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Tomorrow's Learners, Tomorrow's Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions

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  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • “Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • IBM: Given current trajectory of these trends, it’s easy to imagine a world where customers purchase more through mobile devices than computers, where analytics drive the majority of real-time decision making, where cloud becomes the predominant IT delivery mechanism and where more ideas emerge from social networks than from R & D labs. Pacesetters are preparing for such realities. Are you?” (p. 3)ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • ECAR: “When it comes to device preferences, the usability afforded by the larger screens and keyboards of laptops trumps the portability offered by tablets, but the line between the two is beginning to blur.”, p. 5“Contributing to this transformation are four pivotal information technologies that are rapidly reshaping how enterprises operate: mobile technology, business analytics, cloud computing, and social business” (Lo, Wycliffe & Hupfer, 2012, p. 2).    According to Educause (2012), students are using a variety of devices for educational purposes, “These three devices cover students’ basic technology to create content for course assignments (laptop), to produce  a physical copy of their work (printer), and to transport their work between devices (USB thumb drive) 24 (see Figure 9)” (p. 24).“With regard to resources students use to facilitate their academic success, the greatest increases from 2010 to 2012 were for e-portfolios, web-based citation/bibliography tools, and e-books or e-textbooks” (Educause, 2012, p. 21).“Newly topping the list this year are students’ interest in their instructors using more open educational resources (OER), and simulation or game-based learning (GBL), while more use of course or learning management systems and e-books carry over from the wish list from 2011” (Educause, 2012, p. 10).
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • Descriptions of Learners of the Future Joyce Neujahr  Class of 2016Psychosocial development is differentThe first generation of digital nativesUCLA study every year of freshman classInsist they graduate in 4 years75% want good jobs and financial stability20% go to school close to home53% within 100 miles of home69% rate their own academic achievement above average or in the top 10%66% say the economy has affect their college choiceFewer live in residence hallsMore are working to cover the cost of collegeSocially immatureFeel the world demands perfectionUnrealistic high expectationsFulfillment in helping others but on their own terms Known as the generation ME or MillennialsMost wanted generation (births are planned)Smaller families are commonMore connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision makingStudents have not developed problem solving skillsAppear helplessAnxiety and depressionNot comfortable with self-advocacyDon’t assume students know how to problem solveGive specific, stepwise adviceEncourage self-advocacyGive them a safety netMedia & SocietyEncouraged to focus on selfSociety concern about self-esteem so everyone is special/gets a trophySocial rules are not important, individualism is paramountStudents expect to be treated as individualsRules apply to others but no them – entitlementQuestion authority, will appeal decisionsNarcissistic Digital NativesSocial MediaInternet information resourcesInternet for entertainmentInstant access to everythingImmediate feedback 24/7Sophisticated interaction  Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1) Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html Millennials are generally describe as being born between 1982 and 2000Come of age in a digital world with ubiquitous information sources and expect instant access 24/7Tend to procrastinateUnclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concernWeb searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validityView finding information as a product, not a processEnd result of studyMillennials search behavior may be problematicExisting search models are appropriate, it is the execution of the model within the context of the search environment that is at issueMillennial students know how to search and filter, but they do not believe that there is an objective standard to evaluate information and they have a non-critical view of information.More research about the causes of such perception should help us identify effective strategies to help students improve their searches.          Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Information Commons are popular with millennialsOften work in groups, Use technology avidlyCombine their academic and social lives Enhancing the configuration of services for millennials can assist in leveraging the value of the available content, hardware, software, and physical setting to support learning and academic programsUnderstanding millennial students’ lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them.  Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. This study offers insight into how information visualization tools can be leveraged to improve undergraduate search behavior.   Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think-debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Prefer to figure out technology – no instruction manuals for us, thank you very muchPlease don’t lecture us about IT systems – “technology is like the air” – telling us how to use it seems pointlessMultitasking comes as second natureWe are used to constant stimulation from a variety of media sources        Bierede, M., Bondi, T. (2012). Learning is personal. Stories of Android tablet use in the 5th grade. Retrieved fromhttp://www.learninguntethered.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Learning-is-Personal.pdf  Organic shift in educators’ approach to teaching, transitioning from primarily preparing and delivering content to the class to an environment where students independently seek out content and contribute it to ongoing classroom discussionEducator and students learned together, and from each otherThe teacher worked with students as a co-learner rather than as the authoritative source of knowledgeStudents became accustomed to seeking out answers to their questions and really enjoyed the freedom of learning motivated by curiosity rather than the extrinsic and intangible motivation of “do good in school”Teachers spent less time on teaching factual knowledge and spent ore time answering questions about root concepts, causal relationships and more abstract ideas that lacked definitive answersIndependent student work was purposeful and meaningful and teacher spent time coaching and guiding the students as learnersStudents chose to use their devices (laptops and tablets) in “snippets of time” for math, spelling, word games, reading, and other educational uses that matched their interest, level, and paceStudents essentially eliminated down time from their day while self-differentiating their learningPersonal devices with 24/7 Internet connectivity freed students from the traditional time and space limitations of learning in a traditional classroomThis project demonstrates that technology-rich environments, with personal devices for all students tailored to their preferences, and the freedom for every child to discover and develop and own her learning is a powerfully effective model for the future of education      
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Lola F. Francis Joyce Neujahr Kristin Echtenkamp Karen Tercho
    • 2. Teaching, Learning, and Technology (TLT) Committee Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) July 1, 2013 Chicago, Illinois 2013 ALA Annual Conference Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) is a roundtable of the American Library Association (ALA) and advocates library instruction as a means for developing competent library and information use as a part of lifelong learning. LIRT membership represents all types of libraries (academic, public, school, and special) committed to this goal. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Text to 678.667.8805 Email to lirt.tlt@gmail.com
    • 3. Teaching, Learning, and Technology (TLT) Committee Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) July 1, 2013 Chicago, Illinois 2013 ALA Annual Conference Teaching, Learning, and Technology Committee (TLT) This committee will be responsible for identifying and promoting the use of technology in library instruction. Special attention will be given to technologies that enhance learning and can be easily adapted to a variety of different learning environments. Activities will include assisting with programs, writing reviews and articles for the newsletter, and promoting research that relates to our charge. Liaison with ALA committees and groups with similar interests. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions
    • 4. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Committee Members Current Co-chairpersons New Chairperson or Co-chair Lola Francis (2010-2014) This could be you or someone Ava Iuliano (2011-2013) you know. Kristin Echtenkamp (2012-2014) L. Meghann Kuhlmann (2012-2014), Virtual Member Jeffrey Lambert (2012-2014) Corliss Lee (2009-2014) Joyce Neujahr (2012-2014) Victoria Lynn Packard (2011-2013) Elizabeth Psyck (2012-2014), Virtual Member Eric Resnis (2009-2013), Virtual Member Sarah I. Smith (2011-2013) Karen Tercho (2012-2014), Virtual Member
    • 5. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Voluntary Participation Engage your class using any device. Socrative is a smart student (attendee) response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Socrative
    • 6. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Voluntary Participation 1.Go to m.socrative.com 2.Enter 383893 (room number)
    • 7. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Networking Opportunity 1. If you are sitting at a table where you know everyone, then switch to a different table and introduce yourself. (You can take someone you know with you, if that will make it easier to do.) 2. If you are sitting at table where you don’t know anyone, then take a moment to introduce yourself to at least one other person.
    • 8. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Questions 1. What are the current and predicted trends with the use of technology (mobile devices, apps, gesture-based computing, gaming, etc.) in education? 2. How are programs being analyzed and evaluated? 3. Who are the learners and what is the learning environment of the future? 4. What are the concerns and ways to prepare or for which to think about preparing?
    • 9. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2012 Fast Track to the Future: The 2012 IBM Tech Trends Report GigaOM Pro: Mobile Industry 2012 Segment Analysis Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition Pew Internet: Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits Pew Internet: How Teens Do Research in the Digital World Tech2020 Report: 2020 Executive Summary
    • 10. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports EDUCAUSE (ECAR) • 195 institutions • 100,000+ students worldwide • Study focus • Students’ perceptions of technology • How technologies contribute to academic experience • How technologies contribute to academic achievement • Key Findings • Blended modalities and engaging learners is a winning combination. • The time has come to move beyond thing about individual platforms and devices. • Students believe that technology is critical to academic success and that it plays an important part in their future accomplishments. • Students want multiple communication options, and they prefer different modes for different purposes and audiences.
    • 11. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports GigaOM PRO “GigaOM Pro gives you insider access to industry insights on emerging markets. Focused on delivering highly relevant and timely research to the people who need it most, our analysis, reports, and original research come from the most respected voices in the industry. Whether you’re beginning to learn about a new market or are an industry insider, GigaOM Pro address the need for relevant, illuminating insights into the industry’s most dynamic markets.” (p. 61)
    • 12. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports HORIZON • Research in report jointly conducted by the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). • Funded by grant from Hewlett Packard (HP) • International experts in education, technology, and other fields serve as advisory board. • Three global editions: higher education, primary and secondary education, and museum education • Each report highlights six (6) emerging technologies or practices that are likely to be adopted within the next five (5) years. • Key Findings • People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want to. • The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized. • The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured. • The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators. • Education paradigm’s are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning and collaborative models. • There is a new emphasis in the classroom on more challenge-based and active learning.
    • 13. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports IBM Center for Applied Insights • 1,200 professionals who make technology decisions for their organizations • 16 different industries • 13 countries • 250 academics (same 13 countries) • 450 students (same 13 countries) • Study focus • To better understand how technology trends are impacting future IT professionals. • Key Findings • Four (4) pivotal technologies • Mobile technology • business analytics • cloud computing • social business • IT skill shortages • Security concerns are increasing
    • 14. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports PEW: Library Habits Survey “The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has taken a special look at readers between the ages of 16 and 29 because interest in them is especially high in the library world and the publishing world. This report examines how they encounter and consume books in different formats. It flows out of a larger effort to assess the reading habits of all Americans ages 16 and older as e-books change the reading landscape and the borrowing services of libraries.” Study Findings: • 83% of Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 read a book in the past year. • Among Americans who read e-books, those under age 30 are more likely to read their e-books on a cell phone (41%) or computer(55%) than on an e-book reader(23%) or tablet(16%). • Overall, 47% of younger Americans read long-form e-content such as books, magazines or newspapers. • Texas A & M Sustainability Initiative • 60% of Americans under age 30 used the library in the past year. • Many of these young readers do not know they can borrow an e-book from a library, and a majority of them express the wish they could do so on pre-loaded e-readers.
    • 15. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports PEW: Library Habits Survey
    • 16. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Research Publications: Reports PEW: Research Skills Report • Data collection was conducted in two phases • Phase one (focus-groups) • Phase two (online survey) • Study focus • The goal of these discussions was to hear teachers and students talk about, in their own words, the different ways they feel digital technologies such as the internet, search engines, social media, and cell phones are shaping students’ research and writing habits and skills. • Key findings • Virtually all (99%) AP and NWP teachers in this study agree with the notion that “the internet enables students to access a wider range of resources than would otherwise be available,” and 65% agree that “the internet makes today’s students more self-sufficient researchers.” • At the same time, 76% of teachers surveyed “strongly agree” with the assertion that internet search engines have conditioned students to expect to be able to find information quickly and easily. • Large majorities also agree with the notion that the amount of information available online today is overwhelming to most students (83%) and that today’s digital technologies discourage students from using a wide range of sources when conducting research (71%). • Fewer teachers, but still a majority of this sample (60%), agree with the assertion that today’s technologies make it harder for students to find credible sources of information. • Given these concerns, it is not surprising that 47% of these teachers strongly agree and another 44% somewhat believe that courses and content focusing on digital literacy should be incorporated into every school’s curriculum.
    • 17. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Learner Anecdotal Information
    • 18. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions What’s Out There Now? (Image courtesy of http://tech2020.wikispaces.com/2020+Executive+Summary)
    • 19. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions What’s Out There Now? Library Instruction Tools Research Skills • http://www.google.com/insidesearch/searcheducation/index.html Personalized/customized learning environments • http://www.cengage.com/mindtap/overview.html Paradigm Shift • Collaborative Learning and Assessment
    • 20. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions What’s Coming? Library Instruction Tools | Technology Tech2020 New User Interfaces (gesture-based computing) • http://research.microsoft.com/en- us/um/people/awilson/publications/WilsonICMI2003/ICMI%202003.pdf • Voice Recognition Paradigm Shift • GBL (Game-based learning) • Mobile • Virtual • Holographic • Robotic
    • 21. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Organizational Opportunity
    • 22. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 1 What are the current and predicted trends with the use of technology (mobile devices, apps, gesture- based computing, gaming, etc.) in education? SOURCE TREND ECAR Mobile devices Students: More open educational resources (OERs), simulations or game- based learning (GBL), more use of course or learning management systems, and ebooks. IBM Mobile technologies, cloud computing, analytics, and social networks.
    • 23. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 1 What are the current and predicted trends with the use of technology (mobile devices, apps, gesture- based computing, gaming, etc.) in education? SOURCE TREND GigaOM Pro HTML5 Apps Horizon 1 year or less • Mobile apps • Tablet computing 2 to 3 years • Game-Based Learning • Learning Analytics 4 to 5 years • Gesture-Based Computing • Internet of Things
    • 24. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 1 What are the current and predicted trends with the use of technology (mobile devices, apps, gesture- based computing, gaming, etc.) in education? SOURCE TREND Pew (reading) Respondent’s report reading MORE because of e- formats and reading MORE items in e-formats. Pew (research) “Google”ing
    • 25. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 1
    • 26. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 1 What are the current and predicted trends with the use of technology (mobile devices, apps, gesture- based computing, gaming, etc.) in education? Interesting facts: • ECAR reported that in one year’s time, from 2011 to 2012, the number of student’s using a smartphone for academic purposes nearly doubled, from 37% to 67%. • IBM reported that 65% of enterprise respondents to 2012 Tech Trends report a shortage in next-generation mobile software engineering skills. • Seventy-five percent of the academics and students polled say that, primarily because of the slow pace of updating curricula and the cost involved, their institutions can’t always provide students all the critical skills they need.
    • 27. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 2 How are programs being analyzed and evaluated? Evaluation should move away from simplistically counting and recording to a deeper engagement with the learner and their experiences, perceptions and feelings. This requires new skills and the development of methodologies that capture the personal learning experience. Stages in assessing impact: 1. Choose the intervention 2. Specify the objectives for the intervention 3. Develop success criteria 4. Identify evidence that needs to be collected 5. Select appropriate data collection methods 6. Collect and analyse data. 7. Present results 8. Feed into further developments/changes (i.e. start again) (Roberts, S. & Weaver, M.)
    • 28. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 2 How are programs being analyzed and evaluated? • Effective evaluation considers inputs, outputs and outcomes. • Embed the legitimate voice of users into any evaluation. • Early discussions about evaluation during stages of project. • Evaluate for accountability, development and knowledge. • Evaluation should be undertake[n] by multi-professional team of staff with different perspectives and skills. • Data collection should be done by multiple methods (surveys, interviews, focus groups, photographs, etc.). • Evaluation should be based on individual student experience. (Roberts, S. & Weaver, M.)
    • 29. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 2 How are programs being analyzed and evaluated? Definition: Learning analytics is an emerging field in which sophisticated analytic tools are used to improve learning and education. It draws from, and is closely tied to, a series of other fields of study including business intelligence, web analytics, academic analytics, educational data mining, and action analytics. Tools • Homegrown/internal • Springshare LibAnalytics • SNAPP • LOCO-Analyst • BEESTAR INSIGHT • Blackboard Analytics • Moodle Analytics • LiveText Techniques • Heatmapping (Crazy Egg) • Surveys • Focus Groups • Program review plan • Learner Assessment • Tests/quizzes • Projects • Portfolios • Simulations
    • 30. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 3 Who are the learners and what is the learning environment of the future? • Millennials born between 1982 - 2002 • Social rules are not important, individualism is paramount • Fulfillment in helping others, but on their own terms • Often work in groups, they combine their academic and social lives • More connected to their parents and look to them for help with decision making • Have not developed problem solving skills • Instant access to everything and expect immediate feedback 24/7
    • 31. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 3 Who are the learners and what is the learning environment of the future? • Web searching – proceed erratically and make only limited attempts to evaluate quality or validity • Unclear how they determine the validity of information gathered, or whether or not validity is even a concern • They know how to search, but don’t believe there is an objective standard to evaluate information • Non-critical view of information • Research about the causes of this perception should help identify effective strategies in teaching them • Understanding their lifestyle is key to developing a robust service program to engage and support them
    • 32. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 3
    • 33. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 3 #LirtTLT
    • 34. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 3 Who are the learners and what is the learning environment of the future? Learning Environment • Open educational resources: MIT • “Students continue to express an interest in learning environments that blend technology with face-to-face instruction”. (ECAR) • “Students expect their instructors to use technology to engage them in the learning process, and instructors are responding”. (ECAR) • “Students want access to academic progress information and course material via their mobile devices, and institutions deliver”. (ECAR) • “Students report that basic technologies have the greatest impact on their success”. (ECAR) • “Technology training and skill development for students is better than new, more, or “better” technology. (ECAR)
    • 35. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 4 What are the concerns and ways to prepare or for which to think about preparing? ECAR Recommendations 1. Continue to support blended learning environments. 2. Don’t underestimate the importance of technology to students. 3. Look to emerging or established leaders (other institutions, other countries, other industries) for strategies. 4. Develop a plan to learn about your students’ technology profile. 5. Work with faculty to experiment with open educational resources and game-based learning opportunities. 6. Develop mobile IT strategies that allow for cross-platform compatibility. 7. Prioritize the development or improvement of mobile-friendly resources. 8. Focus on training/skill building opportunities for students and professional development opportunities for faculty (and staff). 9. Don’t assume all students know how to use the technology they own as an academic tool.
    • 36. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 4 What are the concerns and ways to prepare or for which to think about preparing? GigaOM Pro Recommendations Trends to Watch • Smartphones • Video and connected home • HTLM5 Companies to Watch • Apple and Samsung • Microsoft and Nokia • Google • Research In Motion (RIM) • Hewlett-Packard • Amazon • GetJar • MVNOs • Hybrid Network Operators • Non-cellular mobile gadgets Further Reading • A global mobile handset forecast 2011-2015 • Research In Motion: future scenarios and its likely fate • App discovery: thinking outside the search box
    • 37. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 4 What are the concerns and ways to prepare or for which to think about preparing? Horizon Annual Reports • Keep your eye on the reports and make comparisons between them. • Look at and compare the higher education and primary and secondary editions. Challenges • Economic pressures and new models of education are bringing unprecedented competition to the traditional models of higher education. • Appropriate metrics of evaluation lag the emergence of new scholarly forms of authoring. • Institutional barriers present formidable challenges to moving forward in a constructive way with emerging technologies.
    • 38. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Literature Review Key Findings: Question 4 What are the concerns and ways to prepare or for which to think about preparing? IBM Recommendations • Watch the “pacesetters”. • Position yourself to be able to take opportunities when they appear. • Get involved—partner with for-profit organizations. Pew Recommendations • Ebooks and ebook devices • Do more outreach
    • 39. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Summary • Not-for-profit and for-profit institutions/organizations will continue to implement creative methods for recruiting and retention. • Cutting-edge technologies should not be incorporated into the learning environment just for the sake of having them. • Organizations should familiarize and update professionals with emerging technologies and generate plans for using those technologies efficiently and effectively prior to the arrival of those technologies—proactive vs. reactive. • Learners expect learning to be personalized and customized. • Technology will continue to evolve. • Keep your eye on the “pacesetters”. • Use social media tools to stay up-to-date on technology and learning trends by following organizations like Horizon, Educause, and Pew. • Students want technology used to engage them in their studies. • Students continue to want some kind of face-to-face or human connection.
    • 40. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Questions & Responses
    • 41. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Future Research 1. Learning characteristics of the growing population of non-traditional students. 2. K-12 distance education students. 3. Personalized and customizable learning and learning environments. 4. What are other industries doing? 5. What are other countries doing?
    • 42. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions References Connor, M., Browne, M. (2013). Navigating the information-scape: information visualization and student search. Reference Services Review, 41(1), 91-112. ECAR. (2012). ECAR study of undergraduate students and information technology, 2012. Retrieved from net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdf Elias, T. (2011). Learning analytics: Definitions, processes and potential. Gibbs, C., Kerton, D., Lamberth, L., Paolini, M., & Seals, T. (2012). Mobile industry 2012 segment analysis. Retrieved from http://pro.gigaom.com/2012/09/ mobile-industry-2012-segment-analysis/ Johnson, L., Adams, S. & Cummings, M. (2012). The NMC horizon report: 2012 higher education edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. Lippincott, J.K. (2010). Information Commons: Meeting millennials’ needs. Journal of Library Administration, 50(1), 27–37. Lo, J., Wyble, C., & Hupfer, S. (2012). Fast track to the future: The 2012 tech trends report. Retrieved from http://public.dhe.ibm.com/common/ssi/ecm/en /xie12346usen/XIE12346USEN.PDF Portet, S. (2010, November 4) We’re not what you think: Debunking the myths about millennials. Retrieved from http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/cio-insights/were-not-what-you-think- debunking-the-myths-about-millennials/39746573 Purcell, K. , Rainie, L., Heaps, A., Buchanan,J., Friedrich,L. , Jacklin, A., Chen, C. & Zickuhr, K. (2012). How teens do research in the digital world. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Student-Research/Summary-of-Findings.aspx Roberts, S., & Weaver, M. (2006). Spaces for learners and learning: Evaluating the impact of technology- rich learning spaces. New Review Of Academic Librarianship, 12(2), 95-107. Taylor, A. (2012). A study of the information search behavior of the millennial generation. Information Research, 17(1). Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/17-1/paper508.html. Zickuhr, K., Rainie, L., Purcell, K., Madden, M. & Brenner, J. (2012). Younger Americans’ reading and library habits. Retrieved from http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2012/10/23/younger-americans- reading-and-library-habits/
    • 43. Tomorrow’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Technologies: Preparing for the Predictions Contact Information Lola Francis ilolafrancis@yahoo.com Joyce Neujahr Director of Patron Services University of Nebraska at Omaha jneujahr@unomaha.edu Kristin Echtenkamp Reference and Instruction Librarian Northern State University Kristin.echtenkamp@northern.edu Karen Tercho Bryan College karen.tercho@bryanuniversity.edu