Global imprint of climate change on marine life

580 views
436 views

Published on

Discussion of the global imprint of climate change on marine life by Marianne Cartagena, UPR Rio Piedras

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
580
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
101
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Global imprint of climate change on marine life

  1. 1. Global imprint of climate change on marine life By: Elvira S. Poloczanska et al. (2013) Marianne Cartagena Colón CIAM 6117 October 30, 2013
  2. 2. General definitions • Isotherm = A line drawn on a weather map or chart linking all  points of equal or constant temperature.
  3. 3. General definitions • Phenology = is the study of plants and animals life cycle events and  how these are influenced by seasonal and inter‐annual variations in  climate, as well as habitat factors. • Taxon = it is a group of related organisms, which have been grouped,  by assigning him to the group a name, and a description in a given  classification. • Meta‐analysis =  is the use of statistical methods to combine results  of several individual studies but similar experiments in order to test  the pooled data for statistical significance. The appropriate way to  combine evidence across all the studies so as to reduce sampling  error and increase the power of the investigation, and in some  instance to resolve the inconsistencies among the study results.   
  4. 4. Introduction • Revision of Literature • Isotherms at the ocean surface have moved at comparable or faster  rates than isotherms over land during the past 50 years (1960 ‐ 2009).  • Winter and spring temperatures, over both the ocean and land, are  warming fastest than the other seasons. • In addition, anthropogenic CO₂ uptake by the oceans is altering  seawater carbonate chemistry, which can reduce calcification rates.
  5. 5. Introduction • They investigated the peer‐reviewed literature that  addresses the question of whether or not climate change  impacts marine ecological phenomena,  • Found 208 studies of 857 species and assemblages.  • Extracted 1,735 observations; ≥ 19 years span  • Subsets of observations of 30 years or more • Define an observation as a single biological response  (classified into phenology, distribution, abundance,  community composition, demography or calcification) that  was tested, or at a minimum discussed, in relation to  expected impacts of recent climate change.
  6. 6. Methods • Inclusion criteria  • Authors inferred or directly tested for trends in biological and climatic  variables;  • Data after 1990 were included;  • To minimize the chance of bias resulting from short‐term, observations  spanned at least 19 years.  • Data from continuous data series, intermittent data series and  comparisons of two periods in time. • From each study they extracted data on the characteristics of  observations including location and duration of study, the number of  data points collected, and the direction of observed change in the  biological parameter
  7. 7. Methods • Supplementary methods to compare • Spring phenology responses were similarly matched to  seasonal shift values for April (Northern Hemisphere)  and October (Southern Hemisphere). • Most reports were from Northern Hemisphere  temperate oceans
  8. 8. Figure 1: Global distribution and regional location of marine ecological climate‐impact studies
  9. 9. Methods • Focus on Climate Change • Two‐way analysis of variance – Test of F • To estimate mean shifts in distribution and phenology among  marine taxonomic or functional groups • Biological response method  • Changes in distribution, abundance, phenology and community  structure, over the period during which climate change has been  unequivocally linked to the rise of greenhouse gases, infers that  anthropogenic climate change is, in part, a causal driver.  • Hypothesis that marine responses were equally likely in either  direction, as assessed by a Binomial test against 0.5, the value  expected if changes were random. • P value of: p < 0:001; p < 0:01; p < 0:05).
  10. 10. Findings • The number of studies and number of observations (taxonomic or functional groups) from studies are given, together with a breakdown of studies by realm. The criteria for data inclusion are outlined for each study.
  11. 11. Figure 2: Global response rates to climate change by taxon. Rates of change (means ± s.e.m) of marine taxonomic or  functional groups in distribution at the leading  edges (red circles), trailing  edges (brown triangles) and  from all data regardless of  range location (black squares) Negative phenological changes  (generally earlier) and positive  distribution changes (generally  poleward into previously cooler  waters) are consistent with  warming.
  12. 12. Response  type Latitudinal  zone Taxonomic or functional group  Figure 4: Proportion of marine observations consistent with climate change predictions using observations from both single and multispecies studies (all, n = 1,323) and multispecies studies alone (n = 1,151).
  13. 13. Oceans currents…
  14. 14. Conclusions • Global responses of marine species revealed here  demonstrate a strong fingerprint of this anthropogenic  climate change on marine life.  • Differences in rates of change with climate change  amongst species and populations suggest species'  interactions and marine ecosystem functions may be  substantially reorganized at the regional scale,  potentially triggering a range of cascading effects. 
  15. 15. Conclusion • Significantly, 24% of the species in our database showed no  response, which may arise from diverse circumstances  including limited observational resolution, poor process  understanding, antagonistic and synergistic interactions  among multiple drivers of change, and evolutionary  adaptation. • They did not find a relationship between regional shifts in  spring phenology and the seasonality of temperature.  • Rates of observed shifts in species’ distributions and  phenology are comparable to, or greater, than those for  terrestrial systems.
  16. 16. Thank you!

×