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Chart O Matic
 

Chart O Matic

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Converting information from text to something that will get read. Includes research on what readers look at on the page, and uses examples from student media. Presented at state and national ...

Converting information from text to something that will get read. Includes research on what readers look at on the page, and uses examples from student media. Presented at state and national journalism conventions.

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    Chart O Matic Chart O Matic Presentation Transcript

    • Chart-O-Matic 2.0: Converting information from text to something that will get read Logan Aimone, MJE Executive Director National Scholastic Press Association
    • How this will work…
      • You have to take your own notes. It means more when you do that anyway (plus, I didn’t make a handout).
      • Let me know if you have questions or want more explanation, background or details.
      • No, I won’t send you a copy of this presentation. It’s way too big for that.
      • But you can contact me: logan@studentpress.org
    • Some research…
      • 80 percent of readers look at artwork
      • 75 percent of readers look at photos (’07 research shows bigger, documentary and color helps)
      • 56 percent of readers look at headlines
      • 52 percent of readers look at ads
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies
    • Some research…
      • 31 percent of readers look at story briefs
      • 29 percent of readers look at captions
      • 25 percent of readers look at text
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies
    • That’s right…
      • Just 25 percent of readers look at the text!
      • Completion rates: 63% online, 40% broadsheet, 36% tabloid
      • So why do we put the most time into what we know readers are least likely to read ?
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies
    • New EyeTrack research shows…
      • Alternate story forms (Q&A, timeline, fact box, by-the-numbers) help readers remember the facts presented to them.
      • These forms drew a greater amount of attention but represented just 4% of 16,976 text elements tested.
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies, 2007 EyeTrack study
    • New EyeTrack research shows…
      • Alternate story forms help readers understand .
      • In a reading quiz afterward, more questions were answered correctly.
      • Subjects paid an average of 15% more attention to alt forms than regular text in print (34% in broadsheet).
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies, 2007 EyeTrack study
    • New EyeTrack research shows…
      • Alternative story forms seem to work best with fact-laden stories, providing a way to handle numbers, time, location and juxtaposition references in a simple, comparative way.
      • An explanatory graphic can take a reader into a situation that would be impossible to photograph.
      • A Q&A , timeline , fact box or by-the-numbers list can give information at a glance.
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies, 2007 EyeTrack study
    • New EyeTrack research shows…
      • Photographs capture moments.
      • Long-form narrative seems best for telling compelling, emotional stories about events in someone’s life.
      • 68% of tabloid jumps are read, and 59% of broadsheet jumps are.
      Source: Poynter Institute for Media Studies, 2007 EyeTrack study
    • “ True readers” vs. “Grazers”
      • True readers most likely read all stories, lots of text, and beginning to end. They are methodical.
      • Grazers skip around, entering the page at a variety of points (headlines, captions, sidebars, leads).
    • Even though readers will read in-depth sometimes…
      • Let’s consider making our text into something readers will want to read instead of something they pass over.
      • Remember that readers are attracted to visuals and to small, manageable bits of information.
      • These alternate forms also help the reader understand more .
    • How can it be done? 1. Think visually
      • Comb your text for opportunities for a chart instead of long legs of text.
      • Look for information such as lists, statistics, descriptions and comparisons.
    • Visual: Front Page The Orange County Register, March 8, 2006 Note how this page is really a set of charts.
    • Visual: Car The Orange County Register, March 8, 2006 This should be called an infographic, which sometimes can be a type of chart.
    • How can it be done? 2. Pull out the information
      • Not only does this shorten the amount of text (making it less intimidating), it also provides another entry point.
      • It also allows readers to find information at a glance.
    • Pull-out: Inside Page The Orange County Register, March 8, 2006 See how this chart accompanies the text, providing an entry point and a comparison.
    • How can it be done? 3. Stand-alone charts are OK
      • Sometimes a chart is all you need to tell the story. Comparing student government candidates is an example.
      • Different reviewers’ opinions of movies is another.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Candidates The Apple Leaf, 2006
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Sports Opinion Red Eye, March 8, 2006
    • Comparison Chart: Hybrid Cars The Orange County Register, March 8, 2006
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Sports Preview The Apple Leaf, 2006 This preview has a listing for each sport with a quote from the coach, a player and which games to watch.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Sports Preview The Apple Leaf, 2006 This preview uses color and icons to accent the coverage and improve navigation.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Sports Preview The Apple Leaf, 2007 This preview uses icons to accent the coverage and improve navigation.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Entertainment reviews The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 This set of reviews is divided into sections for movies, TV shows, songs, albums and video games. The images and large numbers attract the eye, and it is clear where the reader should look.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Clubs briefs The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 This looks like a bunch of text, but it actually is a series of briefs about clubs and activities. Readers can start with any topic. Each brief is written in chart style and very tight. Images help break it up.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Clubs briefs The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 Information in each capsule is reader-friendly. Bold-face text helps scanners see categories and key information.
    • Stand-Alone Charts: Theater The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 Even though this page is divided into three areas, it’s clear where to go first. The middle chart about one-act plays is a perfect candidate for a chart to compare each one.
    • Stand-Alone Charts: Theater The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 The large titles and small photos help make this dynamic. Using the subject’s own words is nice, too.
    • Stand-Alone Charts: Theater The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 The cast Q&A is a great entry point.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Reviews North Star, Feb. 15, 2007 All sorts of entertainment reviewed in neat capsules.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Fondue North Star, Feb. 15, 2007 Visuals, information and clever layout. It’s a winner.
    • Case Study: ’07 Etruscan
      • The pages are composed of tilted chart packages.
      • The theme was “And then…” to show a sequence of events and using chronological coverage.
    • Chart: Club activities Etruscan, 2007 Packed with information, this small chart informs the reader about the first meetings of several clubs. Categories include a club leader, turnout, date, goals and a lengthy quote that summarizes the club’s activities.
    • Chart: Class activities Etruscan, 2007 Lengthy quotes and candid photos combine for this element on a class where students created documentary films. Concise intro text sets up the quotes.
    • Chart: Sports Etruscan, 2007 Detailed, storytelling captions accompany well-cropped action photos from a junior varsity wrestling match. The intro text provides background and context.
    • Chart: Social activities Etruscan, 2007 Narrative storytelling in first person can be compelling. This two-part sidebar details how a boy asked his date to the homecoming dance and how she responded.
    • More charts: Stand-alones
      • Most of these charts ran as one-page or double-page charts.
      • They include some introductory text (“chatter”) and the categories.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Royalty The Apple Leaf, 2006 This chart compares candidates for community festival royalty. The rows represent each community. Each girl answered the same questions.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Red Carpet Red Eye, March 9, 2006
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Landmarks The Apple Leaf, 2005 This chart lists five local landmarks. The landmark location, its history and a photo are included.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Election The Apple Leaf, 2004 This chart compared candidates for the presidential nomination in 2004.
    • Stand-Alone Chart: Must-Have Gifts The Apple Leaf, 2005 This chart gives three gift suggestions based on price for various people on your list.
    • More charts: Putting it together
      • Most of these charts ran as part of a larger package of stories, usually a two-page spread
      • These serve as entry points and a way for “scanners” to select just the parts they want to read.
    • Package: Sports The Washington Post, 2006 This full page shows how multiple charts combine with text to create a complete package.
    • Package: Election The Apple Leaf, 2005
    • Package: Election The Apple Leaf, 2007
    • Package: Homecoming week Wa Wa, 2006 The chart allows for packaged coverage on one topic (lunch and evening activities).
    • Package: TV Show Red Eye, March 8, 2006 This chart complements the text about the television show.
    • Chart: Dance moves The Spark, 2007 This sidebar helps illustrate a set of dance moves. It accompanied a story on the school dance team.
    • Sidebar: Reviews The Campanile, 2007 This chart of local restaurants provides information at a quick glance.
    • Sidebar: List The Flashlight, 2007 This layout is very similar to a standing element from Entertainment Weekly, a good source for chart inspiration. The design motif echoes the theme of “On the Spot.”
    • Package: Music Wa Wa, 2006
    • Package: Future Wa Wa, 2006
    • Package: Drama production Peninsula Outlook, April 5, 2006 Three charts: Photo collection By-the-numbers Tech devices
    • Package: Snow fun The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 Three charts: How-to spin 360° on skis Story about a skier Comparison chart for local ski areas
    • Package: Quinceañera The Apple Leaf, 2005
    • Package: Back to school Details, 2007
    • Package: A week in fall Details, 2007
    • Chart: Sport Participants Wa Wa, 2006 This chart allows tight, enhanced coverage. It’s great if you don’t have usable candids of these players. Repetition in section builds unity. Categories: defining moment, achievements, best game.
    • Full Page: Swimming & Diving Wa Wa, 2006 See how it works with the other elements?
    • Full Page: Wrestling Wa Wa, 2006 The chart complements the by-the-numbers list.
    • Chart: Activity Participants Wa Wa, 2006 This one is similar to the sports chart. Categories include reason for joining, three “must haves,” favorite memory and one category unique to the activity
    • Full Page: Choir Wa Wa, 2006 Good coverage can replace traditional copy.
    • Package: Girls basketball The Rock, Jan. 26, 2007 The chart along the right complements the package. It is actually a series of small news bits. There’s also a score list in the middle.
    • In conclusion…
      • Use charts to get information to reader quicker and more visually.
      • Alt forms help the reader understand more.
      • Consider using a chart instead of text to tell the story.
      • Enhance coverage with charts.
    • Thanks
      • Mark Newton, Grand Junction (Colo.) HS
      • Gary Lundgren, Jostens Yearbooks
      • Peninsula HS, Gig Harbor, Wash.
      • Jack Kennedy, Highlands Ranch (Colo.) HS
      • My students at Wenatchee (Wash.) HS
      • The NSPA library
      • You — for participating and attending.
      • My e-mail (again): [email_address]
      • Any questions?