in a brothel to mopping floors. As Parks tells it, his first foray into photography came after he found a magazine left behind by a passenger on a train. A portfolio inside the magazine, documenting the terrible living conditions of migrant workers inspired Parks to buy his first camera, a Voightlander Brilliant, at a pawnshop in Seattle. "I bought what was to become my weapon against poverty and racism," he says
  • http://www.pdngallery.com/legends/parks/mainframeset.shtml
  • http://www.pdngallery.com/legends/parks/mainframeset.shtml
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • African-American Art Harlem Rennaissance A New Negro – A Visual Art Nationalism / Primativism / Atavism Aaron Douglas Lois Mailou jones Jacob Lawrence Norman Lewis Elizabeth Catlett
  • http://www.moma.org/collection/details.php?theme_id=10051&section_id=T000253
  • Gorky was born in the village of Khorgom, situated on the shores of Lake Van. It is not known exactly when he was born: it was sometime between 1902 and 1905. (In later years Gorky was vague about even the date of his birth, changing it from year to year.) In 1910 his father emigrated to America to avoid the draft, leaving his family behind in the town of Van.
  • André Breton, the leader of the Surrealist group, assigned this work its title based on a meal he shared with Gorky, during which Breton associated an artichoke leaf with an owl. Both artists were members of the European artistic avant-garde living in exile in New York during World War II. Gorky's interest in unpremeditated or automatic gestures was aided by his use of thin, liquid paint, which he poured onto the canvas, allowing it to seep freely into the support. The shapes in this painting, while vaguely recognizable, never fully describe any one thing and therefore encourage free association— a mainstay of Surrealist intellectual activities.
  • his oeuvre is a phenomenal achievement in its own right, synthesizing Surrealism and the sensuous color and painterliness of the School of Paris with his own highly personal formal vocabulary.
  • He was born in Philadelphia to Edward Wyatt Davis and Helen Stuart Davis. His parents both worked in the arts. His father was the art editor of the Philadelphia Press while his mother was a sculptor. Davis studied painting, and art under Robert Henri, the leader of the early modern art group the Eight; he was one of the youngest painters to exhibit in the controversial Armory Show of 1913.
  • his oeuvre is a phenomenal achievement in its own right, synthesizing Surrealism and the sensuous color and painterliness of the School of Paris with his own highly personal formal vocabulary.
  • his oeuvre is a phenomenal achievement in its own right, synthesizing Surrealism and the sensuous color and painterliness of the School of Paris with his own highly personal formal vocabulary.
  • http://www.moma.org/collection/details.php?theme_id=10051&section_id=T000253
  • Painting to make meaning.
  • http://www.moma.org/collection/details.php?theme_id=10051&section_id=T000253
  • Painting to make meaning.
  • http://www.moma.org/collection/details.php?theme_id=10051&section_id=T000253
  • ASP 4 AAVC 1930-40s

    1. 1. A visit to America The Depression & War Years Introduction to American Art and Visual Culture – Lecture 4
    2. 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3CcAD_seww
    3. 3. 1930s
    4. 4. 1930s •  Art was patronized by US government; i.e.. photography and murals. •  Racial/ethnic-based enclaves emerged. • Social realism documented lives of America’s poor.
    5. 5. Population of US 1930
    6. 6. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3L8IseE7W-Q
    7. 7. (Lee Russell (1939) Abandoned house, surrounded by growing corn, McIntosh Co., Oklahoma
    8. 8. (Lee Russell (1939) Interior of Framhouse, McIntosh Co., Oklahoma
    9. 9. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/fsahtml/fsasubjindex1.html
    10. 10. <ul><li>Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal cultural programs marked the U.S. government's first big, direct investment in cultural development. In many ways, they present a mirror image of today's federal policy picture: their goals were clearly stated and democratic; they supported activities not already subsidized by private sector patrons, rather than following private patrons' leads; and they emphasized the interrelatedness of culture with all aspects of life, not the separateness of a rarefied art world. </li></ul>THE NEW DEAL – Federal Works Projects
    11. 13. Interview Excerpt: &quot;Why did you start singing while you work? When I started peddling that was in 1932, that's when I started singing...'Heighho, fish man, bring down you dishpan,' that's what started it. 'Fish ain't but five cent a pound....' It was hard times then, the Depression, and people can hardly believe fish is five cents a pound, so they started buying. There was quite a few peddlers and somebody had to have something extra to attract the attention. So when I came around, I started making a rhyme, it was a hit right away.&quot;...On the street whatever comes to mind I say it, if I think it will be good. The main idea is when I got something I want to put over I just find something to rhyme with it. And the main requirement for that is mood. You gotta be in the mood. You got to put yourself in it. You've got to feel it. It's got to be more or less an expression, than a routine. Of course, sometimes a drink of King Kong liquor helps.&quot;Transcript #21051622 http://rs6.loc.gov/wpaintro/clyde.html
    12. 14. WPA Photographers: Dorothea Lange
    13. 15. &quot;Migrant Mother&quot; is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made of Florence Owens Thompson and her children in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. <ul><li>I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography, Feb. 1960). </li></ul>
    14. 22. Japanese Children ‘Pledge of Allegiance” (1942)
    15. 24. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4F4yT0KAMyo
    16. 25. WPA Photographers: Gordon Parks
    17. 26. American Gothic (1942)
    18. 27. Death Room (1949)
    19. 28. Red Jackson and Herbie Levy Study Wounds of Slain Gang Member Maurice Gaines (1948)
    20. 29. Dinner Time at Hercules Brown House, Somerville Maine (1944)
    21. 30. The Harlem Renaissance: 1920-30s
    22. 31. Jacob Lawrence (1942) Pool Parlor
    23. 32. Jacob Lawrence Migrations Series
    24. 33. James Van Der Zee
    25. 34. James Van Der Zee (1926) Alpha Phi Alpha Basketball Team
    26. 35. James Van Der Zee (1926) The Wedding Party
    27. 36. Elizabeth Catlett b.1915
    28. 37. Aaron Douglas
    29. 38. Aaron Douglas (1934) An Idyll of the Deep South , Schomburg Center, New York Public Library
    30. 39. Dreams Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow. -Langston Hughes (1902 – 67)
    31. 40. Archibald Motley Jr. (1936) Saturday Night Street Scene
    32. 41. Archibald Motley Jr. (1930s) Black Belt
    33. 42. Archibald Motley Jr. (1930s) Nightlife
    34. 43. Archibald Motley Jr. (1930s) Between Acts
    35. 44. Archibald Motley Jr. (1930s) Brown Girl
    36. 45. Archibald Motley Jr. (1936) Brown Girl
    37. 46. Top Hat (1935) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBOWnN3KRiA
    38. 47. TAKE A BREAK
    39. 48. 1940s
    40. 49. 1940s •  due to WWII, the art center shifted from Paris •  American absorbed Cubism, Surrealism, Dada • continued to develop “American” style; i.e.. national identity, urbanism and experience of living
    41. 50. Planting the Seeds of Abstract Expressionism American isolationalism/ regionalism Social conscious Reconciliation between the poetry of Surrealism and the spatial issues of Cubism
    42. 51. Painting in the 1930s - 40s: Arshile Gorky
    43. 52. Arshile Gorky (1926-36) The Artist and His Mother
    44. 53. Arshile Gorky (1936-37) Enigmatic Combat
    45. 54. Arshile Gorky (1944) The Leaf of an Artichoke is an Owl
    46. 55. Arshile Gorky (1941) Garden in the Sachi
    47. 57. Arshile Gorky (1931-32) Study for Night, Enigma, and Nostalgia
    48. 58. Painting in the 1930s - 1940s: Stuart Davis
    49. 59. Stuart Davis (1940 ) Seventh Avenue Style
    50. 60. Stuart Davis
    51. 62. Painting in the 1930s - 1940s: Georgia O’Keefe http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FhvyUq27t8 An amateur video taken of her exhibition at the Whitney.
    52. 63. www.whitney.org
    53. 64. www.whitney.org
    54. 65. Georgia O’Keefe (1930) Jack in the Pulpit IV
    55. 66. Georgia O’Keefe (1944) Cottonwood III
    56. 67. Georgia O’Keefe (1945) Pelvis Series – Red with Yellow
    57. 68. Painting in the 1930s - 1940s: Edward Hopper http://www.mfa.org/hopper/explore.html Hopper Interactive Sketchbook at MFA Boston
    58. 69. Edward Hopper (1942) Nighthawks
    59. 70. Edward Hopper (1939) New York Movie
    60. 71. Edward Hopper (1932) Room in Brooklyn
    61. 72. Painting in the 1940s: Ben Shahn
    62. 73. Ben Shahn (1931-32) The Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti
    63. 74. Ben Shahn Portrait of Myself as a Young Boy
    64. 75. Ben Shahn Blind Accordian Player
    65. 76. Ben Shahn Vacent Lot
    66. 77. Ben Shahn Handball
    67. 78. What then was I to paint? Slowly I found that I must paint those things that were meaningful to me–that I could honestly paint in the shapes and colors I felt belonged to them. What shall I paint? Stories.” – Ben Shahn
    68. 79. <ul><li>writer John Graham who befriended Gorky, Pollock and others, [wrote ] Systems and Dialectics of Art (1937) he justified abstraction as distilling the essence of reality and traced its roots to primitivism, the unconscious and the painter’s empathy with the brushstroke. </li></ul>AMERICAN ABSTRACTION
    69. 80. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6v7QfCxuvLo

    ×