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Do's & Donts in Preparing PowerPoint Presentation

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  • Design includes harmonious and appealing arrangements of layout/format, colours, fonts, backgrounds, images, pictures, etc. First principle is to be consistent and don ’t mix up different styles One of the key differences between an amateur and a professional Web site is consistency. Professional sites employ well-designed and consistent pages that are consistent across the site in their look and functionality while an amateur combines and mixes up so many things of different forms in his/her slides. The human mind constantly searches for patterns in all things that we see—that will establish a unified picture as a whole as well as familiarity. We get distracted when there are so many things of different kinds in what we see giving a burden to our understanding and thinking as well as emotion. So when we say consistent, it means there is a pattern, some uniformity and standardization, which can be easily understood and remembered. This refers to our colour, fonts, layout, images and even sound. When your site is consistent, you have a site that:   When you take steps to include consistency in your development cycle, the number of tasks is reduced and simplified and saves you time because some of the slides have already the same images and look. Using ready-made templates, layouts, and themes can save time when authoring new files, letting the author focus on writing the actual content. This is the reason why there are many templates offered by Powerpoint because it already give you the same animation, transition, layout, etc. Okay, let me show you a Powerpoint that I prepared where you will see consistency in design.
  • When you harmoniously combine colours, you attract quicker attention to the subject, reinforce impact and recognition, help in establishing powerful identities and brand, set a mood and emotion. We all know that colours also affect emotions – red makes us feel warm and angry; black, somber and depressed, yellow, cheerful, green, relax and cool; blue, also relax, etc. We choose colour combinations that are complementary to our overall design, support our messages/content and objectives. I think we have learned in school the different categories of colour combinations- you have the primary, secondary (mixtures of two colours from primary); tertiary (blending of colours from primary and secondary hues) and complementary are colours located opposite each other in the colour wheel. Most colours look great when combined with the shades in various values or intensities. These colour schemes are called Monochromatic , which consist of colours drawn from the same hue. Any three neighboring colours on a 12 part colour wheel make up an Analogous colour scheme. They are always harmonious as they share the same undertones: yellow-green, yellow and yellow-orange. Opposites attracts, even with colours, and that ’s how you get Complementary colours: they are the opposite hues on the colour wheel, that “complete” each other when used as a pair. Warm colours have cool complements and vice versa. Use colours such as purple and light yellow and bright green rather than all neutral colours in light shades (will make it appear dead)
  • If we are aiming for a clean look in the overall design, the content should also be simple. When we see a poster or a page or a slide full of letters and too crowded, we are turned off, and we leave the page. The same way, our slides should not contain too many words, many fonts and bullets or crowded with too many contents and messages because when it becomes cluttered, the information is more difficult to read. What we are aiming here for is readability and understandability. Keep the information in your presentation concise. The words that appear on the slide should spark the larger thought, not explain it. Follow the 7 x 5 rule, which limits the words on a visual to no more than seven words per line and a maximum of five lines, Headings or titles should be kept to four words or less.
  • With regard to font, the rule of thumb is to use around 36-40 pt size for headings; 24 ft size for the main points and 20 to 18 pots for sub headings, not smaller than that. Using a font that ’s too small. The smaller the font, the more difficult it will be for the audience members at the back of the room to read your information. Don ’t use more than 3 fonts as it will give a confusing appearance, making it difficult to follow the messages as you keep changing fonts and get a unified look or a pattern. You also get confused as to which messages or points are being emphasized when there are too many fonts. At least two font types for pure content and three if there are diagrams involving captions and labels. Using all bold is difficult to read as the spaces in between letters become tighter. Using all capitals also for enumerated messages appear as if they are shouting at you. Avoid using all caps and bold as they are meant to shock and turn you off before you even read them Typically, red has negative connotations. It ’s almost always interpreted as a warning sign or danger, and gives a shocking or destabilizing effect and emotion. Don ’t use difficult to read or uncommon fonts that might not be saved on other’s people computers
  • DON'T use dark fonts on dark backgrounds or light fonts on light backgrounds. Incredibly obvious as this injunction may seem, people do violate it often. DON'T use dark backgrounds in a poorly-lit room or light backgrounds in a well-lit room. It's hard to read off such backgrounds. This is one of the most violated principles in PowerPoint and our trainers here have repeatedly committed the same mistakes despite so many warnings already. Everyone takes it for granted that when they project their powerpoint on the screen, they get shocked at what they have done. Sometimes, what appears on the screen is different when it gets projected. On the screen light on light seems to be readable but when it gets projected on the screen, it becomes different. So to avoid this happening, please follow the tips above
  • 2. Don ’t use too many pictures and graphics which might take the focus away from more important items such as keywords and relevant dat. What does too many pictures and images produce? You get your viewer confused and cannot follow which one you are focusing on. Thus, there is no focus on the messages you want to convey because they get distracted from too many photos and images. It could also communicate wrong impressions and messages especially if you choose the irrelevant and wrong pictures. 1. Don't limit your presentation to what PowerPoint offers. Use outside images and graphics for variety and visual appeal, including video. A video"It helps with humor, conveys a message and loosens up the crowd and serves as springboard for the lesson. Do break your presentation or text with relevant images and/or graphics as people get stimulated with images/picture. But choose relevant photos or images. Do not use images just for the sake of using images or photos. Choose images that have connection to the message
  • The overuse of technological bells and whistles in PowerPoint presentations is an under-rated problem. Many presenters think, "If it's new and dynamic; it will make my PowerPoint presentation much better." There is nothing better than a PowerPoint presentation that is done professionally with only limited effects. Overusing animation. Animation is great for capturing the audience ’s attention and adding interest to any presentation, if used in moderation. However, when things are whirling, whizzing and zooming across the screen, they direct the people’s attention away from your message. They’ll be too busy trying to figure out how you got your visuals to do those amazing tricks DON'T use annoying/animated/busy backgrounds. These detract from the talk, and can make slides hard to read. DON'T use silly/gratuitous animations/clip-art, especially in a technical talk. For every animation you put in, ask yourself whether you really need it, and whether the slide can be explained without it. In my experience, the only good use for animation is to show a progression of events. In other words, if you want to say "Initially, the doodad is red, but when a full moon appears, the doodad turns green." then animation may be a good way to present it. Animation is attractive, but often unnecessary for presenting steps of a process or algorithm. It's completely unnecessary for backgrounds, individual bullets, comments, the first thing to appear on a slide, and so on. Unexpected animation. Be sure to rehearse your animated presentation before you give it. This ensures the animation you ’ve used is working properly and is appropriate for the audience. Don’t let any unexpected sights or sounds catch you off guard.
  • A common mistake is the overuse of PowerPoint animations and transitions during a slideshow. I'm sure you've seen what I'm talking about; the presenter that animates each sentence so it flies in, drops down, and explodes on the screen with an accompanying sound effect. What happens after that? Do you lose track of what the presenter is saying? Forget within three seconds what the point was because you were so focused on the effects that you missed the content? Avoid overuse of animations and transitions Reveal rather than push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly, turn on a candle rather than the headlights. Consistency -Once you establish a mode of changing from one slide to the next, keep that one consistently throughout the presentation. Speed - In general, transitions tend to be effective when they are not intrusive. In this light, slow transitions tend to be smoother and more pleasing to different audiences. Fast transitions, tend to be too abrupt and to attract too much attention to themselves. , it is your responsibility as a presenter to use transitions and effects to serve your communication needs   Here are my general recommendations to you for making an intelligent and effective use of transitions inside your presentations: 1) Scope - Use your effects or transitions to help clarify content and not to try to emphasize it. Reveal rather push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly, turn on a candle rather than the headlights. 2) Communication - Consistency among transitions leads to easier readability and will facilitate your audience in understanding your content. Once you establish a mode of changing from one slide to the next, keep that one consistently throughout the presentation. 3) Speed - In general, transitions tend to be effective when they are not intrusive. In this light, slow transitions tend to be smoother and more pleasing to different audiences. Fast transitions, unless very subtle and affecting only a small part of the screen tend to be too abrupt and to attract too much attention to themselves. 4) Culture - Transition need to take into consideration cultural habits, traditions and reading habits which may vary greatly from one country to another. 5) Results - Best transitions and effects are the ones that go completely unnoticed relative to the content being displayed by them. Like when you don't notice the turning of pages of the book in front of you, or the glass from which you are drinking, so transitions should serve the purpose of bridging or smoothing out the possible visual jump required to go from one slide to the next. 6) Attention - Use the power of your transitions to reveal information gradually. That focuses audience attention and improves the integration between your presentation and the supporting visuals. These are my simple rules for an effectively utilizing all of those visual ammunitions you have at your disposal when preparing a presentation. If you can master this lesson in restrain, chastity and zen-design you will see that when it comes to transitions and visual effects, less is always more .      
  • 4. Don't parrot PowerPoint. One of the most prevalent and damaging habits of PowerPoint users is to simply read the visual presentation to the audience. Not only is that redundant — short of using the clicker, why are you even there? — but it makes even the most visually appealing presentation boring to the bone. PowerPoint works best with spoken remarks that augment and discuss, rather than mimic, what's on the screen. "Even with PowerPoint, you've got to make eye contact with your audience," says Roberta Prescott of The Prescott Group, a Connecticut-based communications consulting firm. "Those people didn't come to see the back of your head." 5. Time your remarks. Another potential land mine is a speaker's comments that coincide precisely with the appearance of a fresh PowerPoint slide. That merely splits your audience's attention. A well-orchestrated PowerPoint program brings up a new slide, gives the audience a chance to read and digest it, then follows up with remarks that broaden and amplify what's on the screen. "It's an issue of timing," Kerr says. "Never talk on top of your slides." 6. Give it a rest. Unique from other products in Microsoft Office Small Business 2007 , PowerPoint is most effective as a visual accompaniment to the spoken word. Experienced PowerPoint users aren't bashful about letting the screen go blank on occasion. Not only can that give your audience a visual break, it's also effective to focus attention on more verbally-focused give and take, such as a group discussion or question and answer session. Distribute handouts at the end — not during the presentation. Some people may disagree with me here. But no speaker wants to be chatting to a crowd that's busy reading a summation of her remarks. Unless it is imperative that people follow a handout while you're presenting, wait until you're done to distribute them. 10. Edit ruthlessly before presenting. Never lose the perspective of the audience. Once you're finished drafting your PowerPoint slides, assume you're just one of the folks listening to your remarks as you review them. If something is unappealing, distracting or confusing, edit ruthlessly. Chances are good your overall presentation will be the better for it.  
  • Transcript

    • 1. POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS By Lois Villanueva DO ’S AND DON’TS OF
    • 2. I. Design
      • Keep a certain consistency in titles, backgrounds, colour, images, and slide transitions
    • 3. II. Colours
      • Monochromatic colours always look great
      • Neighbouring colours also look great together (yellow-green; yellow-orange, blue-green, red-orange)
      • Opposites attract (black and white; red and green)
      • Use vibrant colours rather than all neutral colours
    • 4. MONOCHROMATIC WITH AN ACCENT
    • 5. COMPLEMENTARY AND CONTRASTING COLOURS
    • 6.
      • Monochromatic green
      • Warm analogous colours
      • Cool analogous colours
      • Complementary/warm
      • Complementary/warm
      • Very warm
      • Pastel/cool
      • Dramatic
      More examples
    • 7. III. Content – keep it simple
      • Don ’t put too many words on a slide (at least seven words per line)
      • Don ’t use too many bullets or lines (no more than five lines per slide )
    • 8. Too many words
      • Animation is great for capturing the audience ’s attention and adding interest to any presentation, if used in moderation but if there are too many they direct the people’s attention away from your message.
      • If only the main points are on the screen, the audience will realize their importance but if you overwhelm your audience with techno-fluff, the audience will be left confused.
      • The overuse of technological bells and whistles in PowerPoint presentations is an under-rated problem because many presenters think "If it's new and dynamic; it will make my PowerPoint presentation much better. ”
    • 9. Compare to this…… .
      • Use animations in moderation
      • Only show the main points to make the audience appreciate their importance
      • Avoid overuse of technological bells and whistles
    • 10.
      • Animation is great for capturing the audience ’s attention and adding interest to any presentation, if used in moderation but if there are too many they direct the people’s attention away from your message.
      • The overuse of technological bells and whistles in PowerPoint presentations is an under-rated problem because many presenters think "If it's new and dynamic; it will make my PowerPoint presentation much better. ”
      Use animations in moderation Avoid overuse of technological bells and whistles
    • 11. Too many lines…..
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide.
      • DON'T use the mouse as a pointer. Pointer pointer pointer
      • DON'T use the edges of the slide. Some projectors crop slides.
      • DO use large fonts. Small fonts are hard to read
      • DON'T use dark fonts on dark backgrounds or light fonts on light backgrounds.
      • DON'T use dark backgrounds in a poorly-lit room or light backgrounds in a well-lit room.
    • 12.
      • List of reasons why children might be forced to work.
        • Lack of decent jobs for adults.
        • Large families require a variety of incomes to feed their members.
        • Some jobs require small hands and bodies (sewing, crawling in small spaces).
        • Agriculture jobs pay by the amount of produce picked. This system encourages families to bring more children into the field to help collect farmed goods.
        • Poor families can't afford to send their children to school.
        • It is cheaper to pay small children because they are less likely to complain than adults.
        • Many families around the world are unfamiliar with the rights of their children and deem it acceptable to send children to work.
        • Girls are often kept at home to look after younger children and do household chores.
        • Families think that school won't help their children survive. Therefore, they send children to work where they can make money to feed themselves and family members.
        • Migrant children don't live in one place long enough to attend school; instead they work in the fields with their parents .
    • 13. Cut into two or more slides
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide .
    • 14.
      • 6) DON'T use the mouse as a pointer. Pointer pointer pointer
      • 7) DON'T use the edges of the slide. Some projectors crop slides.
      • 8) DO use large fonts. Small fonts are hard to read
      • 9) DON'T use dark fonts on dark backgrounds or light fonts on light backgrounds.
      • 10) DON'T use dark backgrounds in a poorly-lit room or light backgrounds in a well-li t room.
    • 15. IV. FONTS
      • Use large fonts – 36-40 pts for titles/headlines and 24 pts for key points , not smaller than that
      • Don ’t use more than 3 fonts
      • Use visually simple fonts
      • Use more non-serif rather than serif fonts
      • Don ’t use bold font all throughout
      • Don ’t use all capital
      • Don ’t use red letters
    • 16. Do ’s and Don’ts of PowerPoint
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide
      40 pts 24 pts.
    • 17. Do ’s and Don’ts of PowerPoint
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide
      24 pts 24 pts.
    • 18. Do ’s and Don’ts of PowerPoint
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s laptop laptop laptop laptop
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on your laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DON'T require frequent mouse or keyboard interaction on a slide
      18 pts .
    • 19. ICT FOR EDUCATION PROJECT Sponsored by Quezon City High School International Alumni Association Reporting Period-Third Phase August 2008-May 2010 32 pt 20 pt 32 pt 24 pt
    • 20. POWERPOINT PPT 3 PPT 2 PPT 1 PPT 4 Planning Execution Testing Deployment 20 pt 28 pt 48 pt
    • 21. ICT FOR EDUCATION PROJECT Sponsored by Quezon City High School International Alumni Association Reporting Period-Third Phase August 2008-May 2010 Book Antiqua Bernard Arial Braggadocio DON ’T USE TOO MANY FONT TYPES
    • 22. Your text here Arial . Your text here . Apple Casual Your text here Brittanic Bold . Your text here Cooper black . Don ’t use many different fonts for the same set of points/ideas
    • 23.
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is same as your laptop ’s
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      • DO show up early for your talk to check whether your equipment works
      • DO check whether the projector's resolution is the same as your laptop ’s
      • DON'T leave Standby Power Management on laptop on.
      • DON'T leave your ScreenSaver on.
      ARIAL, SANS SERIF TIMES ROMAN, SERIF
    • 24. ICT for Education – Helvetica ICT for Education – Verdana ICT for Education - Geneva SANS SERIF FONTS SERIF FONTS ICT for Education- BASKERVILLE ICT for Education - GEORGIA ICT for Education -AMERICA N
    • 25. DON ’T USE ALL CAPITAL LETTERS
      • DO SHOW UP EARLY FOR YOUR TALK TO CHECK WHETHER YOUR EQUIPMENT WORKS
      • DO CHECK WHETHER THE PROJECTOR RESOLUTION IS THE SAME AS YOUR LAPTOP
      • DON ’T LEAVE STANDBY POWER MANAGEMENT ON YOUR LAPTOP ON
      • DON ’T LEAVE YOUR SCREENSAVER
      • DON ’T REQUIRE FREQUENT MOUSE OR KEYBOARD INTERACTION ON A SLIDE
      • DO SHOW UP EARLY FOR YOUR TALK
    • 26.
      • 1. Students are divided into groups and discuss which one they will choose, then they present their arguments on PowerPoint. To guide them in analysing and comparing the three positions, the students are asked to read this document (embed here your document on how to decide the right thing to do) as well as access the following websites
      • 2. After presentations, the teacher facilitates further discussions and stimulate students ’ reactions to the presentations
      • 3. At the end of discussion, the teacher summarizes the different points and make generalizations based on the principles of valuing….
    • 27.
      • 1. Students are divided into groups and discuss which one they will choose, then they present their arguments on PowerPoint. To guide them in analysing and comparing the three positions, the students are asked to read this
      • 2. After presentations, the teacher facilitates further discussions and stimulate students ’ reactions to the presentations
      • 3. At the end of discussion, the teacher summarizes the different points and make generalizations based on the principles of valuing….
    • 28. Don ’t use bold for key points --Use normal font
      • 1. Students are divided into groups and discuss which one they will choose, then they present their arguments on PowerPoint. To guide them in analysing and comparing the three positions, the students are asked to read this
      • 2. After presentations, the teacher facilitates further discussions and stimulate students ’ reactions to the presentations
      • 3. At the end of discussion, the teacher summarizes the different points and make generalizations based on the principles of valuing….
    • 29. Click the icon to see a scenario. Formulate your questions here. Click the icon. Show your possible answers to your own questions. Click the icon. Welcome to your First Activity
    • 30. Make good contrast between colour of fonts and background to be visible 1. Avoid dark letters against dark background 2. Avoid light letters against light background
    • 31. DARK ON DARK DARK ON DARK CONTRAST CONTRAST CONTRAST DARK ON DARK
    • 32. LIGHT ON LIGHT LIGHT ON LIGHT LIGHT ON LIGHT CONTRAST CONTRAST CONTRAST
    • 33. 2000 2010 2020 2030 This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks
    • 34. 2000 2010 2020 2030 This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks This is sample text, please replace it with your original facts and figures. Thanks
    • 35. Uncle Liu, 60, karang guni man Ms. Li Peng, 28, resident of Singa Estate The cleaner must be lazy, never sweep… That ’ s why the void deck is always dirty. Mrs Tay, 45, housewife My mother told me I will be fined $1000 if I litter. Fatimah, 8, student living in Singa Estate F EED BACK There ’ s no rubbish bin near my parking lot, so I ’ ve no choice but to throw the litter on the floor. Unnamed, resident of Temasek Estate Aiya, why must keep estate clean? It ’ s always dirty anyway... Recently, our estate won the Cleanest Housing Estate award for 2nd year again! Q uit N ext
    • 36. Uncle Liu, 60, karang guni man Ms. Li Peng, 28, resident of Singa Estate The cleaner must be lazy, never sweep… That ’ s why the void deck is always dirty . Mrs Tay, 45, housewife My mother told me I will be fined $1000 if I litter. Fatimah, 8, student living in Singa Estate F EED BACK There ’ s no rubbish bin near my parking lot, so I ’ ve no choice but to throw the litter on the floor. Unnamed, resident of Temasek Estate Aiya, why must keep estate clean? It ’ s always dirty anyway.. . Recently, our estate won the Cleanest Housing Estate award for 2nd year again! Q uit N ext
    • 37. V. Photos/pictures/images
      • Do import images and graphics to enhance your presentation
      • Don ’t use too many pictures and graphics
    • 38. CHILD LABOR
    • 39. The 2 suspects Is it Sgt. Paul Terano, a police officer who lives 100 meters on the next hilltop? Is it Ben Cruz who came home From college for the Holidays and lives 50 meters away downhill?
    • 40. Final test
      • NOTE: Click the icon to answer the final exam, then save the file to your desktop and send the saved file to: [email_address]
      Hey guys! Thank you so much for joining us in discovering Nuclear transformation. I hope both you and Carl learned something new today. He can now answer Mrs. Fowl ’s assignment. How about you? Can you answer Mrs. Sarigumba’s evaluation for you?  Click home if you ’re done
    • 41. Examples of too many images, clip arts, and pictures
    • 42. DO ’ S AND DON ’ TS OF POWERPOINT
    • 43. Click the icon to see a scenario. Formulate your questions here. Click the icon. Show your possible answers to your own questions. Click the icon. Welcome to your First Activity
    • 44. HOORAY!!! You ’ve got it.
    • 45. MAGNIFICENT. THANKS FOR YOUR HELP. So the three went home happy. They have been able to use their skills in math once again.
    • 46. Group Output Click to quit Make a poster with a slogan condemning child labor. Use MS Paint, MS Word or MS PowerPoint.
    • 47. VI. Animations and sounds
      • Don ’t overuse annoying animations
      • Don ’t use too many bells and whistles
    • 48. RED means stop YELLOW means prepare to stop or prepare to go GREEN means go
    • 49. Economic Growth Circular Flow Model Goods and Services Factors and Production Consumer Expenditures Wages Rent Dividends
    • 50. Economic Growth Circular Flow Model Goods and Services Factors and Production Consumer Expenditures Wages Rent Dividends
    • 51. Three friends . . . RADIX POLYN TRIGS Like to go to different places in the world. They love adventure & most of all they love mathematics very much. HOME
    • 52. Radix loves to simplify radicals. Trigs is fascinated for trigonometry. Polyn likes to solve polynomials, especially graphs. HOME They always bring their tools in math in their journey.
    • 53. VII. Text animations and transitions
      • Avoid overuse of animations and transitions
      • Reveal rather than push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly
      • Be consistent, do not change transition from one slide to another.
      • Slower transitions tend to be smoother and more pleasing while fast transitions tend to be too abrupt and to attract too much attention to themselves.
    • 54. Three friends . . . RADIX POLYN TRIGS Like to go to different places in the world. They love adventure & most of all they love mathematics very much. HOME
    • 55. Click the television to view the news: While watching the news, you remember your friend who is working as a child laborer to support their needs after her father died in an accident. http://www.gmanews.tv/video/17512/Police-rescue-16-child-laborers-in-Cubao-Quezon-City Scenario
      • The news caught your attention. Police rescued 16 child laborers in Cubao, Quezon City!
    • 56.
      • Avoid overuse of animations and transitions
      • Reveal rather than push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly, turn on a candle rather than the headlights.
      • Avoid overuse of animations and transitions
      • Reveal rather than push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly, turn on a candle rather than the headlights.
      • Reveal rather than push, subtly uncover rather than open abruptly, turn on a candle rather than the headlights.
      • Avoid overuse of animations and transitions
    • 57. First Prize 65% 20% 15% Flora Dimo Clora Second Prize Third Prize Grade 5 Grade 4 Grade 1
    • 58. First Prize 65% 20% 15% Flora Dimo Clora Second Prize Third Prize Grade 5 Grade 4 Grade 1
    • 59. Never use different text animations in one slide of the same object and related messages Name of Product A Name of Product B Name of Product C
    • 60. Presenting the total package
      • Don ’t parrot PowerPoint
      • Time your remarks
      • Give it a rest
      • Distribute handouts at the end
      • Edit ruthlessly before presenting
    • 61.