Industrial revolution

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Industrial revolution

  1. 2. Less mortality Population growth Agricultural revolution Enclosures Fertilizers Confiscation Farming machinery Comunications Roads Canals and navegable rivers Improvement in the trade with the colonies Athlantic triangle Industrial hand labour (workers) More capital: growth of banks More agricultural productivity Extensive crops: cotton Industrial Revolution Railways machinery Steam Machine Raw materials: coal
  2. 4. <ul><li>Reading Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Why did the Industrial Revolution begin in Great Britain? How? </li></ul><ul><li>How did industrialization cause a revolution in the production of textiles? </li></ul><ul><li>How did steam power the Industrial Revolution? </li></ul><ul><li>Where did industrialization spread beyond Great Britain? </li></ul>Main Idea In the 1700 conditions in Great Britain led to the rapid growth of the textile industry, which in turn led to huge changes in many other industries. A New Kind of Revolution
  3. 5. <ul><li>The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain. </li></ul><ul><li>It had essential elements for economic success </li></ul><ul><li>Factors of production </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Labour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capital </li></ul></ul>Britain’s Big Advantage
  4. 6. Agricultural revolution <ul><li>Factors for Success </li></ul><ul><li>Exploration and colonialism: raw materials </li></ul><ul><li>Seapower </li></ul><ul><li>Political stability </li></ul><ul><li>Government support </li></ul><ul><li>Growth of private investment </li></ul><ul><li>Research and development on farms </li></ul><ul><li>Jethro Tull , seed drill </li></ul><ul><li>Improved livestock breeding </li></ul><ul><li>Better varieties of food crops </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Population grew </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enclosure movement: specialization and productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Less workers needed in rural areas. </li></ul>
  5. 7. Seed drill gg Combine harvester , is a machine that harvests grain crops More production led to more capital , more banks and more investment Enclosure act
  6. 8. Consequences : <ul><li>Capital is invested in new industries, specially textile industries </li></ul>PEOPLE from rural areas emigrated to towns. Towns grew incredibly More need of transport : Steam machine Used in trains , ships and machines Need of raw materials and fossil fuels: COAL mines
  7. 9. Steam Powers the Revolution <ul><li>Steam engines needed large amounts of fuel </li></ul><ul><li>Wood scarce </li></ul><ul><li>Coal mining industry </li></ul><ul><li>Changing landscapes </li></ul><ul><li>Dangers of mining </li></ul>Coal for Steam Engines <ul><li>First successful steam engine in 1712 </li></ul><ul><li>Innovations by James Watt 1736 – 1819 </li></ul><ul><li>Steam power versus water power </li></ul><ul><li>Steam locomotives </li></ul><ul><li>Steamships </li></ul>Development of Steam Engine
  8. 10. Steam Tractor
  9. 11. Steam Ship
  10. 12. An Early Steam Locomotive
  11. 13. The Impact of the Railroad
  12. 14. Railroads on the Continent
  13. 15. Raw materials and fossil fuels needed: <ul><li>COAL IRON </li></ul>
  14. 16. Young Coal Miners
  15. 17. Child Labor in the Mines Child “hurriers”
  16. 18. Factory Wages in Lancashire, 1830 Age of Worker Male Wages Female Wages under 11 2s 3d. 2s. 4d. 11 - 16 4s. 1d. 4s. 3d. 17 - 21 10s. 2d. 7s. 3d. 22 - 26 17s. 2d. 8s. 5d. 27 - 31 20s. 4d. 8s. 7d. 32 - 36 22s. 8d. 8s. 9d. 37 - 41 21s. 7d. 9s. 8d. 42 - 46 20s. 3d. 9s. 3d. 47 - 51 16s. 7d. 8s. 10d. 52 - 56 16s. 4d. 8s. 4d. 57 - 61 13s. 6d. 6s. 4d.
  17. 19. Richard Arkwright: Pioneer of the Factory System” The “Water Frame”
  18. 20. Factory Production <ul><li>Concentrates production in one place [raw materials, labor and machinery]. </li></ul><ul><li>Located near sources of power </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a lot of capital investment [factory, machines, etc.] </li></ul>
  19. 21. Mine, Coalfields & Industrial Areas Coal is more powerful than water . Iron is more powerful than wood.
  20. 22. The Factory System <ul><li>Rigid schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>12-14 hour day. </li></ul><ul><li>Dangerous conditions. </li></ul>
  21. 23. Textile Factory Workers in England
  22. 24. Young “Bobbin-Doffers”
  23. 25. The Power Loom
  24. 26. Industrial Staffordshire
  25. 27. The New Industrial City
  26. 28. Early 19 century London
  27. 29. The Life of the New Urban Poor: A Dickensian Nightmare!
  28. 30. “ Upstairs”/“Downstairs” Life
  29. 31. 19 c Bourgeoisie: The Industrial Nouveau Riche
  30. 32. Crystal Palace Exhibition: 1851 Exhibitions of the new industrial utopia.
  31. 33. Less mortality Population growth Agricultural revolution Enclosures Fertilizers Confiscation Farming machinery Comunications Roads Canals and navegable rivers Improvement in the trade with the colonies Athlantic triangle Industrial hand labour (workers) More capital: growth of banks More agricultural productivity Extensive crops: cotton Industrial Revolution Railways machinery Steam Machine Raw materials: coal
  32. 34. Consequences of the Industrial Revolution The new Industrial city Urban transformations Pollution Living conditions Protest movements The workers' movement Marxism Anarquism Theory of capitalism: protagonists David Ricardo Adam Smith Thomas Malthus Industrial Revolution in the World
  33. 35. Compare Before The Industrial Revolution After The Industrial Revolution Power energy Social classes Cities Systems of production Economy (trade, capital, businesses, etc.) Transportation Population
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