Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Teaching Teen Readers:
A Top Ten Toolkit
Longwood Summer Literacy Institute
July 2011
Why is Adolescent Literacy Important?

• “Learning to read and reading to learn
are no longer seen solely as traditional
a...
Reading is a SKILL
• National Center for Educational Statistics
(1997) “states that reading attitudes deteriorate
and volu...
Reading Research
There is a co–relation between high youth literacy rates
and low crime rates, low unemployment and
depend...
In other words….

•We need to teach
reading!
• These strategies offered here to help you with that.
Toolkit #1- Interest Inventory

• Allows you to see where their
interests lie and find reading
material that connects to t...
Reading and Research Correlation

Sociological research of the digital divide has
suggested online research skills are oft...
Toolkit #2- Catalog Searching in the Library

• Collaborative lesson with
school librarian
Search strategies using OPAC
Pr...
Toolkit #3 – Shopping List

Collaborative Lesson with School Librarian.
•
•
•

Shopping List sheet
School Librarian will p...
Toolkit #4 – Library Scavenger Hunt

Collaborative lesson with School
Librarian
• After completing the library catalog sea...
Toolkit #4 – Library Scavenger Hunt
Toolkit #5- Someday List/Recommendation
Lists

• Through the Shopping List and
Scavenger Hunt, students can create
a Somed...
Toolkit #5- Someday List/Recommendation
Lists
Toolkit #6- Read-ins

Directions for read-in:
1.Select a book to read
2.Read for 5 minutes
3.Write on an index card someth...
Toolkit #7- Book Talks

What is a book talk? Any
discussion held about a book. For
example, a teacher or librarian
who is ...
Toolkit #8- Read Alouds
This isn’t your grandmother’s read aloud!!!

Interactive Read Aloud:
 Demonstrate your thinking o...
Toolkit #9-Most Read Books Binder

We call it our Check It Out Binder!
Students record a rating and several comments
about...
Toolkit #10- Using Children’s Books to Inspire
Writing

1. Choose a story that relates to a topic of studyeither as an int...
Bibliography
1. Ivey, Gay, and Douglas Fisher. Creating Literacy-rich Schools for
Adolescents. Alexandria, VA: Association...
Thank you!
Jan Collins, Reading Specialist and Lori Donovan, NBCT School
Librarian

Thomas Dale High School
Chesterfield C...
Jan_Collins@ccpsnet.net
Lori_Donovan@ccpsnet.net
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Teaching teen readers[1]_Longwood Summer Literacy Institute 2011

234

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
234
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Scan Steven Layne’s and Jane’s to hyperlink this slide.
  • Scan Steven Layne’s and Jane’s to hyperlink this slide.
  • Steve Layne- by modeling and discussing with students how books are marketed by publishers and how I shop for books, I am actually teaching the, a life skill that can serve them well as consumers in both libraries and book stores.
  • Take pix of library and put on this page.
  • Activity to do with participants
  • Transcript of "Teaching teen readers[1]_Longwood Summer Literacy Institute 2011"

    1. 1. Teaching Teen Readers: A Top Ten Toolkit Longwood Summer Literacy Institute July 2011
    2. 2. Why is Adolescent Literacy Important? • “Learning to read and reading to learn are no longer seen solely as traditional academic processes. To fully prepare students for life now and in the future, educators need to ask different questions: – What will students need to know in order to participate more fully in a technological world? – To act as productive citizens? – To become critical users of information? And – To live high quality personal lives?”1
    3. 3. Reading is a SKILL • National Center for Educational Statistics (1997) “states that reading attitudes deteriorate and voluntary reading drops as students progress through school.” • Students haven’t been taught to value books. • Most students don’t describe themselves as readers at all, let alone readers for life. 2
    4. 4. Reading Research There is a co–relation between high youth literacy rates and low crime rates, low unemployment and dependence on social welfare, and low health care expenditures. Similarly, high levels of adult literacy are associated with higher levels of employment and wages, lifelong learning activities, participation in society, and level of health. A strong correlation has even been found between literacy levels and the likelihood of time spent in prison (National Endowment for the Arts, 2007). 3
    5. 5. In other words…. •We need to teach reading! • These strategies offered here to help you with that.
    6. 6. Toolkit #1- Interest Inventory • Allows you to see where their interests lie and find reading material that connects to that child. • Two types –Teacher created –Student self-assessments
    7. 7. Reading and Research Correlation Sociological research of the digital divide has suggested online research skills are often not well developed among people who are online (Hargittai, 2002). When it comes to university students, especially beginning undergraduates, they are typically content to make do with simplistic “good enough” information search strategies — ease of access to information often continues to be more important than the accuracy of that information (Currie, et al., 2010; De Rosa, et al., 2006; Nicholas, et al., 2009; Weiler, 2005). 3
    8. 8. Toolkit #2- Catalog Searching in the Library • Collaborative lesson with school librarian Search strategies using OPAC Practice search activity Independent search activities Self- Assessment4
    9. 9. Toolkit #3 – Shopping List Collaborative Lesson with School Librarian. • • • Shopping List sheet School Librarian will pull books from all genres and reading levels Reading Teacher and Librarian will model Previewing Books – – – – – – – – – • Title Author/Illustrator Dedication Front Jacket Flap Cover CIP Page Back Jacket Chapter Titles Interior Graphics2 Students fill out Shopping List
    10. 10. Toolkit #4 – Library Scavenger Hunt Collaborative lesson with School Librarian • After completing the library catalog search activity and shopping list, students are ready to explore the physical plant that is the library. • Students will complete a scavenger hunt to find books to check out and create their Someday List. • Self-assessment4
    11. 11. Toolkit #4 – Library Scavenger Hunt
    12. 12. Toolkit #5- Someday List/Recommendation Lists • Through the Shopping List and Scavenger Hunt, students can create a Someday List of books they might want to check out. • Book talks, read-ins, think-pair-share activities allow students to share ideas and books in a safe environment. • This can be done in the classroom and/or library.
    13. 13. Toolkit #5- Someday List/Recommendation Lists
    14. 14. Toolkit #6- Read-ins Directions for read-in: 1.Select a book to read 2.Read for 5 minutes 3.Write on an index card something new and interesting you read about. 4.Share something you learned from the resource with others 5.Begin again with a new book
    15. 15. Toolkit #7- Book Talks What is a book talk? Any discussion held about a book. For example, a teacher or librarian who is trying to encourage others to read a certain book. Example of a student book talk. Book talk rubric
    16. 16. Toolkit #8- Read Alouds This isn’t your grandmother’s read aloud!!! Interactive Read Aloud:  Demonstrate your thinking out loud.  Model specific reading strategies.  Promote rich oral language and content area vocabulary.
    17. 17. Toolkit #9-Most Read Books Binder We call it our Check It Out Binder! Students record a rating and several comments about a recently completed book. Students use the book to help them find something they might want to read.
    18. 18. Toolkit #10- Using Children’s Books to Inspire Writing 1. Choose a story that relates to a topic of studyeither as an introduction or review. 2. Set the students up with an anticipatory set to lead into the reading of the book 3. Read the book aloud to students 4. Introduce the writing assignment. 5. Resources for lessons: 1. 2. 3. 4. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE OPENS DOORS TO MATHEMATICS Steven Layne’s site US History and Children's Literature Specific Novel & Picture Book Activities
    19. 19. Bibliography 1. Ivey, Gay, and Douglas Fisher. Creating Literacy-rich Schools for Adolescents. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2006. Print. 2. Layne, Steven L. Igniting a Passion for Reading: Successful Strategies for Building Lifetime Readers. Portland, ME: Stenhouse, 2009. Print. 3. Cull, Barry. "Reading Revolutions: Online Digital Texts and Implications for Reading in Academe." First Monday. University of Illinois at Chicago, 6 June 2011. Web. 13 June 2011. <http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/f m/article/view/3340/2985>. 4. Harada, Violet H., and Joan M. Yoshina. Assessing for Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners. 2nd Revised ed. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2010. Print.
    20. 20. Thank you! Jan Collins, Reading Specialist and Lori Donovan, NBCT School Librarian Thomas Dale High School Chesterfield County Public Schools
    21. 21. Jan_Collins@ccpsnet.net Lori_Donovan@ccpsnet.net
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×