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THE PACEMAKER
Recognizing excellence in student media since 1927.
ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS
Logan Aimone, Executive Dire...
INTRODUCTION
The Pacemaker is the highest honor
in collegiate journalism. For decades, it has
recognized trend-setters and...
KEEP IN MIND…
The images seen in this presentation are
Pacemaker Finalists from the 2009-10
academic year plus 2009 yearbo...
WHO’S JUDGING?
Pacemaker judges are professionals working in media as
well as a range of experts familiar with student med...
WHO’S JUDGING?
Judging is by team.We ask the media organization to
compile a group with representation from various
depart...
HOW DOTHEY JUDGE?
• The number of Pacemaker finalists and winners is
proportional to the number of entries.
• The number is...
WHAT DOTHEY JUDGE?
• Content
• Quality of writing and editing
• Presentation: Layout and design
• Photography, art and gra...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
• The publication should accurately reflect all aspects of student
life, from academics to sports, arts ...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
The newspaper should reflect
a combination of what’s
happening with other
information the audience
needs...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
The newspaper is a watchdog
of the campus leadership and
power centers. Place the news
in tangible term...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
A news section should
present a nice mix of hard
and softer news stories. Page
One supplies a good
oppo...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
Graphic representations and
alternate story forms are
increasingly popular ways to
communicate the news...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
Use headlines and other
display text to deliver the
summary of the news in a
concise way.
The Nevada Sa...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
Feature magazines — either
stand-alone or news
companions — allow an
opportunity to showcase an
importa...
CONTENT & COVERAGE
Yearbooks have the ability to handle topics as
trends rather than daily or weekly updates.
Royal Purple...
WRITING & REPORTING
• Writing should be crisp. Reporting must be thorough.
• Copy should be clean and edited for consisten...
PRESENTATION:
LAYOUT & DESIGN
• The publication should have a clean and contemporary look.
• Visual hierarchy is establish...
PRESENTATION
It’s not always about the words.White space and
images set the tone.
Flux
University of
Oregon
Eugene, Ore.
S...
PRESENTATION
The cover image has to sell
the reader and inform about
the contents.Tease interior
stories without distracti...
PRESENTATION
Classic modular design gets
tweaked with a half-page
photo above the fold, a
nontraditional flag and
numerous ...
PRESENTATION
Several stories compete for
attention on this page, but
each gets a fair shot at
readers’ attention.Again, wh...
PRESENTATION
Inside section fronts can be a
place to experiment and
show off talent in
presentation.This page lays
out the...
PRESENTATION
An anniversary is marked with
a bold centerpiece package.
Discipline with type and color
is evident on this p...
PRESENTATION
Clever graphics, a controlled color palette and
strong use of white space attract attention.
American River
R...
PHOTOGRAPHY,
ART & GRAPHICS
• Visuals enhance the verbal content and draw in the reader.
• Quality of photos and art is te...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
Illustrative art gets noticed.
The small detail of the
maroon-and-gold tie clue the
reader the story ...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
Visual representations of the
news peg help communicate
the message to the reader.
Quality images fro...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
A singular, isolated image
often has impact. Here, the
sports preview is displayed
with attention to ...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
Playful use of a contemporary
typeface for text and
ornaments help tell the story.
Note the narrow, r...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
Modeled art gets attention
because it departs from
traditional photo or
illustrations. Good use of ty...
PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS
The type treatment in this division page is on
trend.
Legenda
Wellesley College
Wellesley, Mass.
Satu...
REPORTING:
TYPE & DEPTH
• Major stories should show evidence of multiple sources.
• Series or in-depth pieces should be pr...
REPORTING
Provide comprehensive
coverage through enterprise
and depth pieces that
enhance the regular spot
news coverage.
...
REPORTING
Interesting and useful
investigative reports result
from public records and
databases. Having a section
dedicate...
REPORTING
When the news event merits
comprehensive coverage,
allocating all of Page One is a
clue to readers the event is
...
REPORTING
An enterprise piece on the
university’s use of a small
airplane to transport campus
officials, rather than drivin...
EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP
• Opinion pages should be alive with a variety of content: staff
editorials, cartoons, letters and pe...
CONCEPT /THEME
• Concept unifies coverage and content.
• Theme is relevant to current year or issue and provides
structure ...
DESIGN OFTHEYEAR
Finalists in Illustration, Infographic, Newspaper Page One
and Newspaper Page/Spread categories
Saturday,...
ILLUSTRATION
Courtney O’Connell
Ibis
University of Miami
Coral Gables, Fla.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
ILLUSTRATION
Brett Miotti
SCAN
Savannah College of Art and Design – Atlanta
Atlanta, Ga.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
ILLUSTRATION
Erik Rodriguez
The Columbia Chronicle
Columbia College
Chicago, Ill.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
ILLUSTRATION
Olivia Liendo
F Newsmagazine
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Chicago, Ill.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
ILLUSTRATION
Tom Tian
Chicago Maroon
University of Chicago
Chicago, Ill.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
ILLUSTRATION
Kyle Lewis
The Daily News
Ball State University
Muncie, Ind.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
INFOGRAPHIC
Bradley Kasten, Jameson Sempey
Cardinal Points
State University of NewYork at Plattsburgh
Plattsburgh, N.Y.
Sa...
INFOGRAPHIC
Hon Lung Chu
The Chronicle
Duke University
Durham, N.C.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
INFOGRAPHIC
Caroline Matthews
Pendulum
Elon University
Elon, N.C.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
INFOGRAPHIC
Marissa Hall and Thea Blesener
The Shorthorn
University ofTexas at Arlington
Arlington,Texas
Saturday, October...
INFOGRAPHIC
Steve Hunt, Marianne Jolley,Alyssa Watson
The Daily Universe
BrighamYoung University
Provo, Utah
Saturday, Oct...
INFOGRAPHIC
Colleen Kirsten
The Daily
University of Washington
Seattle,Wash.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Simone Wilson and Reza Farazmand
UCSD Guardian
University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, Calif.
Sat...
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Larry Buchanan
Indiana Daily Student
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Kyle Lewis
The Daily News
Ball State University
Muncie, Ind.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Luke Shuman
Echo
Taylor University
Upland, Ind.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
J.D. Swiger and Evan Andrews
The Batallion
Texas A&M University
College Station,Texas
Saturday, October...
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Colleen Kirsten
The Daily
University of Washington
Seattle,Wash.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE
Emily Ku
UCSD Guardian
University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, Calif.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD
Becky Rother
The Daily News
Ball State University
Muncie, Ind.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD
Roy Bazan
The Pan American
University ofTexas Pan American
Edinburg,Texas
Saturday, October 30, 20...
NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD
Joseph Tolman, Jackie Hicken, Leah Wasson, Erin Kulesus and Stephanie Edwards
The Daily Universe
B...
NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD
Marlee Gross
The Daily
University of Washington
Seattle,Wash.
Saturday, October 30, 2010
NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD
Madison McCord
The Communicator
Spokane Falls Community College
Spokane,Wash.
Saturday, October 30...
SOME WAYSTO IMPROVE
• Work on the content. Dig around your campus and
community for real stories. Don’t overplay or sensat...
SOME WAYSTO IMPROVE
• Details make the difference. Typography, white space,
style — these are what set Pacemakers apart.
•...
WHAT’S NEXT?
The 2010 Pacemaker and individual contest winners
will be announced Saturday afternoon.
Enter your student me...
QUESTIONS?
Thanks!
E-mail: logan@studentpress.org
Online: slideshare.net/loganaimone
Saturday, October 30, 2010
Upcoming SlideShare
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The ACP Pacemaker 10

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An overview of ACP’s signature award, The Pacemaker, with examples from the 2009-10 finalists and winners, presented at the ACP/CMA National College Media Convention in Louisville, Ky., October 2010.

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Transcript of "The ACP Pacemaker 10"

  1. 1. THE PACEMAKER Recognizing excellence in student media since 1927. ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS Logan Aimone, Executive Director Saturday, October 30, 2010
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION The Pacemaker is the highest honor in collegiate journalism. For decades, it has recognized trend-setters and go-getters, effort and enterprise, achievement and talent. Today, the Pacemaker continues to recognize the best college student work in the nation. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  3. 3. KEEP IN MIND… The images seen in this presentation are Pacemaker Finalists from the 2009-10 academic year plus 2009 yearbooks. Winners will be announced at Saturday’s awards ceremony. Inclusion of a publication in this presentation does not indicate status as a winner. Do not read anything into whether an example was included here. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  4. 4. WHO’S JUDGING? Pacemaker judges are professionals working in media as well as a range of experts familiar with student media. Judges for the 2010 ACP Pacemakers included working professionals from the Washington, D.C., area;Texas Monthly; and Milkweed Editions. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  5. 5. WHO’S JUDGING? Judging is by team.We ask the media organization to compile a group with representation from various departments (writer, editor, designer, photographer, etc.). Entries are judged holistically.There is not a rubric with points attached to certain criteria. Judging is by nature somewhat subjective based on established standards of collegiate journalism. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  6. 6. HOW DOTHEY JUDGE? • The number of Pacemaker finalists and winners is proportional to the number of entries. • The number is not fixed each year, but about half of the finalists will be named winners. • This is a contest, not a critique. • ACP asks judges to provide general feedback on the finalists. Some teams are more thorough. Comments will be shared on our website as part of the winners gallery and inThe Pacemaker book. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  7. 7. WHAT DOTHEY JUDGE? • Content • Quality of writing and editing • Presentation: Layout and design • Photography, art and graphics • Reporting:Type and depth (newspaper) • Editorial Leadership (newspaper) • Overall concept or theme (yearbook, magazine) Saturday, October 30, 2010
  8. 8. CONTENT & COVERAGE • The publication should accurately reflect all aspects of student life, from academics to sports, arts to community news. • College newspapers should emphasize the use of locally generated copy (nonwire). Saturday, October 30, 2010
  9. 9. CONTENT & COVERAGE The newspaper should reflect a combination of what’s happening with other information the audience needs to know.Treat different sides of the story fairly. Golden Gate [X]press San Francisco State University San Francisco, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  10. 10. CONTENT & COVERAGE The newspaper is a watchdog of the campus leadership and power centers. Place the news in tangible terms, in context and in perspective. Help readers understand what the news means. Red & Black University of Georgia Athens, Ga. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  11. 11. CONTENT & COVERAGE A news section should present a nice mix of hard and softer news stories. Page One supplies a good opportunity to display this variety and to set the agenda or prioritize the news items. The Eastern Progress Eastern Kentucky University Richmond, Ky. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  12. 12. CONTENT & COVERAGE Graphic representations and alternate story forms are increasingly popular ways to communicate the news. Poynter research also says they increase reader understanding of the topic and retention of the news. The State News Michigan State University East Lansing, Mich. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  13. 13. CONTENT & COVERAGE Use headlines and other display text to deliver the summary of the news in a concise way. The Nevada Sagebrush University of Nevada, Reno Reno, Nev. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  14. 14. CONTENT & COVERAGE Feature magazines — either stand-alone or news companions — allow an opportunity to showcase an important topic that may or may not be pegged to a news event. Fusion Kent State University Kent, Ohio Saturday, October 30, 2010
  15. 15. CONTENT & COVERAGE Yearbooks have the ability to handle topics as trends rather than daily or weekly updates. Royal Purple Kansas State University Manhattan, Kan. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  16. 16. WRITING & REPORTING • Writing should be crisp. Reporting must be thorough. • Copy should be clean and edited for consistent style. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  17. 17. PRESENTATION: LAYOUT & DESIGN • The publication should have a clean and contemporary look. • Visual hierarchy is established. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  18. 18. PRESENTATION It’s not always about the words.White space and images set the tone. Flux University of Oregon Eugene, Ore. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  19. 19. PRESENTATION The cover image has to sell the reader and inform about the contents.Tease interior stories without distracting from the centerpiece content. Spinnaker University of North Florida Jacksonville, Fla. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  20. 20. PRESENTATION Classic modular design gets tweaked with a half-page photo above the fold, a nontraditional flag and numerous entry points.With similarity to a Web site, this page feels contemporary. The Daily News Ball State University Muncie, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  21. 21. PRESENTATION Several stories compete for attention on this page, but each gets a fair shot at readers’ attention.Again, white space provides the emphasis for a softer centerpiece package. Indiana Daily Student Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  22. 22. PRESENTATION Inside section fronts can be a place to experiment and show off talent in presentation.This page lays out the weekend in sports for the reader. Central Michigan Life Central Michigan University Mount Pleasant, Mich. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  23. 23. PRESENTATION An anniversary is marked with a bold centerpiece package. Discipline with type and color is evident on this page. The Advocate Contra Costa College San Pablo, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  24. 24. PRESENTATION Clever graphics, a controlled color palette and strong use of white space attract attention. American River Review American River College Sacramento, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  25. 25. PHOTOGRAPHY, ART & GRAPHICS • Visuals enhance the verbal content and draw in the reader. • Quality of photos and art is technically excellent. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  26. 26. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS Illustrative art gets noticed. The small detail of the maroon-and-gold tie clue the reader the story is about a campus official. The State News Arizona State University Tempe,Ariz. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  27. 27. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS Visual representations of the news peg help communicate the message to the reader. Quality images from past and present are nice, too. The Flare Kilgore College Kilgore,Texas Saturday, October 30, 2010
  28. 28. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS A singular, isolated image often has impact. Here, the sports preview is displayed with attention to the images with backgrounds knocked out and ample white space. The Daily Northwestern Northwestern University Evanston, Ill. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  29. 29. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS Playful use of a contemporary typeface for text and ornaments help tell the story. Note the narrow, restrained use of color. Round Up Baylor University Waco,Texas Saturday, October 30, 2010
  30. 30. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS Modeled art gets attention because it departs from traditional photo or illustrations. Good use of type enhances the page. F School of the Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, Ill. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  31. 31. PHOTO,ART & GRAPHICS The type treatment in this division page is on trend. Legenda Wellesley College Wellesley, Mass. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  32. 32. REPORTING: TYPE & DEPTH • Major stories should show evidence of multiple sources. • Series or in-depth pieces should be prominent. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  33. 33. REPORTING Provide comprehensive coverage through enterprise and depth pieces that enhance the regular spot news coverage. El Don Santa Ana College Santa Ana, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  34. 34. REPORTING Interesting and useful investigative reports result from public records and databases. Having a section dedicated to business forces stories on this topic to be included regularly, not just when the news is huge. Indiana Daily Student Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  35. 35. REPORTING When the news event merits comprehensive coverage, allocating all of Page One is a clue to readers the event is significant.Approach the story from multiple angles, and continue with follow-up coverage. in subsequent editions. The Daily Collegian Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pa. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  36. 36. REPORTING An enterprise piece on the university’s use of a small airplane to transport campus officials, rather than driving, is exactly the type of watchdog role for the paper. Red & Black University of Georgia Athens, Ga. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  37. 37. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP • Opinion pages should be alive with a variety of content: staff editorials, cartoons, letters and personal columns. • Content should be consequential. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  38. 38. CONCEPT /THEME • Concept unifies coverage and content. • Theme is relevant to current year or issue and provides structure for storytelling. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  39. 39. DESIGN OFTHEYEAR Finalists in Illustration, Infographic, Newspaper Page One and Newspaper Page/Spread categories Saturday, October 30, 2010
  40. 40. ILLUSTRATION Courtney O’Connell Ibis University of Miami Coral Gables, Fla. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  41. 41. ILLUSTRATION Brett Miotti SCAN Savannah College of Art and Design – Atlanta Atlanta, Ga. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  42. 42. ILLUSTRATION Erik Rodriguez The Columbia Chronicle Columbia College Chicago, Ill. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  43. 43. ILLUSTRATION Olivia Liendo F Newsmagazine School of the Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, Ill. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  44. 44. ILLUSTRATION Tom Tian Chicago Maroon University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  45. 45. ILLUSTRATION Kyle Lewis The Daily News Ball State University Muncie, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  46. 46. INFOGRAPHIC Bradley Kasten, Jameson Sempey Cardinal Points State University of NewYork at Plattsburgh Plattsburgh, N.Y. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  47. 47. INFOGRAPHIC Hon Lung Chu The Chronicle Duke University Durham, N.C. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  48. 48. INFOGRAPHIC Caroline Matthews Pendulum Elon University Elon, N.C. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  49. 49. INFOGRAPHIC Marissa Hall and Thea Blesener The Shorthorn University ofTexas at Arlington Arlington,Texas Saturday, October 30, 2010
  50. 50. INFOGRAPHIC Steve Hunt, Marianne Jolley,Alyssa Watson The Daily Universe BrighamYoung University Provo, Utah Saturday, October 30, 2010
  51. 51. INFOGRAPHIC Colleen Kirsten The Daily University of Washington Seattle,Wash. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  52. 52. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Simone Wilson and Reza Farazmand UCSD Guardian University of California, San Diego La Jolla, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  53. 53. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Larry Buchanan Indiana Daily Student Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  54. 54. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Kyle Lewis The Daily News Ball State University Muncie, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  55. 55. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Luke Shuman Echo Taylor University Upland, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  56. 56. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE J.D. Swiger and Evan Andrews The Batallion Texas A&M University College Station,Texas Saturday, October 30, 2010
  57. 57. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Colleen Kirsten The Daily University of Washington Seattle,Wash. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  58. 58. NEWSPAPER PAGE ONE Emily Ku UCSD Guardian University of California, San Diego La Jolla, Calif. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  59. 59. NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD Becky Rother The Daily News Ball State University Muncie, Ind. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  60. 60. NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD Roy Bazan The Pan American University ofTexas Pan American Edinburg,Texas Saturday, October 30, 2010
  61. 61. NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD Joseph Tolman, Jackie Hicken, Leah Wasson, Erin Kulesus and Stephanie Edwards The Daily Universe BrighamYoung University Provo, Utah Saturday, October 30, 2010
  62. 62. NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD Marlee Gross The Daily University of Washington Seattle,Wash. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  63. 63. NEWSPAPER PAGE / SPREAD Madison McCord The Communicator Spokane Falls Community College Spokane,Wash. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  64. 64. SOME WAYSTO IMPROVE • Work on the content. Dig around your campus and community for real stories. Don’t overplay or sensationalize. Cover all aspects and all groups. • Pay attention to photography and graphics. These two areas help your publication stand out from others. Think of the best way to tell a story for readers to read and understand. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  65. 65. SOME WAYSTO IMPROVE • Details make the difference. Typography, white space, style — these are what set Pacemakers apart. • Have a strong editorial voice. Make the editorial pages a lively forum on substantive topics. • Make every story polished. Write tight. Readers will read long if it’s good. Put columnists on a word count diet. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  66. 66. WHAT’S NEXT? The 2010 Pacemaker and individual contest winners will be announced Saturday afternoon. Enter your student media in the 2011 contests. Watch your e-mail and our Web site for deadlines and entry forms. Saturday, October 30, 2010
  67. 67. QUESTIONS? Thanks! E-mail: logan@studentpress.org Online: slideshare.net/loganaimone Saturday, October 30, 2010
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