The ACP Pacemaker 11

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Transcript

  • 1. THE PACEMAKERRecognizing excellence in student media since 1927. ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS Logan Aimone, Executive Director This presentation is available at: slideshare.net/loganaimone Permission is granted for educational use.
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
  • 3. INTRODUCTION The Pacemaker is the highest honor in collegiate journalism. For decades, it hasrecognized trend-setters and go-getters, effort and enterprise, achievement and talent.
  • 4. INTRODUCTION The Pacemaker is the highest honor in collegiate journalism. For decades, it hasrecognized trend-setters and go-getters, effort and enterprise, achievement and talent.Today, the Pacemaker continues to recognize the best student journalism in the nation.
  • 5. KEEP IN MIND…
  • 6. KEEP IN MIND… The images seen in this presentation areNewspaper and Magazine Pacemaker Finalists from the 2010-11 academic year plus 2010 yearbooks.
  • 7. KEEP IN MIND… The images seen in this presentation areNewspaper and Magazine Pacemaker Finalists from the 2010-11 academic year plus 2010 yearbooks. Winners will be announced for the first time at Saturday’s awards ceremony.
  • 8. KEEP IN MIND… The images seen in this presentation areNewspaper and Magazine Pacemaker Finalists from the 2010-11 academic year plus 2010 yearbooks. Winners will be announced for the first time at Saturday’s awards ceremony.Inclusion of a publication in this presentation does not indicate status as a winner. Do not read anything into whether an example was included here.
  • 9. WHO’S JUDGING?
  • 10. WHO’S JUDGING?Pacemaker judges are professionals working in media as well as a range of experts familiar with student media.
  • 11. WHO’S JUDGING?Pacemaker judges are professionals working in media as well as a range of experts familiar with student media.Judges for the 20011 ACP Pacemakers included working professionals, veteran college media advisers, and teams from Quintessence Publishing and The Atlantic.
  • 12. WHO’S JUDGING?
  • 13. WHO’S JUDGING? Judging is by team. We ask the media organization to compile a group with representation from variousdepartments (writer, editor, designer, photographer, etc.).
  • 14. WHO’S JUDGING? Judging is by team. We ask the media organization to compile a group with representation from variousdepartments (writer, editor, designer, photographer, etc.).Entries are judged holistically. There is not a rubric with points attached to certain criteria.
  • 15. WHO’S JUDGING? Judging is by team. We ask the media organization to compile a group with representation from variousdepartments (writer, editor, designer, photographer, etc.).Entries are judged holistically. There is not a rubric with points attached to certain criteria. Judging is by nature somewhat subjective based on established standards of scholastic journalism.
  • 16. HOW DO THEY JUDGE?
  • 17. HOW DO THEY JUDGE?• Thenumber of Pacemaker finalists and winners is proportional to the number of entries.
  • 18. HOW DO THEY JUDGE?• Thenumber of Pacemaker finalists and winners is proportional to the number of entries.• The number is not fixed each year, but about half of the finalists will be named winners.
  • 19. HOW DO THEY JUDGE?• Thenumber of Pacemaker finalists and winners is proportional to the number of entries.• The number is not fixed each year, but about half of the finalists will be named winners.• This is a contest, not a critique.
  • 20. HOW DO THEY JUDGE?• Thenumber of Pacemaker finalists and winners is proportional to the number of entries.• The number is not fixed each year, but about half of the finalists will be named winners.• This is a contest, not a critique.• ACP asks judges to provide general feedback on the finalists. Some teams are more thorough. Comments will be shared on our website as part of the winners gallery and in our book, The Pacemaker.
  • 21. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?
  • 22. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content
  • 23. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing
  • 24. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing• Presentation: Layout and design
  • 25. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing• Presentation: Layout and design• Photography, art and graphics
  • 26. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing• Presentation: Layout and design• Photography, art and graphics• Reporting: Type and depth (newspaper)
  • 27. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing• Presentation: Layout and design• Photography, art and graphics• Reporting: Type and depth (newspaper)• Editorial Leadership (newspaper)
  • 28. WHAT DO THEY JUDGE?• Content• Quality of writing and editing• Presentation: Layout and design• Photography, art and graphics• Reporting: Type and depth (newspaper)• Editorial Leadership (newspaper)• Overall concept or theme (yearbook, magazine)
  • 29. CONTENT & COVERAGE
  • 30. CONTENT & COVERAGE• The publication should accurately reflect all aspects of student life, from academics to sports, arts to community news.
  • 31. CONTENT & COVERAGE• The publication should accurately reflect all aspects of student life, from academics to sports, arts to community news.• Newspapers should localize national or regional stories for their own campus communities. Wire or reprinted copy is discouraged.
  • 32. CONTENT & COVERAGEThe front page offers a rangeof big stories: a presidentialvisit, firing of the footballcoach, a gubernatorial debateand two local stories. Beingfeatured on Page One stillmeans prominence.Minnesota DailyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolis, Minn.
  • 33. CONTENT & COVERAGEWith less real estate on thecover, only one story can befeatured, so it better beimportant. Here, it’s aboutwhether students should beable to carry concealedweapons on campus.The Et CeteraEastfield CollegeMesquite, Texas
  • 34. CONTENT & COVERAGEIt’s all local here: studentgovernment elections, theuniversity library’s budget, andthe availability of basketballtickets. Graphics and small artassist with telling the story inalternate forms.The Daily Tar HeelUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill, N.C.
  • 35. CONTENT & COVERAGEAn off-campus party that sentstudents to the hospital andbrought national attention touse of the drink Four Lokoalso gained substantialcoverage in the campus paper.The ObserverCentral Washington UniversityEllensburg, Wash.
  • 36. CONTENT & COVERAGEThe magazine used a themeof “impossible” on which tobase coverage. The magazineis a supplement to the dailynewspaper.InsideIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 37. CONTENT & COVERAGEThe Dream Act, borderprotection and gay bullying —three timely and relevantissues tackled by this Texasmagazine.PanoramaUniversity of Texas Pan AmericanEdinburg, Texas
  • 38. WRITING & REPORTING
  • 39. WRITING & REPORTING• Writing should be crisp. Reporting must be thorough.
  • 40. WRITING & REPORTING• Writing should be crisp. Reporting must be thorough.• Copy should be clean and edited for consistent style.
  • 41. WRITING & REPORTING• Writing should be crisp. Reporting must be thorough.• Copy should be clean and edited for consistent style.• Look at ACP Story of the Year winners for examples of excellence: http://www.studentpress.org/acp/winners/story11.html
  • 42. PRESENTATION:LAYOUT & DESIGN
  • 43. PRESENTATION: LAYOUT & DESIGN• The publication should have a clean and contemporary look.
  • 44. PRESENTATION: LAYOUT & DESIGN• The publication should have a clean and contemporary look.• Visual hierarchy is established.
  • 45. PRESENTATIONThis is a textbook example ofmodular layout and followingtraditional rules: Bold headlinein the upper right, dominantpackage with secondaryelements, smaller headlinesdown the page. It’s atraditional layout that still feelscontemporary through use ofthe left rail and type choices.Golden Gate XpressSan Francisco State UniversitySan Francisco, Calif.
  • 46. PRESENTATIONThe centerpiece featurestands out because of theextra white space as a buffer.The strong vertical photo isgiven appropriate play.Meanwhile, the day’s newsstories are still apparent alongthe left rail.The Daily NewsBall State UniversityMuncie, Ind.
  • 47. PRESENTATIONAnother traditional layoutwith strong attention tomodular design. Art is playedlarge to balance the amountof text.The GW HatchetGeorge Washington UniversityWashington, D.C.
  • 48. PRESENTATIONA huge centerpiece featureattracts the reader’s eye, andseveral points of entry areavailable to the reader.Secondary stories are alongthe left rail. Ragged-right bodytype is unconventional butprovides needed white space.The SentinelNorth Idaho CollegeCoeur d’Alene, Idaho
  • 49. PRESENTATIONA sports section front isanchored by the knocked-outphoto that pokes into theright column. Quick-readelements such as the scorebox, fast facts and kicker aidthe reader.The HeightsBoston UniversityBoston, Mass.
  • 50. PRESENTATIONThis page benefits from use ofcontemporary type faces forheadlines. It shows a Webinfluence with the threestories along the rightcolumn. A strong dominantphoto anchors the page,particularly above the fold.Iowa State DailyIowa State UniversityAmes, Iowa
  • 51. PHOTOGRAPHY,ART & GRAPHICS
  • 52. PHOTOGRAPHY, ART & GRAPHICS• Visuals enhance the verbal content and draw in the reader.
  • 53. PHOTOGRAPHY, ART & GRAPHICS• Visuals enhance the verbal content and draw in the reader.• Quality of photos and art is technically excellent.
  • 54. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSCertain topics requireillustrative art. Here, theconcept of the AmericanDream being just out of reachis conveyed through adrawing.The ClarionMadison Area Technical CollegeMadison, Wis.
  • 55. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSSome creative Photoshoptechniques help make a quickvisual connection betweenUCLA and rival USC on thisspecial section front.Daily BruinUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos Angeles, Calif.
  • 56. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSIntegrating the flag into thecover art is done well here, asis the listing of three teasers.F NewsmagazineSchool of the Art Institute of ChicagoChicago, Ill.
  • 57. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSColor is used well to providevisual cues and in theinfographic, which alsoprovides a visual centerpiecefor the page.The Nevada SagebrushUniversity of Nevada, RenoReno, Nev.
  • 58. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSStrong action photosdominate the page, and theyare played large enough tohave impact. They also havehigh technical quality.The AdvocateContra Costa CollegeSan Pablo, Calif.
  • 59. PHOTO, ART & GRAPHICSThe cover of this literarymagazine gives a nod to theverbose advertising ofyesteryear. The typographysupports the concept.ColonnadesElon UniversityElon, N.C.
  • 60. REPORTING:TYPE & DEPTH
  • 61. REPORTING: TYPE & DEPTH• Major stories should show evidence of multiple sources.
  • 62. REPORTING: TYPE & DEPTH• Major stories should show evidence of multiple sources.• Series or in-depth pieces should be prominent.
  • 63. REPORTINGTwo stories on this pageprovide analysis and contextfor readers: availability of on-campus rooms and the impactof student loan debt. A thirdstory about other Christian-school campuses discussinghomosexuality broadens theperspective from simplereporting of events.The ChimesBiola UniversityLa Mirada, Calif.
  • 64. REPORTINGThe front page isdominated by a packageon medical amnesty,while local stories aboutsmoking and financial aidround out the page.The Daily OrangeSyracuse UniversitySyracuse, N.Y.
  • 65. REPORTINGThis page shows one of manystories about theadministration’s actions (onereason the staff earned theCollege Press FreedomAward). Its watchdog effortstoward the elected andstudent governmentsdemonstrate the best ofcollegiate student journalism.The SunSouthwestern CollegeChula Vista, Calif.
  • 66. Daily Bruin University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, Calif.REPORTINGRather than jus reporting on budget cuts, thisspread highlights solutions with a clever graphic.
  • 67. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP
  • 68. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP• Opinion pages should be alive with a variety of content: staff editorials, cartoons, letters and personal columns.
  • 69. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP• Opinion pages should be alive with a variety of content: staff editorials, cartoons, letters and personal columns.• Content should be consequential.
  • 70. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIPOpinion pages don’t have tobe boring! A strong piece ofeditorial art plus four columnsof equal length on four hottopics combine for a dynamicpage. An in-your-face headlinehelps, too.Indiana Daily StudentIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 71. CONCEPT / THEME
  • 72. CONCEPT / THEME• Concept unifies coverage and content.
  • 73. CONCEPT / THEME• Concept unifies coverage and content.• Theme is relevant to current year or issue and provides structure for storytelling.
  • 74. DESIGN OF THE YEAR
  • 75. DESIGN OF THE YEARFinalists in Illustration, Infographic, Newspaper PageOne, Newspaper Page/Spread and Magazine/Special Section Cover categories
  • 76. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONECharlie Tan LimDaily IlliniUniversity of IllinoisChampiagn, Ill.
  • 77. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONELarry BuchananIndiana Daily StudentIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 78. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONEDanielle KimHarvard CrimsonHarvard UniversityCambridge, Mass.
  • 79. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONEKelly McHughDaily Tar HeelUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill, N.C.
  • 80. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONERenee TakaraDailyUniversity of WashingtonSeattle, Wash.
  • 81. NEWSPAPER PAGE/SPREADClaire Byun and Sean GreeneDaily BruinUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos Angeles, Calif.
  • 82. NEWSPAPER PAGE/SPREADCarlos CalanteEagle NewsFlorida Gulf Coast UniversityFort Myers, Fla.
  • 83. NEWSPAPER PAGE/SPREADMichael AuslenIndiana Daily StudentIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 84. NEWSPAPER PAGE/SPREADNicole E. IacopettiHarvard CrimsonHarvard UniversityCambridge, Mass.
  • 85. NEWSPAPER PAGE/SPREADSusannah BrinkleyTechnicianNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleigh, N.C.
  • 86. NEWSMAGAZINE/SPECIALSECTION COVERStaffEl DonSanta Ana CollegeSanta Ana, Calif.
  • 87. NEWSMAGAZINE/SPECIALSECTION COVERRachel Steinhauser and Claudia AguirreDistractionUniversity of MiamiCoral Gables, Fla.
  • 88. NEWSMAGAZINE/SPECIALSECTION COVERLauren Stott and Matt LiparotaNorthern StarNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalb, Ill.
  • 89. NEWSMAGAZINE/SPECIALSECTION COVERAllison MazeThinkDrake UniversityDes Moines, Iowa
  • 90. NEWSMAGAZINE/SPECIALSECTION COVERMichele Cleary, Jasper L. Clyatt,Hannah D’ApiceDaily SpectatorColumbia UniversityNew York, N.Y.
  • 91. INFOGRAPHICLiliana OyarzunIbisUniversity of MiamiCoral Gables, Fla.
  • 92. INFOGRAPHICLarry BuchananIndiana Daily StudentIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 93. INFOGRAPHICJason WillisThe Oakland PostOakland UniversityRochester, Mich.
  • 94. INFOGRAPHICKo KawazoeReporterRochester Institute of TechnologyRochester, N.Y.
  • 95. INFOGRAPHICSara Gregory, Ryan Kurtzman, Jonathan JonesDaily Tar HeelUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill, N.C.
  • 96. ILLUSTRATIONOlivia AnthonyDaily BruinUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos Angeles, Calif.
  • 97. ILLUSTRATIONJeremy NguyenDistrictSavannah College of Art and DesignSavannah, Ga.
  • 98. ILLUSTRATIONLarry BuchananInsideIndiana UniversityBloomington, Ind.
  • 99. ILLUSTRATIONKaty Jo DesantisThe State NewsMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing, Mich.
  • 100. ILLUSTRATIONJeffrey PallakWingspanLaramie County Community CollegeCheyenne, Wyo.
  • 101. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE
  • 102. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE• Work on the content. Dig around your campus and community for real stories. Don’t overplay or sensationalize. Cover all aspects and all groups.
  • 103. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE• Work on the content. Dig around your campus and community for real stories. Don’t overplay or sensationalize. Cover all aspects and all groups.• Pay attention to photography and graphics. These two areas help your publication stand out from others. Think of the best way to tell a story for readers to read and understand.
  • 104. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE
  • 105. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE• Details make the difference. Typography, white space, style — these are what set Pacemakers apart.
  • 106. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE• Details make the difference. Typography, white space, style — these are what set Pacemakers apart.• Have a strong editorial voice. Make the editorial pages a lively forum on substantive topics.
  • 107. SOME WAYS TO IMPROVE• Details make the difference. Typography, white space, style — these are what set Pacemakers apart.• Have a strong editorial voice. Make the editorial pages a lively forum on substantive topics.• Make every story polished. Write tight. Readers will read long if it’s good. Put columnists on a word count diet.
  • 108. WHAT’S NEXT?
  • 109. WHAT’S NEXT?The 2011 Pacemaker and individual contest winners will be announced Saturday afternoon.
  • 110. WHAT’S NEXT?The 2011 Pacemaker and individual contest winners will be announced Saturday afternoon. Enter your student media in the 2012 contests. Watch your email and our website for deadlines and entry forms.
  • 111. QUESTIONS?
  • 112. QUESTIONS? Thanks!
  • 113. QUESTIONS? Thanks! E-mail: logan@studentpress.orgOnline: slideshare.net/loganaimone