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Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
Australian Open Source Implementations
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Australian Open Source Implementations

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Addresses the changing face of the open source market and adoption in Australia. Offers considerations and implications for open source implementations in large enterprises.

Addresses the changing face of the open source market and adoption in Australia. Offers considerations and implications for open source implementations in large enterprises.

Published in: Business, Technology
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  • 1. Open Source Implementation Today and Beyond Sam Higgins Research Director 8 March 2007
  • 2. Agenda
    • The Open Source journey
    • Open Source today
    • Changing face of the Open Source market
    • Australian trends in Open Source adoption
    • Considerations and implications for implementation
  • 3. Open Source has a long history
  • 4. Open Source as we know it today
    • The term Open Source…
    • “… is applied to the source code for a given software product that is made available to the general public with relaxed (or non-existent) intellectual property restrictions. This allows members of the community to create user-generated software content through either incremental individual effort, or co-ordinated open collaboration”
    • But where are Open Source approaches being applied?
  • 5. Open Source is everywhere Applications Information Business Infrastructure Connectivity
    • Business Process Management - jBPM and Intalio BPMS, Project Agila
    • Document / Records Management - xinco DMS
    • Content Management - Joomla, Word Press Mambo, MySource Matrix, Plone
    • Search - Lucerne, UIMA, Beagle
    • Browsers - Firefox, Opera, Mozilla
    • Desktop - OpenOffice, Open Workbench, GIMP
    • Email and messaging - Jabber, Ekiga, Evolution, Thunderbird
    • Business - SugarCRM, TinyERP, Compiere, OsCommerce
    • Development Platforms - Java, PHP, Eclipse, Perl
    • Web and application servers - Apache, JBoss, Tomcat, Zope
    • Databases - MySQL, PostgreSQL, Ingres
    • Operating Systems – Linux, TinyOS, OpenSolaris
    • Voice - Asterisk
    • Network Management - OpenNMS, Nagios
    • Directories - OpenLDAP, OpenDS
  • 6. Changing face of the Open Source market
    • Divesting as a means to invest
      • IBM leading the “donation” race
      • Sun frees (most of) Java itself
      • CA spin off of Ingres Corporation
    • Consolidation as a mechanism to compete
      • RedHat and JBoss
      • Linux Foundation from Open Source Development Labs and the Free Standards Group
      • Novell and Microsoft Agreement
      • Oracle offering support for Red Hat
    • Imitation drives more innovation
      • Open Office
      • Tiny ERP
      • SugarCRM
    Harvard estimates $2.6 Billion invested by Vendors and VCs in OSS since ‘ 95 Source: Harvard Business School (http://www.hbs.edu/research/pdf/07-028.pdf)
  • 7. What are organisations using today?
    • Economic motivations are common
      • SMB it is reduced cost
      • Public sector it is good fiscal outcomes for tax payers
    • Usage remains predominantly technical
      • Data centre focus
      • Individual development projects
  • 8. What are organisations using today?
  • 9. Where do they turn for support?
  • 10. Considerations for implementation
    • Open Source often lacks the “vendor” role to create a solution
      • Organisations download buy Open Source in parts
      • 60% of firms make no active contributions
      • Many have not specialist skills in integration
    • Yet 70% of CIO buyers want “solutions”
    • So, look for solution stacks
      • Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP/Perl (LAMP)
      • Spring Framework, Axis, Struts and Hibernate (SASH)
      • Unisys OASIS
      • OpenGear
    • But keep in mind…
      • Integration can reduce flexibility
      • Local support remains the overall challenge
  • 11. Summing Up
    • Open source is not new and will not go away
      • It is now a serious commercial proposition
    • Australia has and is a key player in Open Source
      • MySQL was based on the local mSQL effort
      • Active open source usage
    • More business level applications are emerging
      • Awareness is lacking in regards to these solutions
    • Divesting, Consolidation and Commoditisation
      • Choice remains a key motivator for many open source efforts
    • Focus your implementation on known solutions
      • Looks for “stacks” offered with local support
      • Don’t forget to give back to the community!
  • 12. Thank you
    • Head Office
    • Level 30, AMP Place
    • 10 Eagle Street
    • Brisbane QLD 4000
    • Research Centre
    • 7/269 Abbotsford Road
    • Bowen Hills QLD 4006
    • p: +61 7 3868 4796
    • f: +61 7 3303 8445
    • [email_address]
    • Peter Carr
    • Managing Director
    • [email_address]
    • +61 408 344 405
    • Kristine Carr
    • Communications Director
    • [email_address]
    • +61 405 515 469
    • Sam Higgins
    • Research Director
    • [email_address]
    • +61 412 621 014

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