Print, Pixels & People 11
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Print, Pixels & People 11

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While the printed page has been the dominant medium in scholastic journalism, online publishing has started to take off. But keep in mind: It’s always about people. Plus: 15 Things to Think About......

While the printed page has been the dominant medium in scholastic journalism, online publishing has started to take off. But keep in mind: It’s always about people. Plus: 15 Things to Think About for 2010-2011.

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  • 1. Print, Pixels & People Ideas for today’s student journalist Logan Aimone, MJE, executive director National Scholastic Press AssociationWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 2. Let’s start with a quiz! Keep score at your seat, or just keep track in your head. If you’re really techy, you’ll add your points on your iPhone. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 3. 1. Mobile 5 points: You have a Web-enabled mobile device (BlackBerry, iPhone, etc.) 3 points: You have a cellphone with text message capability (that you use) 1 point: Cellphones can do that? Yours is just for actual phone calls. 0 points: No cellphone. +3 Bonus if you have a Web-enabled phone and an iPad Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 4. 2. E-mail 5 points: You check your e-mail account(s) on your computer, iPad and phone. 3 points: You use only a computer to access e-mail. 1 point: You have to print your e-mails to file them. 0 points: No e-mail. +1 if you’re on Gmail. -1 if you still use AOL. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 5. 3. Microblogging 5 points: You have a Twitter account and regularly send tweets. 3 points: You set up a Twitter account but never send tweets. 1 point: You have at least heard of Twitter. 0 points: You think the only “tweets” are from birds. +1 Bonus: You Tweet from your phone, or if you know and use TwitPic. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 6. 4. Curated Links 5 points: You have an account on Delicious, Digg, StumbleUpon, Publish2 or another social bookmarking site. 3 points: You’ve seen these sites. 1 point: You’ve forwarded a link. 0 points: You thought curating was for museums. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 7. 5. Social Network 5 points: You’re a Facebook expert (pages, groups, photos, links, apps). 3 points: You’ve seen these sites. 1 point: Your main Facebook activity is Farmville or Mafia Wars. 0 points: No active Facebook. +1 if you manage a fan page or a group. -1 if you only have MySpace. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 8. 6. Websites 5 points: You own your own domain name and manage the site. 3 points: You’ve dabbled online with HTML or WordPress. 1 point: You are mainly a user, not a creator online. 0 points: You think the Internet is a “series of tubes.” +1 if you access on your phone. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 9. 7. Flickr 5 points: You have a Flickr account and post images regularly. 3 points: You’ve browsed Flickr. 1 point: You know Flickr exists. 0 points: You think this is about candles and wonder why it’s misspelled. +5 if you know about Creative Commons and have abided by a CC license. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 10. 8. Video 5 points: You’ve created and uploaded a video to YouTube or another site. 3 points: You’ve watched multiple YouTube videos. 1 point: You’ve maybe seen a couple videos online. 0 points: You didn’t know YouTube was an online video source. +1 if you have seen the Old Spice ads. +5 if your question was in one. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 11. 9. Miscellaneous Bonus Points: +2 if you use RSS feeds +2 if you read Mashable.com +2 if you have apps for news +2 if you have apps for lifestyle +2 if you’re on LinkedIn +2 if you’ve made a Google Map +2 if you use Google Docs +2 if you know about QR Codes Pixels & People Print,Wednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 12. Scoring 35+: Impressive! You’re techy. You probably already tweeted your score. 25-34: Not too shabby. You’ll probably update your Facebook about this later. 11-24: You’re somewhat techy, but you could to kick it up a notch. Ask your friends how. 10 and under: Time to start living in the 21st century. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 13. Shifting Gears What’s your platform? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 14. Print What’s working? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 15. Print • Although it has faced challenges from broadcast media, it remains the most common, widespread and portable form of mass media. • It’s relatively inexpensive, portable and accessible. • What is the impact on the school community when printed media are eliminated? • What content should be printed? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 16. Pixels What’s new? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 17. Pixels • While the printed page has been the dominant medium in scholastic journalism, online publishing has started to take off. • More student newspapers — and even magazines and yearbooks — are turning to the Web for a variety of reasons. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 18. Pixels • The Internet allows for instant publishing of content rather than the infrequent publication of print. • Compared to the expense of printing an edition of the newspaper, a website is dramatically less expensive — maybe even free. • However, websites can be hard to manage and inaccessible to many. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 19. People What’s it all about? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 20. People • Ultimately, it’s the content that matters. • You and your staff need to answer this question: • What is the most appropriate format to use to tell this story? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 21. Putting it together What does today’s student journalist need to think about? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 22. Convergence • The term convergence means a “coming together” — and that’s what you have available to you today. • Members of Generation Y (that’s you!) are comfortable with and operating in a converged media environment. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 23. Convergence • Online tools allow a media staff to combine multiple media to deliver content in the most appropriate format: text, audio, images or video. • Online networks like MySpace, Facebook, YouTube, Delicious, Flickr and Twitter allow users to build a community and to customize and share content. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 24. Convergence • Are you and your staff positioned to tell the story in multiple formats? • Why not? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 25. Social Media • Because teens are comfortable in this environment, you need to shift your focus to take advantage of where your readers/ viewers are. • Engage your readers in a way that helps them (they get news) and helps you (you get tips for more news). Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 26. Social Media • Do you have any idea how big of an impact social media are having on every aspect of our lives? • Let’s watch a short video and see… http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=sIFYPQjYhv8 (Social Media Revolution 2, May 5, 2010 Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 27. Social Media • A few highlights from the video: • Nearly all of you (96%) are on a social network. • That’s the #1 Web activity. • More than 500 million people are on Facebook. (More on that in a minute.) • Fastest-growing segment is women 55-65 (that’s your mom or grandma!). Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 28. Social Media • More highlights from the video: • 80% of Twitter use is by mobile device. • That’s instant discussion, good or bad. • Studies show Wikipedia is more accurate than Encyclopedia Brittanica. • But that’s not an excuse for using it as your sole source. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 29. Social Media • More highlights from the video: • 78% of people trust peer recommendations. Only 14% trust ads. • 25% of Americans watched a short video in the last month on their phone. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 30. Facebook • In June 2009, the average United States user spent an average of 4 hours, 39 minutes on the site per month (~9 minutes per day), according to Nielsen Media. • In January 2010, the average U.S. user spent more than 7 hours per month (~14 minutes per day) on Facebook. • That’s more time on Facebook than on Google, Yahoo!, YouTube, Microsoft, Wikipedia and Amazon — combined. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 31. 15 Things to Think About This Year Improving your operation in 2010-2011 Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 32. 1. Be excellent • It probably goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: Strive for excellence. • Excellence isn’t settling for pretty good. • Good enough is not good enough. • Set goals to improve with each edition or deadline. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 33. 2. Get out there • You can’t really get a story unless you get out and talk to people. In person. • Yes, in person! • You can always tell the difference when a writer has observed and interviewed in person. • E-mail or chat interviews fill a need, but they are not as effective as being there. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 34. 3. Find stories • Establish a solid beat system in place to gather the routine news. • Expect that each beat will yield some briefs and longer stories. • Demand enterprise from reporters (editors, too). That means digging around to find something newsworthy and writing it in a compelling, interesting and useful way. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 35. 4. Show us • Probably the most widely read (and most liked) stories are those that tell interesting stories about people. • Your school and community are full of these stories. • Localize national issues with the stories of people around you. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 36. 5. Get a Website • There’s really no excuse today for not having at least a basic website. • Basic: You could post a PDF version of the printed paper. • Advanced: You could update news throughout the school day. • An online presence opens up a new universe of multimedia opportunities. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 37. 6. Get social • MySpace and Facebook accounts are free. Interact with readers by posting links to stories and by getting tips from readers. • With 60 million Facebook status updates daily, you can monitor what’s happening or ask them to let you know about events occurring outside school (or at school but not known). • Let readers submit photos, letters, etc., to you through these pages. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 38. 7. Start Tweeting • Twitter is a free “microblogging” site that works in 140-character messages. • As you gather “followers” you will be able to pass along messages to a wide group of people. That means instantly informing your followers when news happens (sports scores, lockdown, free burritos at Chipotle). • Use hashtags (#word) to label and search. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 39. 8. Get Delicious • Delicious.com is a social bookmarking site that is, guess what, free. • You can post links there that will be useful to others. • The links can be labeled and sorted in a number of ways. • This is a way to enhance content beyond the printed page. • You can also see what others bookmarked. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 40. 9. Use Flickr • Flickr is an online image-sharing service. Yep, it’s free for a basic account. • You can make your images available for people to browse. • Through a Creative Commons license, you can get images to use (free and legal!). Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 41. 10. Use YouTube • YouTube is a solution to upload videos. • It might be blocked on your school’s computers. • However, it’s not blocked on mobile devices or at home, which is where most people will probably access the videos anyway. • If you need a site to get by school filters, try SchoolTube.com instead. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 42. 11. Do multimedia • With a website, not only can you update news and information as frequently as you want, you can improve the content. • The newspaper can showcase one or two images from an event. Online, you can have dozens — with audio and captions. • Yearbook staffs can promote the book through “sneak peeks” or extras that are posted online. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 43. 11a. Try QR Codes • The “QR” stands for quick read and is a type of two-dimensional bar code • Smart phones can scan the codes and launch PDFs, videos or websites • Create a QR code easily and for free online • Even without a website, this is a way to add content and value Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 44. 12. Be the #1 source • Be serious about being the top information source for all things about your school. • If someone wants to know a fact, score, date, record, time or whatever — be the place they turn for that information. • Own sports stats, especially JV and lower squads. • Scoop the local paper. Doesn’t it feel good when that happens? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 45. 13. Do fewer… • Horoscopes and advice columns • Superficial columns (carpe diem, senioritis, slow drivers, etc.) that could be in any year • Double-truck stories on “hot topics” that aren’t tied to a news event. Make sure you have a news peg if you’re committing that much space. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 46. 14. Follow the law • Obey copyright. • Only use “fair use” images or get permission. Flickr lets you search for Creative Commons images. • Use copyright-free music unless you pay a royalty. • Saying it’s “for education” doesn’t let you off the hook. • Know privacy rules. • Know your rights. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 47. 15. Remember… • Your role on campus is to inform and enlighten your audience. • You have a responsibility — an obligation, even — to take that seriously and to do it well. • Your audience needs you to tell them the things no one else will tell them. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 48. Summary Time to wake up if you have been sleeping! Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 49. Print Keep doing it. • It’s perfect for long stories. • People can pick it up and take it with them. • It’s permanent. (You can’t tape a Web page in your scrapbook.) Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 50. Pixels Get more digital. • It’s instant. • You build a community. • Readers expect you to be online. • If you don’t someone else will. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 51. People It’s always about them. • Whether in print or online, it’s the story that matters most. • Find the platform that is most appropriate. • Converge multiple platforms to experiment. • Be excellent. Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011
  • 52. Thanks! Twitter: @NSPA Facebook: National Scholastic Press Association Any questions? Print, Pixels & PeopleWednesday, March 16, 2011